Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How much do gigging drummers change kits

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How much do gigging drummers change kits

    I've now setup via a momentary type footswitch to the right of my kick pedal (plugged into the MIDI Expression input of my second eDRUMin) to cycle through 8 Superior Drummer kits I configured. Kit's under 1GB load in about 8 seconds. Kit changes that use the same SDX load slightly quicker. This is using Cantabile "Plugin Snapshots". I can also change just an instrument using eDRUMin "banks" by loading an additional kit piece and setting it's trigger note to a different note. The bank change can swtich the note that gets triggered so the hit gets routed to the other kit piece set to that note. That's happens instantly.

    My question is - how much do gigging "edrummers" change kit sounds?
    Ludwig Accent 5 piece kit | UFO Drums ebridges, 3 ply mesh heads and rim protectors | Yamaha PCY135 on Ludwig stand with DIY hall effect sensor | Yamaha PCY155 ride | DIY Pintech 2 zone crashes with Goedrums piezo's - Myrk membranes| eDRUMin(s) | Cantabile VST host | Superior Drummer 2 and Jamstix kits | Alto TS115a monitors | IK ARC 3

  • #2
    Interesting - I'm looking at this also at the moment - switching a mixture of device kits by MIDI.

    I have a different kit for every song when playing live. This allows me, using the TD-50 kit change to issue the MIDI instruction, to have other devices change kits at the same time. Thus I can relax and know whatever special samples or combination of instruments I have set up for a particular song to be automatically available. Also the Set List on the TD-50 lets me create multiple sets, and if the set order changes I can do this within the TD-50 very quickly and the linked devices will still match the TD-50 kit/song - if I've explained that sufficiently
    TD-50 module, Jobeky Prestige Custom shells, SPD-SX, Nord Drum P3, SPD-30, Paiste Signature cymbals, DW 6000+9000 hardware, Lewitt LCT 140 cymbal mics, Allen & Heath ZED10 mixer, Fohhn Xperience III drum PA, Fohhn XT-33 active speaker drum monitor, Porter & Davies Gigster tactile monitor drum throne

    Comment


    • #3
      I've always changed kits on my gigs, depending on the genre of music. Sometimes even mid-song, or while playing medleys, house music dj-style... That is one of the reasons I've never went for vst for live, as the load times are crucial. That's also why I've opted for the spd-sx to complement the main kit, with it's ability to switch presets while playing samples and loops in the background.
      •A kits: Mapex Saturn ltd. Mapex Meridian, Ludwig and Pearl snares, Paiste, Anatolian, DW5002TW•
      •SPD-SX, Roland RT triggers•
      •Ship kits: TD-12KV, TD-30K, TD-50K•

      Comment


      • #4
        For acoustic sounding e-drums? Never
        also realise that live many sounds sound the same and you often use other (less in quantity and more cutting through) sounds than at home.
        However I have some effects on 1 or 2 pads (claps, dance swooshs, timpany) that make me change kits but the kick, snare, toms stay the same.
        The sound engineer also likes that
        Last edited by puttenvr; 05-29-20, 10:14 AM.
        Robert

        Comment


        • #5
          This is true - I should have said that in my earlier post. Although I change kits for every song mostly the TD-50 sounds are the same - after all it took me hundreds of hours to find a kit sound I liked. I tend to layer in the output from the other devices. I have one TD-50 kit for jazzy gigs and one for rock gigs - they are the same but with different compression and EQ settings.
          TD-50 module, Jobeky Prestige Custom shells, SPD-SX, Nord Drum P3, SPD-30, Paiste Signature cymbals, DW 6000+9000 hardware, Lewitt LCT 140 cymbal mics, Allen & Heath ZED10 mixer, Fohhn Xperience III drum PA, Fohhn XT-33 active speaker drum monitor, Porter & Davies Gigster tactile monitor drum throne

          Comment


          • #6
            I prefer one “perfect” kit, with a few variations for snare & tom tunings. (so I can cover a few different styles/genres) This helps lessen worry of balance issues with a band.
            Alan
            ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            website | youtube | facebook | group | newsletter | message | recommendations

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks for all the answers which, BTW, reinforced my gut feeling that changing kits between songs (rock covers) might throw off listeners as well as the band and sound engineers. I think subtle adjustments like changing the ride bell for a CCR tune (I recently read that Doug Clifford was actually playing the bell on an open 18" hi-hat top) would be ok. I implemented the kit switching just because I could to see how it worked. Rob, the creator of the eDRUMin, implemented note banks which swap out what note the pad or cymbal sends. That is instant if your kit has additional pieces set to those notes. That seems like a better way to go. Get a "perfect kit" dialed in and then add some other sounds or kit piece variations and tap the foot switch to cycle through 4 sets of those.
              Ludwig Accent 5 piece kit | UFO Drums ebridges, 3 ply mesh heads and rim protectors | Yamaha PCY135 on Ludwig stand with DIY hall effect sensor | Yamaha PCY155 ride | DIY Pintech 2 zone crashes with Goedrums piezo's - Myrk membranes| eDRUMin(s) | Cantabile VST host | Superior Drummer 2 and Jamstix kits | Alto TS115a monitors | IK ARC 3

              Comment


              • #8
                There aren't too many acoustic drummers who turn up with 2-3 drum kits to a gig. For recording an album, often the drums and cymbals remain the same but perhaps some recording characteristics might vary from song to song. I'd probably operate my drums in the same way as if I were doing things with an acoustic kit. I doubt I would have a different kit for absolutely every song unless the sounds were drastically different.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I've been using the TD-50 for set lists and changing kits per song so long I'd forgotten until recently the reason I started doing this. It's because each kit has the song Tempo stored with it in the TD-50 Set Lists and I use the TD-50 click into my in-ear monitors to start songs. So you can finish one song, change kit and be ready to tap the band in to the next song.

                  Only down side is that if the guitarist or singer is talking to the audience for a while and my attention wanders, it's (rarely) happened that I can switch kits again - resulting in the wrong Tempo and some strange looks from the band
                  Last edited by willsud; 06-07-20, 05:17 AM.
                  TD-50 module, Jobeky Prestige Custom shells, SPD-SX, Nord Drum P3, SPD-30, Paiste Signature cymbals, DW 6000+9000 hardware, Lewitt LCT 140 cymbal mics, Allen & Heath ZED10 mixer, Fohhn Xperience III drum PA, Fohhn XT-33 active speaker drum monitor, Porter & Davies Gigster tactile monitor drum throne

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I use a laptop as my sound source. For gigs, I basically use one kit, which is a Bonham style kit, and also load a sampler for additional sounds.
                    I only change pad setup note assignments (as Kit presets).
                    That way, everything is loaded once into the laptop, so there is no loading of new kits or sounds.
                    Also, in case of emergency reboots, it makes things simpler and faster.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X