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  • First live gig

    Hi,

    In about a month i have my first ever live gig

    It's not a big thing just a concert at my school for a leaving party thingie.
    Everybody gets 10 minutes on stage to do whatever they want and me and a couple of friends decided we would give it a shot.

    It started off as just a joke and we didn't really take it too seriously but recently it suddenly got very competitive and the rest of my band are really keen to win (iv'e got no problem with that )

    We decided to play 2 songs; Master exploder by tenacious D (that's just to get the crowd into the music) and then Numb encore by linkin park (this is our proper song which we have worked pretty hard on).

    Anyway i have the TD-9KX and i have no idea how to link it up to any speakers. The school has a good amount of equipment like mixers and a wide variety of speakers and PA's.

    I have arranged to talk to the school technician because apparently he has had no experience with V-drums.

    What kind of things to i need to talk to him about?

    Do you need a dedicated sub-woofer to get a decent thud from the bass drum?

    As a final question, my band has been nagging me about doing a 30 second drum solo or something along those lines while they set up for the next song. The thing is , when i try to improvise, i can never really think of anything to play and even if i do i always think that it sounds bad without backing music.

    Do you have any tips about drum solo's?

    EDIT: Oh yeah and because there are other acts, i have to move my drum kit on and off the stage pretty quickly. Do you reckon it would be possible to just pick up the entire thing just move it on and off the stage?

    Thanks for any help,

    Regards,

    Pompalomp

  • #2
    With the drum solo you can build tension (music is all about tension and release verse crescendo) , so you can tap the hi-hat in 4x at 100bbm with a big bass kick every 8 bars (a U2 sound), do that for 30 seconds and you have tension. Or you can go nuts of course and you become the center of attention which is not a bad thing So if you're not confident then let the drums create the music and do the work, just my 2 cents.

    The module is just two main outputs so it's easy enough for the man to arrange his gear eh.

    Hearing yourself seems to be the main problem I see after reading the forum so I'll let others have there more valued input.

    Good luck and I envy you..you are about to have a huge amount of stress and fun
    I can lift my complete td-12 6 meters in 10 seconds. You'll be fine but don't drop it of course Get it all wired up and ready to plug the mains out.
    Last edited by Sook; 01-09-09, 04:41 PM.
    Nothing of importance here

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    • #3
      Sook,

      Thanks alot for the info

      The thing about building up the tension gave me a pretty good idea for the solo, Thanks!!!!

      Regards,

      Pompalomp

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      • #4
        Does anybody else have any opinions?

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        • #5
          The great thing about vdrums over acoustics for a live gig is the ease of pumping out the sound. You don't need mics all over the kit since you already have straight outs from the module. All the discussions around 'sound guys' that get all weird around vdrums makes no sense to me. It makes their job SOOOOOO much easier imo. If they are confused, I'd just tell them to imagine they are hooking up a keyboard into their system. That way you'll get the sound response you would want out of it as far as the lows and highs.

          As for moving your kit around. I just unplug the pedals and pick the entire rig up as it doesn't weigh much at all. Another nice thing about the vdrums over acoustics. You can basically pick it up and put it in the back of a truck with out breaking it down...unless of course that is what you want to do. Still...pick it up...move it somewhere else and then break it down. Easy peasy!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Pompalomp View Post
            Hi,


            Anyway i have the TD-9KX and i have no idea how to link it up to any speakers. The school has a good amount of equipment like mixers and a wide variety of speakers and PA's.

            I have arranged to talk to the school technician because apparently he has had no experience with V-drums.

            What kind of things to i need to talk to him about?
            You need to explain to him that e-drums have the largest frequency spectrum and dynamic range requirements of any instrument ever plugged into a PA system.

            You need lots of power, a system with at least 15" woofers ( or a dedicated subwoofer), good sturdy midranges and tweeters, and the ability to play loud.

            The easiest thing is just to run a single mono main out, which will retain all your instrument balances and effects which is a good thing. The less you can let an inexperienced soundman affect your drum sound the better! Keep it simple. Going stereo, etc, won't make much difference sonically, but will introduce many more ways to have the whole thing get screwed up.

            --> You also need to explain to him that you must have a drum monitor set up so you and your band mates can hear what you are doing. Something like a JBL G2 - a self powered PA speaker with a big woofer is great. Set it up behind you so the sound whizzes past your ears and then reaches out to your mates.

            Originally posted by Pompalomp View Post
            Do you need a dedicated sub-woofer to get a decent thud from the bass drum?
            Not if you have really good PA speakers and amps with 500+ watts output.

            Originally posted by Pompalomp View Post
            As a final question, my band has been nagging me about doing a 30 second drum solo or something along those lines while they set up for the next song. The thing is , when i try to improvise, i can never really think of anything to play and even if i do i always think that it sounds bad without backing music.

            Do you have any tips about drum solo's?
            Here is my two cents for you ( worth about two cents too):

            You can't do a lot in thirty seconds, and it sounds like you don't do a lot of drum solos. Me neither! Here is a recipe for a good short drum solo:


            Start off by not starting off Keep playing the same beat you were playing for the song. This does two things - it will help you keep your timing steady during the solo, and it gives the audience a reference or base to what they are going to hear next. Play a measure or two of this, then switch your right hand ( if you are a rightie) to the ride bell for effect.

            Next, riff on the song's beat. Change it up any old way you want, but keep some things steady - your high hat stays going, or you switch to four on the floor. The key is to keep the tempo the same - I assume it is 4/4 or 6/8 - and some thing(s) steady.

            The wow - audience LOVE polyrhythms. Keep the 4/4 or 6/8 going steady, and then start playing any sort of paradiddles around the kit in a polyrhythm time signature.

            So, if the song is in 4/4, and you have say, a four on the floor in 4/4 playing on the kick, then start playing paradiddles around the kit in triplet time. Or vice versa.
            It's easy to do and sounds amazing. Plus, you are not just going nuts, so your tempo will stay constant, and you won't forget where you are.

            Hit a crash, do your favorite lick whilst looking at your bandmates to come in, and then go back to the song.


            Originally posted by Pompalomp View Post
            EDIT: Oh yeah and because there are other acts, i have to move my drum kit on and off the stage pretty quickly. Do you reckon it would be possible to just pick up the entire thing just move it on and off the stage?
            Yup, this works well, especially if you a buddy help you.

            HTH

            GB
            Immensely powerful yet with a liquid cat-quick elegance

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            • #7
              Great advice from the guys to be honest!

              As for the techie not having experience with vdrums , all you need is the feed from your MONO channel on the module to the mixing desk. Don't make a mistake on the day though i.e. plugging the mono lead into the Headphone socket or stereo socket! Only half your kit will come through the PA LOL!!!

              For the drum solo, if you can't think of something that would naturally come to you then don't do one! If you've been practicing a cool sounding rudiment over the kit then fine do that. But please don't just make something up on the spot or go wild! It's cringe-worthy stuff when it doesn't go right! Plus at this moment in time you have know idea how your kit sounds through the PA. If all else fails stick to your job in the band: keeping the beat and staying solid. Also, the worst aspect of a crap solo is when someone films it and then shows it to you later on down the line...urrghh!!!

              You and one of your bandmates should be able to lift the entire kit and move it off the stage.

              What will you be doing for onstage monitoring?
              :eek:

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              • #8
                WOW!!

                Thanks for all of the info you guys, i will try out your ideas

                Regards,

                Pompalomp

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