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Do you have a back up plan?

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  • Do you have a back up plan?

    I'm back into drumming after being away from it for awhile. In the "old days" with my A kits, I always brought a 2nd snare, extra kick pedal, and back up heads just in case something broke.

    I've only played one gig with the E kit, but I've worried about what happens if the module goes "Kaput" for some reason just before or during the gig. I would have no way to continue and it would be very bad. I can bring extra cables, mesh heads, etc. but it would be pretty costly to have a second module "just in case".

    Is this a concern of others? Do you have a second module or what else do you do to ensure that you don't let the band mates down?

    Thanks,

    -Cram

  • #2
    2Box DrumIt Five, TDW-20BK , additional Kit Toys & Roland cymbals, 2Box, Pearl and Sonor pedals

    Comment


    • #3
      Here are links to a couple of threads about "emergency kits" and backup plans; the mention of preparing for module failure is there throughout:

      http://vdrums.com/forum/showthread.php?t=24689

      http://vdrums.com/forum/showthread.php?t=27079

      A lot of participant input also refers to spare cables, module power supply/cord, CF card, and other electrical cords. If your primary module develops problems, this allows you to do some basic troubleshooting by replacing the accessory items first.

      It may not be the module itself - it may be the power supply, etc - and you may be able to continue with your primary module and all your settings after all.

      Also note the mention by some of having a basic, maybe older, module as a backup regardless...
      Hart Pro 6.4 (Hammered Chrome), Roland TD-8, Gibraltar Throne w/ Backrest, Tama Iron Cobra Bass Pedal, ALTEC A7-500 "Voice of the Theatre" Speaker/Horn System with Sunn Concert Slave amp and lot of other audio stuff, Sony MDR-7506 Headphones, Zildjian DipSticks - and Czech Skorpian, Heckler & Koch MP5, etc Submachine Guns to stick out the window behind my kit for some quite unique fills...

      Comment


      • #4
        Here's another similar thread from a little while ago:

        http://www.vdrums.com/forum/showthread.php?t=36502
        DIY converted Ludwig Epic acoustic to E-Kit
        Surge, Yamaha, Roland, and AtoE cymbals

        Roland TD-10 module
        Superior Drummer/Addictive Drums combo

        Comment


        • #5
          If this is a big concern, you should consider getting a backup module. You don't need to match your "main" module, just get one that will give you a snare, hat, kick, ride, crash and a tom or two.

          The fact is, there are several peices of gear without which your band would be SOL - guitar(s), keys, bass, main mixer, power amp, etc. No one drags around spares of these, do they?

          Modules, like most electronic equipment, perform dependably when used with reasonable care.

          But that brings up an interesting question. I think I'll start a new thread and see how many people have had their module just go completely out with no warning.

          Edit - Here's your backup. Get a cajon and learn to play it. Use it to hold your beer or whatever when you play, but if the module goes out, plug in a mic and have at it!
          Last edited by stickinthemud; 06-28-08, 11:14 PM.

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          • #6
            Hmm, when I go gig with my e-kit (haven't done so yet), I think I will keep a small a-kit ready in our van... We usually have plenty of room, so why not have at least a bass drum, snare drum, mics, a hihat, crash and ride and a small tom or two? Most of the stands are already there (TD-12)... hihat stand, crash/ride cymbal stands. The bass pedal is already there, so if I use a snare stand for the snare pad, that stand is already there as well.
            Ask not whether something is useful -- ask what it is useful for.

            Roland TD-12, Iron Cobra hihat stand and bass-drum pedal from TAMA. My accoustic kit is a Yamaha Power-V Birch with Paiste Alpha-series splashes, crashes, and hihat. My ride is a Zildjan Ping Ride, 20" I think.

            Check out my TD-12 on Youtube. My page is here http://www.youtube.com/HerlPearl.

            Comment


            • #7
              I have a kit with both TD10 and TD7 modules and all the pads. Effectively it is two kits. So if the TD10 goes out, I'd just have to move some cables around and I'd at least have the basics. If the TD7 goes out I just lose some percussion and cymbals. For one gig it wouldn't be a big deal.

              I kept my TD7 instead of selling it because I wouldn't have been able to get much for it (maybe $500.00 to $700.00) and I wanted extra percussion. I didn't think about the backup thing, but now that you mention it I already smartly prepared for it! Are I a genius or what?

              And if anybody says "or what" I'll smack you with my TD7.

              Shalom
              Bruce

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks for all of the replies gang. Bruce, yes you are a genius! Thanks for the links from several others. I didn't know what to put into the search engine. Those threads brought up a number of things I had not considered.

