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Any tips for playing the TD-9 live?

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  • Any tips for playing the TD-9 live?

    So this coming weekend it looks as though my new band has scored their first gig since I joined, and therefore this will be the first time I'm going to attempt to play my TD-9 live (I've owned it for over 3 years, but never played it live). I've never really done it before so I'm a bit apprehensive. I've heard some stories that some sound guys have absolutely no idea how to set up edrums through the PA system, even though that doesn't really make a whole lot of sense as theoretically they should just be able to plug it straight in and not need to set individual levels for anything or need to mic up each drum or whatever. But because I've never played it in a live environment, I'm also not entirely sure what to expect. While my setup sounds great through my headphones or in our practice room, running it through a PA in a live environment is another thing entirely.

    The problem is, we're not really going to get a chance to go to the venue and test things out beforehand. Added to the pressure is that we are headlining at the gig and will therefore be the last band on for the night, so will probably not have a heck of a lot of time for setup (something like 15 minutes and that includes the previous band getting their stuff off the stage). Not so much a problem on the hardware side (you can after all mostly set it up off stage then just carry it on), I'm more worried about what it'll sound like.

    Is there anything I should know beforehand about playing the TD-9 live? Any specific settings I should go for? What's the best way to run it through a PA system? Should I be using a DI box? Should I use mono or stereo out? Is it better to run the leads from the outputs on the side of the module or the headphones?

    Any help will be appreciated!

  • #2
    I'd keep the headphones output to yourself, worst comes to worst, you can always use a headphone to hear yourself. Do you have an amp which you can use as your personal monitor and/or to provide some stagevolume? I think the biggest problem is to get heard on stage by the other musicians. What do you now use during band practice?
    E-kit: https://www.dropbox.com/s/vpx92wez8v...3558.jpg?raw=1
    A-kit: https://www.dropbox.com/s/vxkwbj1rv7...345-1.jpg?raw=1
    TD-30, KT10, PD-105/125, 13" DIY + BT-1, VH-11/CY14/15/5, PM-30, HD-280 Pro

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    • #3
      Right now, it's just some basic large speakers hooked into a stereo unit that we use during practice. Not brilliant, but they get the job done. I also have a little PM-10 which is actually fine during practice when combined with the speakers, but probably won't do the job when playing live.

      I suppose if I'm running through the PA we can ask to have the drums turned up in foldback, which should solve the stage volume.

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      • #4
        For a long time, I played live eDrums using a keyboard amp next to my kit. I bet you could send a second output directly from the module to the sound guy to use through the PA system, or possibly mic the amp. Now I use a 2000 watt electronic bass drum which I invented. Mark Drumagination
        2000 Watt Carvin powered Electronic Bass Drum,
        built-in DM10 drum module,
        Double TwinSteele Electronic drum pedals
        Footless High-Hat
        Drumagination.com
        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XezG628QXp8

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        • #5
          Wow..I'm shocked some of other veterans have not chimed in here. Well, you have two issues. First, ON STAGE monitoring. How big is this place and how big is the PA? More importantly, if you don't have any monitoring amp/speakers of your own, how big and how many will be on stage for the band? You *might* get by having your drums piped thru the monitors for everyone to hear, including yourself, but unless they are beefy expect no low end and no mid punch to really carry thru.

          To keep it simple you can just send your main L/R outputs of the module to the soundboard. That's the second issue. Is there a dedicated sound guy? Has he ever dealt with e kits before? Any decent sound guy should be able to dial in your kit to sound great in the mix with just the L/R outs from your module. Is there no PA in your band you can run some tests with your drumkit on your own before the gig? Kinda late in the game to get a monitor stack for your ekit now. If the venue is small, no worries. If it's decent sized, you might have to rig something up. I used to use a small keyboard amp with a bass amp to monitor my kit. It really didn't hold up at all and got blasted out by the rest of the band.

          Get busy and keep us posted!

