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  • Dreamdrummer
    replied
    Originally posted by winterson View Post
    thanks!
    Here you go:

    Kick: 18x22" Gretsch USA Custom (EZX Rock Solid)
    Snare: Big Crack Snare (EZX Metal)
    Tom1: 8x12" Yamaha 9000 (EZdrummer 2 Modern)
    Tom2: 9x13" Yamaha 9000 (EZdrummer 2 Modern)
    Floor: 16x18" Ayotte Custom (EZX Rock Solid)

    Hihat: 14" Sabian HHX Groove (EZdrummer 2 Modern)
    Crash1: 17" Sabian HHX Xtreme Crash (EZdrummer 2 Modern)
    Splash: 10" Paiste Twenty Custom Metal Splash (EZX Made Of Metal)
    Crash2: 17" Sabian AAX Xplosion Fast Crash (EZdrummer 2 Modern)
    Ride: 21" Sabian Will Calhoun Signature (EXZ Progressive)
    Crash3: 20" Sabian HHX Evolution Ozone Crash (EZdrummer 2 Modern)


    Love these sounds and my kit!
    In the near future I want to experiment with permanent rubber U profiles on the cymbals, instead of the Cymbomutes.
    At the moment I'm making a stealth kicktrigger, instead of the Roland RT-10K

    Kitt2.jpg
    Last edited by Dreamdrummer; Yesterday, 02:28 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • winterson
    replied
    thanks!

    Leave a comment:


  • Dreamdrummer
    replied
    Originally posted by winterson View Post

    what EZX and samples are you using for this video?
    For details I must take a look on my laptop, but off the top of my head:

    EZDrummer2 - Mordern (toms, cymbals)
    EXZ - Rock! (kick)
    EZX - Metal (snare)

    Once I've checked, I will get back to you!
    Last edited by Dreamdrummer; 09-17-19, 05:15 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • mkok
    replied
    Originally posted by willsud View Post
    I was going to mention that - we seldom see drum kits in a church in the UK (more’s the pity )
    Depends where you go. I play drums in a Church of England church. I know of a lot that do use drums. I’ve also played my cajon as well. There are a few big places that have the full compliment of pa operators so could accommodate an ekit. My church isn’t one. I play the acoustic kit which works great and sounds good. The dynamic range of an acoustic kit is so much better so you can get the expression just right. You can’t beat acoustic cymbals with all the different options far more than ride bell and tip. Saying that a Roland kit playing SD3 can do that but I wouldn’t want to do that live. As it stands I turn up and play.

    Leave a comment:


  • winterson
    replied
    Originally posted by Dreamdrummer View Post
    Did a little testdrive with some new sounds

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BNhgcjdDKYE
    what EZX and samples are you using for this video?

    Leave a comment:


  • willsud
    replied
    I was going to mention that - we seldom see drum kits in a church in the UK (more’s the pity )

    Leave a comment:


  • Dreamdrummer
    replied
    It's actually not in the States.
    I live in Holland and it's my own kit :-)

    Leave a comment:


  • winterson
    replied
    what's the deal with the states and all the church drum sets? never heard of that sort of thing here

    Leave a comment:


  • willsud
    replied
    A great picture with the screen, drums and light behind

    Leave a comment:


  • Dreamdrummer
    replied
    Had a church gig last sunday.

    ps. I needed to lower the hihat top... ;-) Kitt.jpg
    Last edited by Dreamdrummer; 09-16-19, 07:50 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • willsud
    replied
    Nice kit - and a very cool carpet! (Meinl I now realise)

    FWIW I've tried all sorts of e-cymbals (just thrown out some Hart Dynamics 'brass' finish plastic ones from years ago I found in the back of the garage ) - I quite like the Jobeky ones I tried a while ago and I have full sets of Gen 16 silver and bronze (and tried fitting the pickups to real Paiste cymbals for a while), but in the end decided to use real Paiste Signature for gigging. On small gigs the band vocal mikes pick up enough of the cymbals, else I use overhead mics. The Gen 16s are handy for practice. If I get to the UK drum show this month I'll give the Jobeky cymbals another try. They seem to sell a lot of them.

    Leave a comment:


  • rdubu
    replied
    Originally posted by MJB View Post
    My A2E kit:

    - PDP Concept LTD shell pack in Olive Stain Lacquer with black hardware. 7x10 and 8x12 rack toms, 14x16 floor tom, 16x22 kick, and 5.5x13 snare.
    - Batter side drum heads are drum-tec real feel. Resonant heads are Remo SilentStroke. Pintech SilenTrim on toms and snare.
    - DW 5000 series hardware.
    - Stealth ISM triggers on toms and kick, ISM-6 on snare.
    - Istanbul Mehmet X-Ray Silence cymbals. 14" hi-hats, 16" and 18" crashes, 10" splash, and 20" ride. Not pictured are Zildjian L80s in same sizes, used when the Istanbuls are too loud (e.g., late night practice).
    - Zildjian Gen16 Digital Cymbal Processor and Direct Source Pickups.
    - Pearl Mimic Pro drum module.

