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Anti-Edrum Bias, Live Gig Update

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  • Anti-Edrum Bias, Live Gig Update

    We just played our first real live gig, at a big deck at a restauraunt in Springfield MO in association with a monthly art's festival evening out. It was windy and unseasonably cold so the actual deck crowd was small. However, the sidewalk crowd was vibrant and got into much of what we were doing. We do a 90 minute, 17 song set, the first chunk is, no shock here, Alan Parsons Project stuff, some of which is so obscure, most people probably think it's original--then we do some Pink Floyd, then 3 originals, then one final Project song).

    Okay, this post isn't about our ability to pull this off with all the crap we tote along (we have an appalling amount of gear for a bunch of posers) but about how the edrums were received.

    We setup on the deck in an L-shape: I was on one end with my back to the "fence" (standard decking fencing, very nice but tall), the bassist was at the meeting point of both points of the "L", then everybody else lined up against a brick wall. We faced out onto one street but my back was to another street and thus, people on the sidewalk could walk right up behind me and watch me play.

    Now, I'm no great shakes as a drummer. I've been doing it for 4 years and don't consider myself particularly gifted, etc. My kit, as most of you know, looks as e-kit-ey as they get (Accupads, black Yammie crashes, a Kit Toy splash--the only things that look accoustic are the Hart HH and ride).

    And as many of us gripe, there are many *bands* out there who have a real anti-edrum bias. You can UTFSE for details.

    But during both sets (we simply repeat our 90 minute set), both the bassist and one of the lead singers (they have more time to observe than the rest of us) saw time and time again, people would come up behind me and watch in rapt fascination at the drummer. Again, my "skill" doesn't warrant that kind of attention. It was clear that they'd never seen edrums before and were incredibly impressed at what they could do.

    I only use 3 kits. One is my straight forward "big rock" kit. I then have a roto-tom kit for a chunk of the Floyd stuff, then I have a bongo kit for one of the originals that we do "accoustically". So it's not as if I'm really showcasing all the things any given module can do.

    And then after the second set, I had several people come up to me and say something to the effect of "wow, that's a great electronic drum kit--I never knew they could do that--really state of the art--awesome!"

    Now, I can guarandamntee you that these people weren't listening to the show and saying "yunno, that kick drum doesn't sound like a Sonar X model with a Mapex head". All they heard was some competent musicians who happen to be really good at obscure Alan Parsons songs and Pink Floyd.

    And this is what I think *bands* who give you the evil eye when you say "I'm an edrummer" totally miss: the audience member. You're there to make an impression of some sort and if the edrums highlight the overall band effect, that's great. Again, most audience members don't give a crap about the sound of the drums (other than they're typically waaaaay too loud since they're, duh, acoustic) but can get into the "gee whiz" factor of an edrum kit doing much the same thing as any acoustic kit.

    So, the next time you hit some narrow minded band who doesn't want to give you an audition cuz you're electric, well, for starters, find another band. But if you want to try to convert em, pass along this little story.

    www.myspace.com/rubberuniverse
    TD-12, DTX502, SD1000, EZDrummer, Diamond Drum 12" snare, S1000 toms/cymbals/kick, PCY10/100/135/155, CY-5/14, Hart Ride, Hart Acupad 8" kick, Epedal Pro II, Concept 1 pads/cymbals, SD1000 & Roland V Sessions racks, PD-7, Kit Toy 10" splash, DMPad ride, SamplePad, PerformancePad Pro

  • #2
    Grog-Thanks for sharing that. Edrums can be just as impressive as an A kit and in my mind maybe more so. I've said it several times in the forum. The audience really cares more about the overall sound of the band than how big or sparkly the drumset is. I've had the last couple months off for family reasons, but I usually play night after night and venue after venue with the Edrums with no reaction at all. Sometimes I hear stuff like "Gee, those timbales were cool on that Regee song", or "man thats a clear snare you had on that last tune". The audience likes the overall sound of the band and the Edrums are part of that. Congratulation on your successful gig. Sounds like you guys play some heady tunes. Here is wishing you many more good gigs!

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    • #3
      Thanks for the words of encouragement!

      I think one reason I got the reactions I got had to do with the fact that probably nobody in the audience had ever seen edrums before. I think there was a "wow, didn't know drums could be electric" factor.

      And we work exceedingly hard on our sound.

      www.myspace.com/rubberuniverse
      TD-12, DTX502, SD1000, EZDrummer, Diamond Drum 12" snare, S1000 toms/cymbals/kick, PCY10/100/135/155, CY-5/14, Hart Ride, Hart Acupad 8" kick, Epedal Pro II, Concept 1 pads/cymbals, SD1000 & Roland V Sessions racks, PD-7, Kit Toy 10" splash, DMPad ride, SamplePad, PerformancePad Pro

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by grog View Post
        we have an appalling amount of gear for a bunch of posers
        I think this statement should be adopted as the official Vdrums.com motto.

        Seriously, great story, grog. Thanks for sharing, and we'd love to see some video clips of your band in action.
        >>>See my E-kit here<<<

        >>>See my A-kit here<<<

        Comment


        • #5
          We have video of the gig--I haven't watched any of it yet.

          The kicker is that the rest of the band is really really really touchy about posting anything that isn't just the bestest, absolutely awesomeness of any given song. As such, it's impossible to post anything.

          We'll see.

          And yeah, I think I've stumbled onto our official motto.

          www.myspace.com/rubberuniverse
          TD-12, DTX502, SD1000, EZDrummer, Diamond Drum 12" snare, S1000 toms/cymbals/kick, PCY10/100/135/155, CY-5/14, Hart Ride, Hart Acupad 8" kick, Epedal Pro II, Concept 1 pads/cymbals, SD1000 & Roland V Sessions racks, PD-7, Kit Toy 10" splash, DMPad ride, SamplePad, PerformancePad Pro

          Comment


          • #6
            Nice. Similar experience on my end. A buddy of mine sent me a file of a guitar/bass song that he put together. Originally it had a drum loop on it (this is going back about a year and a half and this is what got me going on e-drums, essentially the reason I bought my TD6). I was blown away by how professional it sounded.

            So finally I spent the last few days going over my drum part for the "song", and I did about 3 takes over this past weekend. I even added a separate track for a tambourine.

            Anyway so I email him the current status (I am still tweaking my part and owe him a final cut this week). His brother comes over and is told the story before he hears the clip, and I guess is expecting the drums to sound like MC Hammer or Kris Kross! I'm laughing. So we play the clip and he can't believe those are E-Drums! They really sound great.

            So my buddy asked me to add just a touch more 'verb to the drum mix , and to add some cowbell. We had a laugh at that last part. "I have a fever for more cowbell".

            Once I am happy with the final product I will post.

            Comment

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