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  • New to Forum

    Hello,

    I'm not sure if I'm doing this right, but I wanted to introduce myself. My name is Alex, short for Alexis. I'm 47 years young and haven't been playing long. I started out with an instructor who made his students play lefty if they were right-handed, which helped my weak hand but left me not able to play some things real well. Now I'm without an instructor but having fun learning on my own with books and videos.

    I have a 5-piece Pearl acoustic set and a Roland HD-1, but I want to trade that in for either a TD-12 or TD-9SX. Can't make up my mind to save my life! I'm a member of the drumsmylife forum, but I've been looking for a forum like this since I fell in love with V-drums...especially since I'm an apartment dweller. I'm already learning a lot here and I just discovered this forum last night!

    Thanks, everyone.

    Regards,

    Alex

  • #2
    Welcome Alex. The TD-9 is the new kid on the block and seems to be being very well received. From what I can tell from the posts (and as you'd expect by the pricing - you tend to get what you pay for!) the TD-12 still pips the TD-9, especially once you beef it up with some V-expression kits, and on general tweakability. They both have strengths and weaknesses and it depends what you want to use the kit for.... practice, performances, recording, just playing about with... etc. When all is said and done, and you've got all the opinions, the best thing is to make sure you try out the kits somewhere and note factors such as how you like the hi-hat responses (check up on other threads but I think that the number of steps between open/closed on the hats is still much more limited in the TD-9 compared to the TD-12 and TD-20), pad sizes, cymbals, rather than just concentrating on the sounds... they can be tweaked.

    Have fun!
    Last edited by Swaledale; 05-04-08, 04:58 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      TD12 vs TD9SX

      Thanks! One of the factors I've been thinking about is the hi-hat response, so I may go for the TD12 after all. I'll be using the kit mainly for practice, since I don't play in a band or anything like that, but I would like the option of being able to use it in a performance setting.

      Thanks for your input!

      Alex

      Comment


      • #4
        Welcome to the forum! Swaledale gave some solid advice. I think the T12 is an excellent option and if you've got the coin it would be an excellent option.
        sigpic

        http://www.silverdragonsound.com

        Comment


        • #5
          I like the td-12

          I've posted on different threads about this subject. I personally would go with the td-12. The td-9 does not have a sequencer that means You do not have any preset patterns, you can't write your own patterns ,record them or save them ,the td-9 has that nice quick record feature where you can save a performance on a usb I really don't know if you can save the quick record on your computer I read on another post that someone was having trouble saving to a computer. The td-9 does have 50 preset songs you can play along with.
          The biggest difference is the td-12 has backing instruments like piano,bass brass,guitar for a total of 262 instruments, this is what I like about the td-12 you can actually create your own musical patterns using the backing instruments. The best thing to do is download both manuals from the roland site and do your own research and if you just want to play get the td-9 if you want to create get the td-12.
          Last edited by snick59; 05-05-08, 07:21 PM.
          [SIGPIC]

          Comment


          • #6
            Td12

            Thanks, guys. The TD20 is way out of my league, but I can save for the TD12 vs. going out and buying the TD9 right away. I'd rather buy something I know I'll be happy with and can expand on.

            The quick record feature of the TD9 is nice, but you're right in that it overwrites the previous recording. You can only have one at a time, but I didn't know people are having problems saving them to computer (or a flash drive?).

            That VH-11 may be the selling point for me. Hi-hat response is all too important to me, and I really like the free-standing hi-hat of the TD12 and TD20.

            Thanks again!

            Alex

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by foxx View Post
              The quick record feature of the TD9 is nice, but you're right in that it overwrites the previous recording. You can only have one at a time, but I didn't know people are having problems saving them to computer (or a flash drive?).
              You can save up to 100 quick record performances on a USB drive. Since they are not audio file, they cannot be saved as audio, bit each quick record performance can be saved to a computer ant then reloaded back into the module for listening. You could literally save thousands of performances to your hard drive.
              What I have found interesting is that you can make a quick record, then play back using any of the different kits..you're not stuck to the kit you used to make the quick record.
              If you want to save the file as audio, just run the audio out through the module to a sound recording program.

              Comment


              • #8
                welcome mr.foxx
                i have mixed opinions about instructors, there are good ones useful for teaching basics but there are ones with some strange ideas that could affect your playing adversely - keep on with the books, i found some great ones and some really awful ones, most drummers say play along to records but develop your own style.
                http://vdrums.com/forum/showthread.p...760#post301760
                :cool:
                ;)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by snick59 View Post
                  I've posted on different threads about this subject. I personally would go with the td-12. The td-9 does not have a sequencer that means You do not have any preset patterns, you can't write your own patterns ,record them or save them ,the td-9 has that nice quick record feature where you can save one performance on a usb but I think it overwrites the previous recording, I really don't know if you can save the quick record on your computer I read on another post that someone was having trouble saving to a computer. The td-9 does have 50 preset songs you can play along with but so does the td-20.
                  The biggest difference is the td-20 has backing instruments like piano,bass brass,guitar for a total of 262 instruments, this is what I like about the td-20 you can actually create your own musical patterns using the backing instruments. The best thing to do is download both manuals from the roland site and do your own research and if you just want to play get the td-9 if want to create get the td-20.
                  I think Snicks meant to say TD-12 throughout this post instead of TD-20 during the second half of it (a Freudian slip... he's lusting for a TD-20.... a common complex )

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Lusting for a TD20

                    Yeah, who isn't?!!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The TD9 recording capabilities

                      Originally posted by Colquhoun View Post
                      You can save up to 100 quick record performances on a USB drive. Since they are not audio file, they cannot be saved as audio, bit each quick record performance can be saved to a computer ant then reloaded back into the module for listening. You could literally save thousands of performances to your hard drive.
                      What I have found interesting is that you can make a quick record, then play back using any of the different kits..you're not stuck to the kit you used to make the quick record.
                      If you want to save the file as audio, just run the audio out through the module to a sound recording program.
                      Wow, I didn't know all that. I guess you have one? Cool, thanks for the info! I'll keep researching but I think I have my eye on the TD12, at least for today.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Swaledale View Post
                        I think Snicks meant to say TD-12 throughout this post instead of TD-20 during the second half of it (a Freudian slip... he's lusting for a TD-20.... a common complex )
                        You are correct
                        [SIGPIC]

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by foxx View Post
                          Wow, I didn't know all that. I guess you have one? Cool, thanks for the info! I'll keep researching but I think I have my eye on the TD12, at least for today.
                          Yes, I got the TD-9 last week.
                          I think it simply comes down to the price point. If you can swing the cost of the TD-12, then that is what you should get. If not, the TD-9 is a great value.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            If you don't go mad on ebay, you can pick up a second hand TD-12 for the price of a new TD-9 module.....

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Ebay

                              I'll check it out. Thanks, everyone.

                              Comment

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