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  • rocketnetwork

    Anyone into this? Here are a couple of links, if you aren't familiar with it: http://www.harmony-central.com/News/...t-Network.html http://www.rocketnetwork.com/indexie.htm

    I posted a mention of it in the general forum but I think it probably got well lost among the surrounding word-slinging. The concept is great and I'm wondering if anyone is exploring the possibilities here who could share some experiences.


  • #2
    Very very cool, Dr K !
    Immensely powerful yet with a liquid cat-quick elegance

    Comment


    • #3
      I've been using Rocket Network along with my other band members to exchange song ideas and sketch out basic arrangements for a little over a year now on an almost daily basis, and also to record parts for sessions for other artists. The network is extremely reliable, albeit a little slow at peak times, especially when working with a lot of audio files. When working with a lot of MIDI data thim isn't much of a problem, and the chat feature is a good help, straightforward and without gimmicky things like 27 different smileys.
      I wouldn't recommend this for anyone with anything less than a 56k modem, but DSL/Cable modem uers should have no problems worth mentioning with it. For producing long-distance I'd say it's a Godsend.
      Digidesign is coming up with a similar network for ProTools users soon, called DigiProNet, which I'm thinking will be based on similar technology.

      Stu
      "Fry that sound effect, Moriarty, we're having it for breakfast"

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      • #4
        Been putting off DSL. (Spend so much time on the road with the lap top and my home PC is pretty average.) Looks like I just found justification.

        I'm really started to sport a little chubby for this computer stuff. Can't wait for the release of Logic 5.0, Logic Control, and the re-release of Houston. Once that happens, I can finalize my choices and order my system. Maybe I'll catch up with you in cyber studio land. A lot of people over the years who have heard me play say I should find myself a good drummer, whatever that means.

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        • #5
          just a thought, dr. k - if you do wind up going the broadband route for the purpose of using rocket, and you intend to use it for audio as well as midi, shop around for a SYNCHRONOUS connection such as SDSL. with an asynchronous connection your upstream speed is greatly reduced compared to your downstream speed and you could easily spend hours uploading beefy audio files.

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          • #6
            Duhhh....Huh? Neophyte alert! What I know about this kind of stuff can be printed on the back of a stamp. Type slowly and use little words. What should I look for in upstream and downstream speeds to get good results? What else should I be sure of? And if possible, who provides the best solution in my area (if anyone knows)? Thanks in advance, I have been researching this, but sounds like you have a good handle on this.

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            • #7
              sorry, it's tough to gauge the nerd quotient on this board sometimes.

              key: 1 Byte = 8 bits
                 mb = megabit, 1024x1024 bits
                 mb = kilabit, 1024 bits
                 MB = MegaByte, 1024x1024 Bytes
                 KB = KilaByte, 1024 Bytes

              ok, there are two kinds of fast internet (broadband) connections on our small planet: synchronous and asynchronous connections.

              an <u>asynchronous</u> connection typically provides for a much faster download speed then upload speed. over 90% of residential broadband packages are asynchronous - earthlink dsl, verizon dsl and att road runner are all asynchronous. typically the download speed is around 1.5 mb/second (roughy 100KB/sec), and upload speeds hover around 100 kb/sec (closer to 10KB/sec). pricing for an ADSL or home cable connection averages around $50/month.

              a <u>sychronous</u> connection gives you the same speeds for uploads as for downloads. so whatever you get down, you get up as well. only problem is that, since this targetted towards businesses, it is much more expensive. 144kb/sec SDSL connections are $129/mo from earthlink biz dsl. 1.5mb/sec SDSL connections are $399/mo. shucks! mercy!

              keep in mind that with a business (synchronous) connection you usually get at least one static IP address for your computer (often several), so you could set up your own website or FTP server, register a name for it and run it from home. drkildrum.com is still available.

              with a home connection, your IP address can change as frequently as every three days. that makes tying a domain name to it pretty much impossible.

              the reason i bring all of this up is that, with a normal home broadband connection (such as earthlink ADSL) it could easily take an hour to upload a 70MB audio file (which is only a few minutes of 16-bit, 44.1khz, stereo audio in wave format) at an upstream speed of 128kb/sec (theoretical max in this case is 74 minutes). something worth thinking about it you want to do a dvd-quality full length album online.

              http://www.dslreports.com is a great resource for finding out more about the specific options in your area.

              peace in the middle east.