                If (when) I get to upgrade my module, I will probably hang on to the current one for a back up. That, of course, makes a new one a bit further off since no $$ coming in to off-set the cost (unfortunately, that was going to be my strategy with my wife to upgrade - "Hey honey, I can sell the old module and it won't be THAT much more" - you know, that argument).

                Again,

                Thanks!

                -Cram

                Comment


                • #9
                  I sympathize. My wife was very puzzled when I didn't sell the TD7. Very, very puzzled. But I told her I just couldn't get much for it (I paid, like, $2,000.00 or something new in '97). And it's cheap insurance for a gig. Besides, holding on to it long enough means I might be able to sell it for MORE when it becomes an antique!

                  Okay, so there went the genius title right out the window.

                  Shalom
                  Bruce

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Glad you guys have seen the light by hanging onto modules when you get new ones


                    Originally posted by Cramsession View Post
                    .......I can sell the old module.......
                    Aretha Franklin: "Don't you blaspheme in here! Don't you blaspheme in here!"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Cramsession View Post
                      I'm back into drumming after being away from it for awhile. In the "old days" with my A kits, I always brought a 2nd snare, extra kick pedal, and back up heads just in case something broke.

                      I've only played one gig with the E kit, but I've worried about what happens if the module goes "Kaput" for some reason just before or during the gig. I would have no way to continue and it would be very bad. I can bring extra cables, mesh heads, etc. but it would be pretty costly to have a second module "just in case".

                      Is this a concern of others? Do you have a second module or what else do you do to ensure that you don't let the band mates down?

                      Thanks,

                      -Cram
                      Take an Akit with you. OK so you need a bigger motor. Better safe than sorry.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Good subject! I put over 300 stage hours on my DM-5 with no module problems and 930 hours stage time on my TD6V with no problems. I did sell the DM-5 and intend to buy another back up module but there seems always be something more to add to the kit.

                        As for the kit: everyting is interchangeable. If piece goes down, I just quickly program around it on the fly. I carry a fix it kit and all the rebuild parts I need. I have resoldered pads, piezos, e-cymbals and bass drums during the breaks. However this is rare. I always have two KD-7 Bass drums on stage and a third in the kit box.

                        My big delima is which module to buy as a back up. I love the workability of the TD6V but because so many house kits are going to TD20 kits, I may be forced into a TD20 in self defense. (so that I am more familiar with it). If the TD20 wasn't so darn expensive it would be an easier choice.
                        Last edited by drumslinger50; 07-01-08, 09:54 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Cramsession View Post
                          Thanks for all of the replies gang. Bruce, yes you are a genius! Thanks for the links from several others. I didn't know what to put into the search engine. Those threads brought up a number of things I had not considered.

                          If (when) I get to upgrade my module, I will probably hang on to the current one for a back up. That, of course, makes a new one a bit further off since no $$ coming in to off-set the cost (unfortunately, that was going to be my strategy with my wife to upgrade - "Hey honey, I can sell the old module and it won't be THAT much more" - you know, that argument).

                          Again,

                          Thanks!

                          -Cram
                          I haven't had the chance to read through those threads yet, but this is worth mentioning, its cheap insurance.. These modules are electronics, and i've typically seen edrum players at best use a wal-mart quality power strip. I bought an APC 350kva UPS battery backup that I plug mine into whether practice or gig, its not so much that i can continue in an outage, fine if i've got headphones on practicing, wouldnt help if house loses power at a gig, but it will protect against brown outs and surges etc which could/would easily destroy either the power supply, the module or both. It cost me about $40 dollars and yeah its an extra thing to bring and its heavy but it is good piece of mind.

                          -Frank

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I have in my emergency kit: TD 6 Module, mesh head, a couple cables, extra power supply, extra pad and kick pad.
                            Ostrich Hat
                            www.ostrichhat.com

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by froe234 View Post
                              I haven't had the chance to read through those threads yet, but this is worth mentioning, its cheap insurance.. These modules are electronics, and i've typically seen edrum players at best use a wal-mart quality power strip. I bought an APC 350kva UPS battery backup that I plug mine into whether practice or gig, its not so much that i can continue in an outage, fine if i've got headphones on practicing, wouldnt help if house loses power at a gig, but it will protect against brown outs and surges etc which could/would easily destroy either the power supply, the module or both. It cost me about $40 dollars and yeah its an extra thing to bring and its heavy but it is good piece of mind.

                              -Frank
                              A big bump to this. I have a good UPS set up in my studio and, aside from saving the loss of good recording sessions a few times during power failures, this UPS has saved my gear from at least half a dozen potentially damaging surges so far.

                              Comment

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