          K ;-)
          My bands: Alter Ego, Arcanum
          E Kit = Roland TDW-20s kit // Roland SPD-S// Pearl Demon Drives//
          A Kit = Tama Swingstar 5 pc (1981) w/roto toms (orig owner!) //Zildjians
          A Kit = Natal 6 pc with Paiste 2000 & Zildjian/MidiKNights/DrumSplitters

          Comment


          • #6
            I agree with Ken about getting your own monitor. You can output from your headphone out and this way you have simple volume adjustment with your headphone knob that won't effect FOH. I find I need to adjust my stage levels when not using in ears as certain songs the guitars are blasting, on ballads or acoustic stuff I feel like I'm too loud. You don't want your adjustments to mess up the FOH guy though.

            Do you use lots of different kits and different snare sounds? If so, I've had luck panning my snare one way and the rest of the kit the other, or kick/toms one way snare/cymbals the other so the soundguy can eq it easier. It's always been pretty easy to get a good balance in volume with everything else, but there are times the snare can get buried under guitars or keys depending on the song. This just gives your soundman better individual control of the kick and snare.You should not suffer not being in stereo, that's overrated for live. Very few people are in a great position to appreciate stereo, if you're off to the far left, you'll miss a lot of what's coming out of the right, etc. Bottom line, most will notice the kick or snare being buried more than they will stereo tom effects.

            Otherwise, just send him your left and right as normal, you might find you want to put your snare a little louder in your mix so it cuts through though.

            The only other thing I can tell you is the more I played out with a TD9, I built kits for power rock, ballads, dance, whatever. So the rock and dance I added volume to the kick and snare, on the ballads I left it more balanced with the kit, etc. There were certain tunes I times I need to boost the level of a cowbell and I learned what songs it needed to happen, used a kit for that, then a different one if I did not need it to really cut through as much, etc.
            TD50 Digital Pack, TD30 and TD9 Modules, custom made pads, Gen16 crashes, and hats plus a few other things that I'm not sure what to do with or why they're still in my kit. Bands: Espada http://www.musicaespada.com/ and JamCo https://www.facebook.com/JamcoEntertainment, https://www.jamcoband.com/

            Comment


            • #7
              First, ON STAGE monitoring. How big is this place and how big is the PA? More importantly, if you don't have any monitoring amp/speakers of your own, how big and how many will be on stage for the band? You *might* get by having your drums piped thru the monitors for everyone to hear, including yourself, but unless they are beefy expect no low end and no mid punch to really carry thru.
              It's only a relatively small venue. I haven't played there myself before, but I have been to other gigs there, and they do like to have things turned up loud.

              I'm thinking of possibly picking up a 600W powered speaker to use as a monitor, but I don't know if I'll have the chance to get it on time for the gig. I'm hoping the venue has its own foldback speakers and I can use one of those.

              There's four of us in the band: 2 guitars, bass and drums.

              Is there a dedicated sound guy? Has he ever dealt with e kits before?
              Yes, the venue has a dedicated sound guy. I have absolutely no idea if he's dealt with ekits before though.

              You can output from your headphone out and this way you have simple volume adjustment with your headphone knob that won't effect FOH.
              The TD-9 does not have a dedicated headphone volume control. The headphone volume is controlled by the same volume knob that the line out volume is controlled by.

              Do you use lots of different kits and different snare sounds?
              Generally, no...not for the style of music we play (alternative rock/punk). I've created one custom kit that I use for pretty much everything, though I occasionally switch between a couple of the in-built ones.

              Comment


              • #8
                Ahh right, sorry, been playing a TD30 for a while and forgot the 9 does not have that knob

                If you primarily use one kit, I'd recommend using two DI's so you can split your signal to FOH. If you can get a simple 2-4 channel mixer, you can go from that into your monitor. This gives you an easy access volume knob compared to reaching for the control on the monitor. Even better would be if it has a 3 band EQ so you can control the sound a little in your monitor. The DI's simply allow you to not mess with the FOH sound, as it seems like you are aware.

                What kind of 600 speaker? That's plenty of power, you just want to make sure it's got a nice full range sound.

                Since you use just one kit and play the same style of music, you should be able to run through a few songs with the band and ask the sound guy if you need to bring anything up or down. Then he should be able to easily ride your faders the rest of the night.

