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  • New DAW recommendation

    I am new to this forum. I have a set of Roland TD- 25KV drums and want to collaborate with my old bass player to put together some new songs. Problem is that I live in Florida and he lives in Oklahoma. I Know something about drumming but nothing about recording, using DAW software or transferring files to a fellow musician for his input. I am not afraid to jump in and develop new skills, just don't really know the best place to start.

    Any suggestions?

    Thanks!


  • #2
    Start with Reaper. Move when you feel a need for what it cannot provide... which isnít much. Reaper is lightweight, but extremely powerful. Itís far worth the tiny price tag.

    I also use Studio One and enjoy it. Itís got a nicer UI and extra bells ní whistles... for a price.
    Alan
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    • #3
      Reaper is a really good program and works well. If I hadnít have been using Cubase for 30 years then I would probably go this route. If you donít mind spending and you want to collaborate over distance then Cubase has some great features where you can share projects online from within Cubase. I have used this with the band I am in and it works great. You both update the project and the parts will get copied over to the other persons Cubase you are collaborating with.
      Roland TD30 module on TD20 kit SD3 with various kits. Pearl Masters Kit, Yamaha 9000RC original natural wood finish. Cymbals from Zildgian Pasite and Sabian. Loads of percussion bits. Cubase and Wavelab always current versions.

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      • #4
        that's right.. best use the same daw and same .x version.. same sample rate, 44.1/16 bit (but some use 24 bit, depends on your gear)
        i'd sent the .wav files and saved project via google drive .. (just send him a link to your google drive..)
        | Diy Roland/Yamaha e-kit | Sonor/Gretsch a-kit | Zildjian/Sabian/Ufip cymbals

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        • #5
          Thanks for the comments. Great advice. I had read a review or two on Reaper and it sounded good to me, but since I know NOTHING about DAW's I did not feel qualified to make a judgement for myself. I also saw that Studio 1 has a free version, although I am always a bit leery of anything that is "free".

          I plan to run the DAW on an HP laptop running Windows 10, 64 bit. Machine has a Core i5 intel processor and 16 GB RAM (max capacity). I am hoping this platform will have enough bandwidth and speed to handle the DAW. Also, the audio device I will be using on the HP is "Windows Audio". Is that a good interface? Would it be better if I loaded something else to work with the DAW?



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          • #6
            The feature in Cubase means you donít have to send files between you. You can just sync the project and it will pull the files itself. Simple! So donít use windows audio unless you have to. You can try the internal audio interface by using ASIO4ALL which can work well to get low latency but I suggest you go for an external audio interface.
            Last edited by mkok; 01-09-19, 07:59 AM.
            Roland TD30 module on TD20 kit SD3 with various kits. Pearl Masters Kit, Yamaha 9000RC original natural wood finish. Cymbals from Zildgian Pasite and Sabian. Loads of percussion bits. Cubase and Wavelab always current versions.

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            • #7
              Based on the PC specs, I'd recommend Reaper. It'll definitely get the job done.
              Alan
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              • #8
                Cakewalk (Sonar) is now Free

                https://www.bandlab.com/products/cakewalk
                *** Never buy a module without MIDI IN ***
                Yamaha & Roland modules. DTX,TM-2, EC-10m, SP-404. Multi12. TrapKat. ControlPad. Wavedrum. Handsonic. Dynacord RhythmStick. MPC. Paiste 2002/Signatures. Cajons. Djembes. Darbuka. Windsynth. MIDI Bass. Tenori-on. Zoom ARQ. Loads o' synth modules. & some ukes

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                • #9
                  ^ Ha! Beat me to it!!!

                  I'd highly recommend Cakewalk by BandLab. This is essentially SONAR Platinum - and get this, it's free!!!
                  So before buying anything I'd give this freebie a shot and there are a ton of "how to" videos available on YouTube as well as a robust Cakewalk & Sonar forum available.

                  https://www.bandlab.com/products/cakewalk


                  Hardware: TD20SX --> Roland UA-25EX --> MSI GT780DX w/ i7 2670, 16-GB of Ram, Windows 7
                  Software: Superior Drummer 2.0, Metal Foundry SDX, Metal Machine EZX, Toontrack Solo - - Sonor X1 Studio - -

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                  • #10
                    There is a free Pro Tools: https://www.avid.com/pro-tools-first
                    One thing to consider is what you plan on doing later and who it will be with. All the DAW's are good but I would spend the time learning something that is used more universally. This will make project sharing much easier later. I spent years on Cubase then had to learn Pro tools. Pro Tools has a lot more free instructional videos which is something to consider. There are alot of amazing mixing videos by top engineers and almost all of them are in Pro Tools. The techniques could be applied to other DAW's.

