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  • I need advice on edrum or acoustic

    hey,

    I am in a delima. My band's genre is alternative christian rock. V-drums are a good choice for studio and even live shows. But my rutt, is whether it would be more beneficial to pay through the nose for a custom kit made of maple, or just buy the v-session to accomadate all my needs, and i do have experience in playing edrums. I need your opinions.


    I would also like to warrent that I am a pretty agressive drum and I fear breaking the weak "mesh" heads and damaging the electronics inside. Our band is kind of a CREED/POP-ROCK mix. But our sound is very unique. But I want to impove it with a more professional sound. But my lead singer thinks they're dumb, and I've told him that technology allows for better acoustic sounding voices. So I don't know please help.


    Thanx
    A fellow percussionist...

  • #2
    You don't have to worry about destroying the mesh heads or the trigger, unless the heads are tuned very loose. I reckon most edrums are tough enough to withstand some major abuse.

    Also consider that with edrums, you don't have to play as hard to achieve the sound or volume you want.


    [This message has been edited by ufotofu (edited May 31, 2002).]
    Roland TD-20 v1.08, various v-drums and v-cymbals, Yamaha KP65's, Axis pedals, Gibraltar hardware, Mackie 1202/SRM450 (pre-china)

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    • #3
      Go with the V-Drums!

      I had this same delima a year ago and bought a v-session kit. I play in a Christian Rock Band in Central Illinois, and also play hard at times. After working on my sounds and technique, I am convinced I made the right decision. My biggest adjustment was playing the snare. I think Roland could improve the snare drum a bit. I have read on some forum's here that a few people are using a different snare instead of the PD-120. I'm not that dissatisfied with the PD-120 to make the change though.

      I agree with ufotofu's comments.

      One of the biggest advantages about the V-Drums that I enjoy is that I can play with the same intensity and output any volume level. The drums are so quick to set up and set sound for live shows, which the other guys in the band truly appreciate!

      Another benefit I have appreciated is the fact that I am a faster drummer on the V-Drums. My fills are better and double kick work is faster and better. And don't forget....."VERSATILITY"! I can have 50 different drum kits available at one time with the V-Drums vs. 1 with an acoustic set.

      Don't forget though that you need amplification and such with the V-Drums, which is extra dollars. All in all, I personally think the V-Drums are the way to go.

      PS. My Tama acoustics are in their cases.

      Good luck on your decision!

      Start Young, Play Hard, Rock On!!!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by fredinator:
        Another benefit I have appreciated is the fact that I am a faster drummer on the V-Drums. My fills are better and double kick work is faster and better.
        You mean faster on the mesh drums, due to the bounciness of the mesh head? Or faster with edrums in general?
        Roland TD-20 v1.08, various v-drums and v-cymbals, Yamaha KP65's, Axis pedals, Gibraltar hardware, Mackie 1202/SRM450 (pre-china)

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        • #5
          Ditto on what the other guys have said... and add that your lead singer is an idiot.

          Does anyone else in the band feel as he does? If the majority do, you may run into some problems which could eventually cause you to be an ex-drummer in your band. You will read many stories of people changing their opinion once they hear and work with them, but that isn't always the case. Give the rest of the band a smell test before you take the plunge. No matter how good they sound, some people are totally hung up on appearance and pre-conceived notions. You may want to spend some time working on them first. Bands have enough tensions to deal with, ya know what I'm sayin?
          Kit Pic 1 Kit Pic 2 Kit Pic 3... And FOR SALE I have: 3 PD-9's, MDS-10 purple rack w/cables/pad and cym mounts. See classified posts for details or PM me.

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          • #6
            well you might get a year or five years on one mesh head ever do that on an acoustic?also you could play zep style rush style yes police bob marleyall in one set.without getting of yer butt.and finish it by playing steel drums on "jane says"....lol.....what else could ya want?you would have to pa an acoustic kit aswell.unless you were going for that crappy fwap! fwop! fwap! sound.
            -i can levitate birds and no one cares-----------V-CONCERT,CY12H-CY15R/SPD-20-XP-60 V-STUDIO 1824CD,DAUZ PADS,NO RYTHYM AND MISC.CRAP 9"HART SPLASH/AKAI S5000/ASSLOAD OF SAMPLES

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            • #7
              You could also trigger your current acoustic set with a ddrum4. Great amplified sound and still great looks


              ------------------
              My Personal homepage - MPCman's E-drum Picsite! currently with 14 profiles
              Music was my first love...

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              • #8
                Stick with the acoustics. I have been playing V-Drums in my church band for about 4 months now, and I can't stand it anymore. A few weeks ago, we did an event where acoustic drums were already there so I used them. Now I don't want to even look at my V-Drums again.