                The only thing I've ever found soundguys not to love about ekits is lack of individual control. For example, you might have all toms the same level and it sounds great in phones, but the floor tom rattles the house PA. They can't address that without effecting the other toms and maybe kick. Where with individual outs or acoustics, they can tweak just that drum.
                TD50 Digital Pack, TD30 and TD9 Modules, custom made pads, Gen16 crashes, and hats plus a few other things that I'm not sure what to do with or why they're still in my kit. Bands: Espada http://www.musicaespada.com/ and JamCo https://www.facebook.com/JamcoEntertainment, https://www.jamcoband.com/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Well the gig has come and gone and as it turns out, I had nothing to worry about. The sound guys had a great setup and they were awesome to work with. They were a bit iffy when I told them that there was only one output that controlled everything (rather than having separate outputs for the cymbals/kick/other drums) but that turned out to be a non issue. No trouble at all with the stage volume, they had plenty of foldback speakers at the front of the stage and a big wedge behind me, and all I needed to do was plug into the DI and they did the rest. I asked them to make sure they cranked the drums up in foldback so the band could hear me, and that was about it. I guess it was a good thing I had the custom kit created in the module with all my levels pretty much right, so once I was into the sound system, I barely needed to do anything.

                  And the gig went off. Lots of people commented that it sounded great, and the band that was on before us even came up to us after the show and asked how we got the drums sounding so good because every time they had tried it with an ekit it sounded like rubbish.

                  I'm guessing it's not always going to be that easy, but for a first up gig with the ekit that was the best experience I could hope for.
                  Last edited by White_Pointer; 12-01-13, 04:41 PM.

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                  • #10
                    This is AWESOME!! Way to go!! Another victory for live e kits!

                    K ;-)
                    My bands: Alter Ego, Arcanum
                    E Kit = Roland TDW-20s kit // Roland SPD-S// Pearl Demon Drives//
                    A Kit = Tama Swingstar 5 pc (1981) w/roto toms (orig owner!) //Zildjians
                    A Kit = Natal 6 pc with Paiste 2000 & Zildjian/MidiKNights/DrumSplitters

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Kenster View Post
                      This is AWESOME!! Way to go!! Another victory for live e kits!

                      K ;-)



                      Rock n' Roll!!!


                      "My best friends' name is J-SON. They used to call him 'Mr. Parse.' He has an 'Error'..!"

                      http://www.vdrums.com/forum/core/cus...ar33631_4.jpeg

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Congrats! I find ekits to be far superior live unless the venue is large enough to not hear the stage volume of an acoustic kit. I've heard many great bands sound like garbage live because they can't get a good mix over a hard hitting drummer,
                        TD50 Digital Pack, TD30 and TD9 Modules, custom made pads, Gen16 crashes, and hats plus a few other things that I'm not sure what to do with or why they're still in my kit. Bands: Espada http://www.musicaespada.com/ and JamCo https://www.facebook.com/JamcoEntertainment, https://www.jamcoband.com/

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          So I've got my second gig coming up this Friday using my TD-9. Same venue, and presumably same sound guys.

                          After the last gig the sound tech recommended I pan the kick into one side and everything else into the other, so he can control the kick volume independently. Seemed like a reasonable request. So this is what I've done this time around, panned the kick into the right side and everything else into the left (took some fiddling to get all heads and rims panned properly, and I needed to turn ambience off completely as that was causing faint "echoes" of some drums and cymbals into the kick side, and echoes of the kick into the other side). Obviously I'll need to run 2 cables out of the module now instead of one.

                          Hopefully he'll be happy with that. I'm confident they won't have an issue getting it sounding good, although with no ambience I'm wondering exactly what it's going to sound like. Makes a BIG difference through the headphones, but what it'll sound like live is another matter.

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                          • #14
                            If you coud connect your phones-output into a small (...4-channel or so) submixer, you would have a facility to hook up your own reverb-processor for your personal monitoring!




                            "My best friends' name is J-SON. They used to call him 'Mr. Parse.' He has an 'Error'..!"

                            http://www.vdrums.com/forum/core/cus...ar33631_4.jpeg

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                            • #15
                              Yeah I really don't want to have to lug around yet another piece of equipment. At any rate, I'll see what it sounds like tomorrow night.

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