              [This message has been edited by digitsone (edited November 02, 2001).]

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              • #8
                Originally posted by digitsone:
                just a thought, dr. k - if you do wind up going the broadband route for the purpose of using rocket, and you intend to use it for audio as well as midi, shop around for a SYNCHRONOUS connection such as SDSL. with an asynchronous connection your upstream speed is greatly reduced compared to your downstream speed and you could easily spend hours uploading beefy audio files.
                & go with Earthlink ADSL or SDSL @49.95/mo. They're based in Atlanta, GA. I have ADSL here in SF, CA thru Earthlink, they're much better than Pacbell & Firstworld (2 ISP/providers I had before coming to E/L).

                ------------------
                Thanx!
                -Alex
                Thanx. Alex & me V's! http://photos.yahoo.com/flexapr

                Comment


                • #9
                  Would a cable modem be better than DSL?
                  Immensely powerful yet with a liquid cat-quick elegance

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by gingerbaker:
                    Would a cable modem be better than DSL?
                    i've had both and i've personally found the cable experience to be slightly better (mediaone cable vs eathlink dsl) but at this point cable and adsl are pretty equivalent. i believe finding a quality service provider is much more important.

                    my personal advice would be to choose a larger provider with good customer service. my first dsl experience was with a small company called iNYC out of brooklyn. it was horrendous. they were basically a reseller of access from a larger provider (covad) and wielded no influence over their network. i paid over $200 to break the contract, which stung, but it was so much better then dealing with their impotent staff.

                    [This message has been edited by digitsone (edited November 03, 2001).]

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by gingerbaker:
                      Would a cable modem be better than DSL?
                      DSL vs. Cable?

                      A Cable Modem is mounted on a nearby telephone pole and routed to all subscribers in your area. It's the very same modem 'box' that supplies Cable (At&t, say) TV to your neighborhood. The more subscribers/users, the more bandwidth that is being used. Of course there are peak times when folks more commonly log on or watch TV. These Cable Modems use fiber optic cables & are cable of sending tons of data @ once. Generally speaking, a Cable connection will provide very high download (the rate @ which you can receive data. & most people 'take' things from other PCs & the internet anyway) speeds, upwards of 1-2MB per minute. Upload (the rate @ which you can send data to other PCs & the internet)speeds are profoundly limited, often to no more than that of a 56k modem. The majority of people don't have a need to send data to folks. If this is you, Cable access would be your best bet. It can usually be bundled with your Cable TV access & thus is cheaper (average cost here in CA. is $39-$45 per mo.) than DSL.

                      DSL: There are 2 types of Digital Subscriber Line. ADSL=Asynchronous or Asymmetrical, meaning your Upload & Download speeds are unequal. ADSL almost always means your download is very good @ the expense of your upload speed (just like Cable access). 95% of DSL users have ADSL, as this is the standard home DSL hookup.

                      SDSL=Synchronous or Symmetrical
                      , meaning your Upload & Download speeds are virtually the same. SDSL is generally more expensive than ADSL. It's often used by Home business users who cant afford a T1, avg. $329/mo. here in SF (Std. business connxion provides 1.5 MB up & down per minute) or a T3, avg. $1000+/mo. here (is equal to 3 T1 connxions all wrapped up as 1 line). T1's & T3's are primarily used by dozens to hundreds of employees on a LAN (LocalAreaNetwork).

                      Anyway, either DSL line is an individual fiber optic, digital phone line that is routed directly from your personal (Pacbell, in my case) phonebox to your telephone pole. The signal then goes to Pacbell's 'Central Office' (your 'C.O.' is the place where your & your neighbor's phone lines & hardware are hooked into a central mainframe). Distance is a factor in selecting either type of DSL. If your are more than 1,800ft. from your phone co's 'C.O.', the signal will be too weak to be of any use. The closer you are to your C.O., the faster your connxion will be. Phone line quality also has an effect on speed. If your phonebox or lines are ancient, speeds will be less than optimal. I experienced this 1sthand when applying for FirstWorld (ISP)/Covad (Installer) ADSL back in Feb. 99'. My phonebox only had a 2 phoneline capacity, which was the old standard. Once my younger bro. decided to get DSL & his own (a 3rd) phone line in our house, Pacific Bell came out and installed a new (capacity=10 total phonelines) phonebox & digital line to our pole. Since then, our ADSL provides consistent speeds of 660k down & 600k+ up @ the Megapath & LinkLine servers (inevitably making it SDSL). We're 8,300ft from our Pacbell CO. FirstWorld & it's assets were bought by EartLink as of 8/01', and all's well with ELink. Typically good ADSL speed could be 900k or more down & say 128k up. Upload speeds are often 'capped' to 128k by your isp to limit bandwidth usage.