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                    • #11
                      I have both Cakewalk by Bandlab and Studio One 4. I have a lot more experience with the Cakewalk line (previously Sonar), but recently switched over to Studio One when Gibson "ended" the Cakewalk brand - later revived by Bandlab and now free, as mentioned above.

                      I like both, but righ tnow, I prefer Studio One Pro. It's an expense though, so that' definitely a factor for some, especially if you are just getting started. It's hard to beat a FREE product, like Cakewalk by Bandlab, especially since it is a very capable system and even though it's a very deep program that has a fairly steep learning curve possible (not really any worse than others and many would say easier than Reaper to get your head around), it's a pretty easy program to do the basics with. Again, that "free" factor, especially when sharing with a friend can be attractive.

                      You should download a demo of Studio One and see which one is easier to get into though. I think there is a LOT of Studio One that is more intuitive, easier to look at, easier to navigate, and overall a bit more intuitive for someone who has no experience with a DAW at all, in my opinion.

                      Hope that helps.
                      My Updated Website: https://blades.technology

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                      • #12
                        I'm similar to Blades.

                        I used Sonar for about 15+ or so years... since the early 00's. I loved it back then.

                        Over the years, it just got cluttered, and I loathed it more and more. My needs simplified, and I just went to Sound Forge for a while.

                        Then, I tried Reaper a few times over the past decade. About two years ago, I got serious about looking for a new DAW. I immediately checked into Sonar, but nothing had changed. (to me, anyway)

                        So, I tried ProTools. Couldn't stand it either. "First" is reeeeally watered down. So much so, that it's not really usable, IMO. Of course, I've used my friend's full blown PTs, so I guess knowing the difference really made me just say; meh, not worth that much.

                        So, I decided to give Reaper a true go. Honestly, it's an amazing DAW. It is CONSTANTLY updated and VERY well supported. It's super lightweight, and very robust for $60. For those with a little vanity, there are endless themes, and you can create your own.

                        In the end, I still wanted something more "professional". So, I gave Studio One 3 a shot. At first, I was on the fence; but as I used it more and more, it became the new breed for me. It's extremely easy to use. (like Reaper) I pulled the trigger when 4 came out.

                        Reaper is the 'bang for the buck' go-to. Studio One is if you just want a little more robust -plus- some bells n' whistles. (quality plugins)

                        If you're the kind that likes to purchase plugins once and for all, (ie: Waves n' done) Reaper is just fine. I'm currently using the Slate bundle, so I like SO4 a little better now. About the only limitation I remember from Reaper was plugin support has a few limits.

                        My experience, FWIW.
                        Alan
                        -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        website | youtube | facebook | group | newsletter | twitter | message
                        -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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                        • #13
                          Thanks to all. You guys have given me a lot of food for thought and enough to get started on.

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                          • #14
                            As the others said, free is always good, especially when it's good enough!
                            It's worth checking it out. Myself, it never clicked with Reaper, so I looked elsewhere.

                            Just to throw in another option, much cheaper that Studio One, is Harrison Mixbus.
                            I fell in love with that one, after switching around with Logic, Studio One and Reaper.

                            There's something that appeals to me in Mixbus. Liking the product goes a long way into learning more about it.
                            There is a free demo, and the license costs only $79.

                            https://harrisonconsoles.com/site/mixbus.html

                            Good luck!
                            DTX700, A2E Dixon kit, Yamaha cymbals, FSR HH Kit Pix

                            My new venture: voglosounds.com

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                            • #15

                              Thanks for the recommendation perceval. I already bought Reaper based on some of the other recommendations above. I am going to see how I mesh with that DAW. Appreciate your insight. I will add Harrison Mix bus to the list of possible alternates. As I get some experience I might want to change horses and try something different. Again, thanks for the input.

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