    LOVING it so far. It plays essentially the same as an acoustic and sounds amazing. Still getting the cymbal effects dialed in, and they will probably never sound as good or be as versatile as what I could get triggering e-cymbals through the Mimic, but I prioritized feel over sound.

    I started out drumming earlier this year with a Roland TD-17KVX, using some of the same hardware shown in the pic. I have a lot of good things to say about that kit, but ultimately I was a little dissatisfied with the scale just being so different than "real" drums. I also was starting to get really frustrated once I started trying to incorporate the ride into my playing - I couldn't get over the dead, inarticulate feeling of a big rubber slab, and the poor response of the bell trigger was sort of the nail in the coffin for me. Plus, ultimately, I couldn't shake the feeling that I was playing an expensive toy rather than a serious instrument. And sometimes I felt like I was spending more time scrolling through kits trying to find the "right" sound than I was spending playing. In retrospect, I wish I hd been aware of the drum-tec and V Expressions upgrades for the module, but I guess that would've only solved one problem.

    So I sold the Roland and bought the PDP after a few months - and realized I was sort of starting all over. Learning about drum heads, tuning, kit ergonomics were quite different, etc. And of course, they were LOUD. I found that I was learning a ton, but frankly I started to notice that my practice time was being severely limited by the volume of the thing. I remembered fondly being able to pound away on the Roland until midnight or later without bothering anyone else in the house. I did start to spend more time on a practice pad, which I think is a good thing, but I wasn't drumming as much. And, to be completely honest, my drums never sounded that great. I was spending so much time and effort (and money) on different drum heads, tuning aids, and quiet practice systems but could never get a sound that was really all that satisfying, and I realized that no matter what I did, I was ultimately limited by the acoustics of my practice room. I considered acoustically treating the room, but at that point I think I had had enough.

    At some point it dawned on me that I could have the best of both worlds, and I started building the A2E kit I have now. And it's perfect! Real drums, studio-quality sound, and quiet practice! I should've done this from the get go, but of course I didn't know then what I know now.
    Beautiful kit... I agree that cymbals are a tough compromise on any ekit setup. I've got a full set of ATV cymbals, and have considered selling them off for the Field or Jobeky cymbals, but have seen and heard mixed reviews on those as well. That coupled with the additional acoustic volume that metal cymbals have in general and I'm kind of on the fence.

    In any case, very nice setup and completely agree that A2E kits are a fantastic blend of acoustic feel and inspiration, studio-level sound quality, and 1am, don't piss off the neighbors flexibility...

    Leave a comment:


  • MJB
    replied
    Originally posted by tivi View Post

    Nice kit. You should try Stealth cymbals conversion too and sale your Zildjian Gen16
    Thanks!

    I actually did buy some Stealth cymbal triggers and tried them out on my L80 hi-hats and one of the crashes. I found that the presence of the trigger really deadened the feel of the cymbals, to the point where I felt like I might as well be using rubber cymbal pads. Cymbals are such dynamic instruments that I think itís basically impossible to get something that feels right with current triggering technology. I think the L80s are actually pretty impressive from a technological standpoint - I donít think there is a better option in terms of preserving maximum feel at minimum volume. They sound fairly decent for practice, but I find them a little too dry to be amplified with the Gen16 pickups. The Istanbul cymbals sound much fuller, but the trade off is more acoustic volume.

    Leave a comment:


  • tivi
    replied
    Originally posted by MJB View Post
    My A2E kit:

    - PDP Concept LTD shell pack in Olive Stain Lacquer with black hardware. 7x10 and 8x12 rack toms, 14x16 floor tom, 16x22 kick, and 5.5x13 snare.
    - Batter side drum heads are drum-tec real feel. Resonant heads are Remo SilentStroke. Pintech SilenTrim on toms and snare.
    - DW 5000 series hardware.
    - Stealth ISM triggers on toms and kick, ISM-6 on snare.
    - Istanbul Mehmet X-Ray Silence cymbals. 14" hi-hats, 16" and 18" crashes, 10" splash, and 20" ride. Not pictured are Zildjian L80s in same sizes, used when the Istanbuls are too loud (e.g., late night practice).
    - Zildjian Gen16 Digital Cymbal Processor and Direct Source Pickups.
    - Pearl Mimic Pro drum module.

    LOVING it so far. It plays essentially the same as an acoustic and sounds amazing. Still getting the cymbal effects dialed in, and they will probably never sound as good or be as versatile as what I could get triggering e-cymbals through the Mimic, but I prioritized feel over sound.

