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Need help recording on mac

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  • Need help recording on mac

    Hey guys, hope you can help me-
    In the past I used to easily record my td-9 on my old pc by connecting a simple 3.5" jack cable from the headphones output in the module to the pc mic input. One cable and Audacity is all I needed.
    Well, I tried to do the same on my mac but it doesn't seem to work. I'm assuming the problem is that there's only one socket on the mac that counts as headphones (or as a mic if there's an actual mic connected, I guess). I tried to check the system settings to see if there's a way to make it work as a mic but couldn't find any. When I click to record it simply picks up the room sounds from the built-in mic instead of the drums through the cable.
    What am I doing wrong? Is there even a way at all to make it as simple on the mac as it was on the pc?

  • #2
    It would help to know which Mac you have.

    Some models have a headphones/mic combination in a single 3.5mm port, and some models have headphones only.

    The sounds you are picking up are from the built-in mic of your Mac used for stuff like Facetime or Skype...
    DTX700, eDRUMin 4+10, A2E Dixon kit, Yamaha cymbals, FSR HH
    Kit Pix http://vdrums.com/forum/album.php?albumid=613

    My new venture, HiEnd Speakers. : voglosounds.com

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    • #3
      I have a 15" macbook pro retina display.
      And yeah, like I said, I know the sounds come from the built-in mic (by "room sounds" I meant people talking, tv and all that stuff, so I couldn't get confused there ).. but I was wondering if there's a way to shut it off and record from the headphones port.
      Basically, I need to know if it's still possible to do it the good old way that i'm used to. All I have at the moment is that two sided 3.5" male cable so i'm really counting on it.
      It'd be nice to know what's the next simplest way to record though, just in case i'll have no choice.

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      • #4
        Apple Menu -> System Preferences -> Sound -> Input Tab -> lower part: "Use audio port for:" -> select "Sound input".

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        • #5
          I don't have such an option :/

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          • #6
            Yep, the MBP retina does not have the combination line in / line out port.

            Your only way will be to add a USB interface.

            It can be something as cheap as a ART USB DualPre at $80 (I have one and it works really well for the price) or the M-Audio M-Track USB 2 channels at $80 (bonus, it also has MIDI in/out, that's cool!) to something like a Focusrite 2i2 at $150 or a M-Audio
            DTX700, eDRUMin 4+10, A2E Dixon kit, Yamaha cymbals, FSR HH
            Kit Pix http://vdrums.com/forum/album.php?albumid=613

            My new venture, HiEnd Speakers. : voglosounds.com

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            • #7
              Originally posted by perceval View Post
              Yep, the MBP retina does not have the combination line in / line out port.

              Your only way will be to add a USB interface.

              It can be something as cheap as a ART USB DualPre at $80 (I have one and it works really well for the price) or the M-Audio M-Track USB 2 channels at $80 (bonus, it also has MIDI in/out, that's cool!) to something like a Focusrite 2i2 at $150 or a M-Audio
              Yup, this is the way to go. I have a 2010 Macbook pro and don't have to record it this way but I do use a Focusrite as well and it's very user friendly.
              Roland TD-30KV, Alesis Strike Pro Kit, Tama HW, QSC K10x2, Logic Pro, Toontrack Superior Drummer 3, Focusrite Clarett 4Pre Thunderbolt Interface

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              • #8
                These things scare me just by the way they look lol seems like a lot is going on with these units.
                Can you give me a brief explanation of how they work, please? like what cables are actually needed?

                I appreciate your help guys. I could have gone days and days banging my head against the wall trying to figure out why the old trick doesn't work anymore.

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                • #9
                  I have an older MBP. It has a two way input/output. But not at the same time.
                  I use one of these. https://store.griffintechnology.com/imic

                  You plug it into a USB. It gives you a mic in and headphone out at the same time.
                  It also adjusts line levels, in case you use an XLR mic to record with.

                  It's only $40 on amazon.


                  Originally posted by red4u View Post
                  These things scare me just by the way they look lol seems like a lot is going on with these units.
                  Can you give me a brief explanation of how they work, please? like what cables are actually needed?

                  I appreciate your help guys. I could have gone days and days banging my head against the wall trying to figure out why the old trick doesn't work anymore.
                  __________________________________________________
                  https://soundcloud.com/loudspoken
                  https://www.facebook.com/richardsosborn
                  Logic Pro X, Roland SPD-30, Roland SPD-SX

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                  • #10
                    Red4u, let me just poke you a little bit: I'm going to show you a picture....



                    ...now tell me, what it is exactly that scares you about this?
                    Everything can be explained!


                    "My best friends' name is J-SON. They used to call him 'Mr. Parse.' He has an 'Error'..!"

                    http://www.vdrums.com/forum/core/cus...ar33631_4.jpeg

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                    • #11
                      rsosborn, thanks, i'll look into it as well.


                      hairmetal-81, that thing has it's back side as well. I'm sure it's super easy to use but I pretty much have zero understanding at recording methods so when I look at it all I see is a million ports. That's like gibberish to me… I have no idea which one/s I need to use. Very noobish of me, I know, but I never had to be bothered with it as long as I had my old pc.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by red4u View Post
                        hairmetal-81, that thing has it's back side as well. I'm sure it's super easy to use but I pretty much have zero understanding at recording methods so when I look at it all I see is a million ports. .

                        Ahh, so you're scared of backsides?

                        Don't be! - Look:


                        An USB-port, ....and two line-outputs for left and right.
                        That's all! Easy-peasy!