                      DSL is usually more stable & consistent. Cable's fluctuates with traffic but your downloads can be as high as 8MB/min! My bros. & peeps agree that DSL is a tad better (stablity & uploads) for online MultiPlayer gaming & Cable Access would be better for the home user who does a lot of downloading Mp3s, etc. Altough I had no problem getting 1,300+ Mp3s from Napster @ light speed last year. I now use Audio Galaxy just as efficiently.

                      Our DSL is $49.95 per mo. + $15. per month for a 'static' (i.e. permanent, fixed) IP address. So you can see DSL is a tad more $$ than Cable. Oh, & both Cable & DSL are 'always on' so there's no need to dialup or connect.

                      All of my Bay Area friends have either Earthlink or Pacbell ADSL or SDSL or At&t Cable & all are Happy.

                      Here's a great link to determine your actual bandwidth to a local, potent server that's set up for just such use: http://www.dslreports.com/stest/0. [b] Make sure you use the 1 of 3 servers that's closest to you. Megapath in San Jose, Ca., LinkLine in Los Angeles, Ca., & the 3rd is in New York but only available after hours to me. Checking the 'Verbose' box provides much detail.

                      Ok. Did I forget anything?! Sorry for my Rant. Let's post our BandWidth speeds, eh Gang?

                      663 down & 606 up today, Bye.

                      ------------------
                      Thanx!
                      -Alex
                      Thanx. Alex & me V's! http://photos.yahoo.com/flexapr

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        all good points, alex.

                        the only other factor i can think factors to consider in the case of DSL is the quality of the copper phone wire in your building. i lived in a 200 year old brooklyn brownstone when i had dsl and i am certain that the line noise caused by bad copper was an issue. those of you with newer houses won't have to worry about this.

                        sorry for turning this into a broadband post!

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                        • #13
                          Tried the link... results:
                          Down - 3358kbps
                          Up - 73kbps

                          AT&T cable modem. FWIW, like has already been detailed to some extent, AT&T limits upstream speeds to a maximum of 128k, which is typical of cable modem providers. Cable modem systems work on a "shared bandwidth" principle, whereby multiple users divide up a fixed amount of bandwidth on an on-demand "as needed" basis. DSL operates with a fixed amount of bandwidth on a per-subscriber basis, which gives a more stable and predictable bandwidth.

                          For intensive 2-way traffic, DSL is preferred over Cable, since nobody will rob your bandwidth on the way to your point-of-presence. Synchronous DSL, as opposed to ADSL, should provide the best performance in this arena for the good Doctor's uses.

                          DSL is priced by bandwidth package, usually starting with 256kbps, and going to 512, 768, and up to 1.5Mbps, which is equivalent to a true T1 connection in SDSL mode. The only limiting factor, besides your budget, is your physical distance from the nearest point-of-presence, and the quality of the lines in between. Your provider will run a bandwidth test on installation, and can tell you what the highest speed you can order will be.

                          A no-shi+ T1 is the real choice for the serious internet musician, if you're looking to do top-notch session work. Stability, line quality, fewest hops, and compression all dictate that the best result will be achieved through a dedicated line.

                          If you wanna talk about choices, drop me a line via e-mail, Doc, and I'll give you a call. BTW, in case you didn't guess, I'm a regional IT manager by trade...

                          -Danny
                          Not a computer geek, but I play one during the day.
                          -Danny

                          Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life.

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                          • #14
                            Many thanks to all who posted on this link a while back. My DSL gateway has been shipped two day, so I should be up and running by the end of the week. (Just for giggles, I am going to network the computer in my studio now, and my forthcoming [primarily audio specific] computer so I can go head-to-head with friends, associates, clients, whatever on computer games during goof-off time.) Oh, and I may actually put the static IP and much needed speed to some constructive use too. Thanks again all, for the off the mainstream Vdrum path assist.

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