                I thought learning to play drums (I have been playing for about a year) on an electric set would make me biased towards electric drums, but I find that there is way more expressiveness in acoustics, the band reacts more positively because they are more present on stage, and EVERY time you strike a drum you get a response.

                I am not bitter, and do not want to start a war. If I were playing in a lets-go-to-sleep praise band, well maybe I would stick to the V-Drums. However, we are a rock-n-roll church band, and they just don't work for me / us.

                If you are going to use a V-Drum set, get a real snare and acoustic cymbals. Use the left-over pads for effects.

                I will still be using my V-Drums as a set to practice on at home, but hope I never have to play them live again.

                I have the V-Concert set with the upgraded TD-10, just in case anyone cares.

                Be cool,

                Joe
                V-Concert, Visu-Lite Cymbals, BBE 482's, Behringer Multicom, Alesis D5

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                • #9
                  There are some sick people out there. You put creed and unique in the same post, qua?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by JoeKool:
                    I thought learning to play drums (I have been playing for about a year) on an electric set would make me biased towards electric drums
                    So, did it turn out that way? (Please elaborate.)
                    Roland TD-20 v1.08, various v-drums and v-cymbals, Yamaha KP65's, Axis pedals, Gibraltar hardware, Mackie 1202/SRM450 (pre-china)

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                    • #11
                      As far as being biased, here is what I meant. Most drummers I know, when they hear the word electric or V-drum, they cop an attitude, and won't even try them. Since I was just starting to learn to play, and am open minded electronically (I play keyboards and guitar too), I figured I would learn on the E's and be a defender of the E's.

                      What happened is the opposite. I watch a couple of drummers who do a lot of interesting things with the cymbals, who do things with their toms, and when I try to emulate those things which sound good, well, it can't happen. It is not a limitation of my ability, but the limitation of the E's.

                      It was not till recently when we played an event at the church where I used an acoustic set that all the frustration I had been dealing with became evident. The band members could FEEL the drums and I could do the things I had been wanting to do.

                      I have tried tweaking the kit, spent $$$ on outboard gear to support the kit, and I have had to admit to myself that E's are not for me, and I would not recommend them to anyone who is going to be playing in a rock band. Rock bands need volume, and by the time you add some sort of personal monitoring system that is cranking out 500 watts, well what is the point? Now you are as loud as an acoustic set, but you still can't do what an acoustic set does.

                      Now add into the equation that to get a decent set of E's, with all the outboard gear and amplification, you have spent more money than you would need to buy a very decent set of drums with more cymbals than Mike Portnoy can hit, along with all the mics needed.

                      I do not mean for this to be a bashing session, and I know there are a lot of you guys who stand by your E's, but unfortunately I cannot. They just do not work for me or the band.

                      Harlock, that is so funny. The guys in the band nicknamed me Animal, because I am so active on the drums and my hair goes flying around. That was awesome. You rule.

                      Joe
                      V-Concert, Visu-Lite Cymbals, BBE 482's, Behringer Multicom, Alesis D5

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                      • #12
                        Fair enough. I understand what you mean about technique, presence, and expressiveness. I too have watched other drummers play acoustics and wished I could play the same way on my E's. But without getting back into the A's versus E's debate, let's just say that both have their advantages and disadvantages.

                        I wish I could have an acoustic set myself (in addition to the E's), but I don't see that happening until I buy a house.
                        Roland TD-20 v1.08, various v-drums and v-cymbals, Yamaha KP65's, Axis pedals, Gibraltar hardware, Mackie 1202/SRM450 (pre-china)

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                        • #13
                          Not going to go with A's vs. E's battle, here, but I can assure you, I hit awfully freakin' hard, especially playing live, and am still on the original mesh heads that came with my kit 2 years ago. Don't worry about the pads standing up to heavy hitting.

                          -Danny
                          -Danny

                          Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life.

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                          • #14
                            JoeKool, if you say something bad about the Vdrums, a few narrow minded people put a knife in your back. You should be aware of this.

                            Although I do not agree with you - JoeKool - I can understand what you say. It's your experience, your opinion. And that's okay.
                            Robert

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                            • #15
                              Thanks Putt. I tried them and wanted them to work. They look cool and do cool things. I am not saying nobody should play them, they just are not right for me. I may put a few pads on my acoustic set for some effects, who knows.

                              I am keeping my set to practice on, and maybe some day I will have a change of heart.

                              Thanks for the warning too. I guess I will have to use the Force on that one.

                              V-Concert, Visu-Lite Cymbals, BBE 482's, Behringer Multicom, Alesis D5

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