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Recording with Mimic onboard sounds versus triggering VST

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  • Recording with Mimic onboard sounds versus triggering VST

    Hi, I see a lot of talk on these boards about people using Roland modules to trigger sounds from a VST, perhaps most often to Superior Drummer 3. Obviously, this makes sense if you're after more realistic sounds, but what if you already have VST-quality sounds (i.e., Mimic)? Obviously, the module is great for just turning on and practicing, and I could see it being similarly useful for gigging - but what about recording, is there an advantage to triggering a true VST library?

    I can think of several of the top of my head: simpler connectivity (one MIDI cable to audio interface instead of two cable snakes if using all direct outs), and of course the ability to change kits AFTER recording the performance. Are there any disadvantages? Are you able to multitrack over MIDI, and retain the ability to edit voices independently at mixing (that's my primary reason for using direct outs instead of master outs)? I'm just beginning to dabble in the art and science of recording, mixing, and mastering, and still have a long way to go - but I'm just wondering if I'm leaving a lot of editing options on the table by not just going all in on a VST plug-in for my DAW.

    I will probably just download the EZ Drummer 2 demo and give it a go, but thought I'd try to get some basic questions answered while I'm in the process of figuring out the software.

    Thanks.

    EDIT: Oh, one more question - is there less post-processing to do with VST-triggered samples, or is it about the same? Remember the samples come from the Mimic dry, if using direct outs.
    Last edited by MJB; 01-18-20, 01:18 PM.

  • #2
    Here's the "best" and most flexible way to record edrums

    1. Module --> MIDI data --> Software (DAW/Sequencer/whatever the cool kids are calling it these days. I use (now free) Cakewalk.)

    2. Split MIDI data to individual tracks in DAW if you want individual control of all drums / cymbals - usually a simple button push in your software

    3. Tidy up MIDI data as necessary, remove duff notes, change tempo, etc

    4. Send MIDI back to module[*], whilst recording the audio from the module[*] - this can be done track-by-track, or the whole lot at once, depending on the number of audio tracks you want - every instrument, just a stereo mix-down, or anything in between.

    So, now you've got both audio and MIDI. This is most flexible, meaning you can adjust anything in future. Change tempo or instruments or sounds/entire kit, just re-do [3]-[4][*] or to your chosen software synth/VST/whatever the cool kids etc...
    *** Never buy a module without MIDI IN ***
    Yamaha & Roland modules. DTX,TM-2, EC-10, EC10m, SP-404. Multi12. TrapKat. ControlPads. Octapad, SamplePad, Wavedrum. Handsonic. Dynacord RhythmStick. MPC. Paiste 2002/Signatures. Cajons. Djembes. Darbuka. Windsynth. MIDI Bass. Tenori-on. Zoom ARQ. Synths. Ukes.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by electrodrummer View Post
      Here's the "best" and most flexible way to record edrums

      1. Module --> MIDI data --> Software (DAW/Sequencer/whatever the cool kids are calling it these days. I use (now free) Cakewalk.)

      2. Split MIDI data to individual tracks in DAW if you want individual control of all drums / cymbals - usually a simple button push in your software

      3. Tidy up MIDI data as necessary, remove duff notes, change tempo, etc

      4. Send MIDI back to module[*], whilst recording the audio from the module[*] - this can be done track-by-track, or the whole lot at once, depending on the number of audio tracks you want - every instrument, just a stereo mix-down, or anything in between.

      So, now you've got both audio and MIDI. This is most flexible, meaning you can adjust anything in future. Change tempo or instruments or sounds/entire kit, just re-do [3]-[4][*] or to your chosen software synth/VST/whatever the cool kids etc...
      Thanks! Both my module and audio interface have MIDI I/O, I wasn't really sure if I would ever need MIDI going upstream, but it sounds like there's a use for it.

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      • #4
        electrodrummer regarding #2 above. Use drum maps and you don't need to do the splitting out and it is a bunch easier to edit the midi and takes up a lot less track realestate. Takes a little effort to setup but once done, it's done.
        My Updated Website: https://blades.technology

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        • #5
          One thing to watch out for is being lazy and not recording the audio before archiving. I have a few recordings that I did years ago with my Alesis D4 where I never recorded the audio. I resurrected a track not long ago and had to figure out the midi napping and get the sounds right. When doing it right I used to split the midi to different tracks. These days with SD3 once happy I can freeze the plugin. This works great as SD3 has multiple outs so I can have a channel for each part of the kit and pass the project onto others who don’t have SD3. That’s what I do with the band I’m in.
          Roland TD30 module on TD20 kit SD3 with various kits. Pearl Masters Kit, Yamaha 9000RC original natural wood finish. Cymbals from Zildgian Pasite and Sabian. Loads of percussion bits. Cubase and Wavelab always current versions.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Blades View Post
            electrodrummer regarding #2 above. Use drum maps and you don't need to do the splitting out and it is a bunch easier to edit the midi and takes up a lot less track realestate. Takes a little effort to setup but once done, it's done.
            Indeed (was keeping it simple for my cut-n-paste quick guide. There's a lot of things that can be done depending on your personal preferences, DAW of choice, knowledge, etc!)
            Last edited by electrodrummer; 01-21-20, 04:45 AM.
            *** Never buy a module without MIDI IN ***
            Yamaha & Roland modules. DTX,TM-2, EC-10, EC10m, SP-404. Multi12. TrapKat. ControlPads. Octapad, SamplePad, Wavedrum. Handsonic. Dynacord RhythmStick. MPC. Paiste 2002/Signatures. Cajons. Djembes. Darbuka. Windsynth. MIDI Bass. Tenori-on. Zoom ARQ. Synths. Ukes.

            Comment


            • #7
              I use the method electro drummer is referring to using a mimic pro except I don’t run the midi performance Back into the module. I just record the mimic direct outs and the main midi track from ez drummer to my daw. If I want I can explode the main midi track into individual tracks for further processing if necessary in studio one. The benefit of this technique in my opinion is I get a much fuller and crisper drum sound by mixing the Ez drummer midi and mimic tracks together also expands the realm of creativity. As far as which sounds better ez or mimic sounds the ez drummer sounds more processed to my ears.
              Last edited by Bloody Toe; 06-22-20, 07:22 AM.
              Pearl mimic pro drum mod,tama imperial star shells,helensson drum triggers,remo silent stroke and billy blast mesh heads, gen 16 cymbals, L12 digital mixer,studio one 4 daw, Pevey dm 115 for live monitoring, Yamaha dtx 502 module,dtx 900 silicone pads, zoom Zoom L12 digital mixer.

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