    I started out drumming earlier this year with a Roland TD-17KVX, using some of the same hardware shown in the pic. I have a lot of good things to say about that kit, but ultimately I was a little dissatisfied with the scale just being so different than "real" drums. I also was starting to get really frustrated once I started trying to incorporate the ride into my playing - I couldn't get over the dead, inarticulate feeling of a big rubber slab, and the poor response of the bell trigger was sort of the nail in the coffin for me. Plus, ultimately, I couldn't shake the feeling that I was playing an expensive toy rather than a serious instrument. And sometimes I felt like I was spending more time scrolling through kits trying to find the "right" sound than I was spending playing. In retrospect, I wish I hd been aware of the drum-tec and V Expressions upgrades for the module, but I guess that would've only solved one problem.

    So I sold the Roland and bought the PDP after a few months - and realized I was sort of starting all over. Learning about drum heads, tuning, kit ergonomics were quite different, etc. And of course, they were LOUD. I found that I was learning a ton, but frankly I started to notice that my practice time was being severely limited by the volume of the thing. I remembered fondly being able to pound away on the Roland until midnight or later without bothering anyone else in the house. I did start to spend more time on a practice pad, which I think is a good thing, but I wasn't drumming as much. And, to be completely honest, my drums never sounded that great. I was spending so much time and effort (and money) on different drum heads, tuning aids, and quiet practice systems but could never get a sound that was really all that satisfying, and I realized that no matter what I did, I was ultimately limited by the acoustics of my practice room. I considered acoustically treating the room, but at that point I think I had had enough.

    At some point it dawned on me that I could have the best of both worlds, and I started building the A2E kit I have now. And it's perfect! Real drums, studio-quality sound, and quiet practice! I should've done this from the get go, but of course I didn't know then what I know now.
    Nice kit. You should try Stealth cymbals conversion too and sale your Zildjian Gen16

    Leave a comment:


  • MJB
    replied
    My A2E kit:

    - PDP Concept LTD shell pack in Olive Stain Lacquer with black hardware. 7x10 and 8x12 rack toms, 14x16 floor tom, 16x22 kick, and 5.5x13 snare.
    - Batter side drum heads are drum-tec real feel. Resonant heads are Remo SilentStroke. Pintech SilenTrim on toms and snare.
    - DW 5000 series hardware.
    - Stealth ISM triggers on toms and kick, ISM-6 on snare.
    - Istanbul Mehmet X-Ray Silence cymbals. 14" hi-hats, 16" and 18" crashes, 10" splash, and 20" ride. Not pictured are Zildjian L80s in same sizes, used when the Istanbuls are too loud (e.g., late night practice).
    - Zildjian Gen16 Digital Cymbal Processor and Direct Source Pickups.
    - Pearl Mimic Pro drum module.

    LOVING it so far. It plays essentially the same as an acoustic and sounds amazing. Still getting the cymbal effects dialed in, and they will probably never sound as good or be as versatile as what I could get triggering e-cymbals through the Mimic, but I prioritized feel over sound.

    I started out drumming earlier this year with a Roland TD-17KVX, using some of the same hardware shown in the pic. I have a lot of good things to say about that kit, but ultimately I was a little dissatisfied with the scale just being so different than "real" drums. I also was starting to get really frustrated once I started trying to incorporate the ride into my playing - I couldn't get over the dead, inarticulate feeling of a big rubber slab, and the poor response of the bell trigger was sort of the nail in the coffin for me. Plus, ultimately, I couldn't shake the feeling that I was playing an expensive toy rather than a serious instrument. And sometimes I felt like I was spending more time scrolling through kits trying to find the "right" sound than I was spending playing. In retrospect, I wish I hd been aware of the drum-tec and V Expressions upgrades for the module, but I guess that would've only solved one problem.

    So I sold the Roland and bought the PDP after a few months - and realized I was sort of starting all over. Learning about drum heads, tuning, kit ergonomics were quite different, etc. And of course, they were LOUD. I found that I was learning a ton, but frankly I started to notice that my practice time was being severely limited by the volume of the thing. I remembered fondly being able to pound away on the Roland until midnight or later without bothering anyone else in the house. I did start to spend more time on a practice pad, which I think is a good thing, but I wasn't drumming as much. And, to be completely honest, my drums never sounded that great. I was spending so much time and effort (and money) on different drum heads, tuning aids, and quiet practice systems but could never get a sound that was really all that satisfying, and I realized that no matter what I did, I was ultimately limited by the acoustics of my practice room. I considered acoustically treating the room, but at that point I think I had had enough.

    At some point it dawned on me that I could have the best of both worlds, and I started building the A2E kit I have now. And it's perfect! Real drums, studio-quality sound, and quiet practice! I should've done this from the get go, but of course I didn't know then what I know now.

    Leave a comment:

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