                        HTH


                        "My best friends' name is J-SON. They used to call him 'Mr. Parse.' He has an 'Error'..!"

                        http://www.vdrums.com/forum/core/cus...ar33631_4.jpeg

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                        • #13
                          haha ok, the one i've encountered on google looked a little scarier a different model probably.
                          So what are those on the front for? what are you supposed to connect there?

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                          • #14
                            Hold on... got to get that picture again....



                            Abracadabra! There it is again!



                            Okay, let's go through the front panel, bit by bit, starting at the left end:

                            [-] The first thing you'll see, is the input-connector of Channel 1. It is funky looking, because it allows you to connect both, an XLR-cable for microphones, or a normal jack-cable for line signals.
                            Audio-buffs refer to this 'combination input' as 'Combo-Jack'.

                            [-] Next you'll see a metal switch with two settings, labelled 'Line' and 'Inst'.
                            This switch is kind of a course adjust for input-levels. This switch only affects a plugged-in jack-cable, it doesn't affect the XLR-microphone-input. According to what you have connected, set the switch to the appropriate position: Line for a line signal, eg. a drum-module, Inst: for an instrument like a guitar

                            [-] The last control in this group is a rotary-knob labeled 'Gain'. This is where you can fine-adjust the input-level. It affects both XLR- and jack-input.


                            Most interfaces have an indicator of some sorts, to inform the user if the input-level is in check. A speciality of the Focusrite interface is the colored ring around the gain-knob. It shows you if the gain-levels are set correctly:

                            Green means 'everything's okay'
                            Orange means 'uh-oh, careful'
                            Red means 'avoid'

                            You'll notice the ring around the first knob here lights RED, meaning the input is distorting, and you should back the gain-knob down some!




                            |
                            |
                            |




                            After the first white, vertical line, you'll notice another section, a second group of controls, exactly mirroring the controls described above.

                            This section holds the controls for Channel 2, and they work identical to the controls of Channel 1 (combo-jack input, line/Inst-switch, gain-knob with LED indicator)! The ring on Channel 2 is lighting GREEN, so input-levels on this channel are fine!



                            |
                            |
                            |



                            After the second vertical line, we are squarely (with both feet heavily grounded!) inside the 'Master section'. Welcome, partner!

                            While the two previous sections were all about connecting and setting levels for the INPUT-channels, this last section is all about adjusting the OUTPUT side-of-things. The 'Master' section has a few controls more than the previous sections - but don't sweat, we'll slowly examine one after the other!


                            [-] The first thing you'll see in the master-section is a red button that's labeled '48V'.
                            This affects the XLR-inputs on both channels. It delivers the needed current, when you are working with quality condenser microphones.
                            48 volts, from the interface straight to the microphone - Audio-buffs call this 'Phantom-Power'.

                            [-] The most striking control on the front of the whole interface is the huge, white 'Monitor' knob!
                            As you would expect, it controls the output-level that is sent to the 'Left' and 'Right' outputs on the backside of the unit.

                            [-] A quick note about the yellow LED with the USB-symbol: This graphical indicator informs you whether a USB.connection is present.

                            [-] Next up is the smaller white knob next to the big 'Monitor'-knob. It sets the level for the headphones-output, which is independent of the line outputs on the back. Right below it, there's the headphone-jack - connect your headphones here!




                            [-] The last control in the master-section - that I left out intentionally, saving up 'best for last' - is the switch labeled 'Direct Monitor'. It is the most difficult to explain for me, but since it only has two conditions (ON and OFF) it isn't complicated to operate in real-life.



                            What does it do?

                            The easiest way to explain this, is if you imagine an electric guitar plugged into the interface.
                            Let's say all the effects like amp-distortion are coming from your computers' software - including the ever popular reverb- and delay-effects for that huge lead-guitar-solo!

                            If the 'Direct Monitor'-switch is set to the 'OFF'-position, you will hear the signal coming straight out of the computer - a heavy guitar sound, including all the effects!

                            Now, if you set the switch to 'ON', what you will hear isn't the signal from the computer anymore, but the clean, pure guitar-sound, without amp-distortion or any effects. The direct sound of the instrument (that's why it is called 'Direct Monitor'), coming from the interface itself, before the guitar-signal passes the computer and software!


                            What is this good for?
                            Depending on your computer-system and the 'hunger' of the software you are using, there can be a delay between what you play, and what you hear through your speakers.

                            Remember: our guitar-signal has to travel from the interface via USB into your computer, then through all the software, like the amp-simulation and the added effects, before it finally makes its way back to the interfaces' outputs, where you can hear it.
                            Audio-buffs call this delay between played and heard signal 'Latency'.

                            Here is were 'Direct Monitoring' comes in handy - you can hear the signal in real-time, before it hits the computer. This is especially useful when you play an instrument, that is rhythmically delicate ...like Drums!






                            Okay - this was a monster-post, but this little 'Walkthrough' across all the ins and outs of the Focusrite interface (for example-purposes, other interfaces work in a similar way), has hopefully shed some light to the heart of the matter for you!


                            Hope this helps.
                            Last edited by hairmetal-81; 12-11-13, 04:14 PM.


                            "My best friends' name is J-SON. They used to call him 'Mr. Parse.' He has an 'Error'..!"

                            http://www.vdrums.com/forum/core/cus...ar33631_4.jpeg

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                          • #15
                            Wow man, you're great thanks so much for the thorough explanation. That does make things clearer, for sure.
                            Getting smarter by the day here

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