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Tried DIY kit with proper sizes. What a difference!

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  • Tried DIY kit with proper sizes. What a difference!

    I've been experimenting with e-drums over the last few years and have played on quite a few kits, from low-end to high-end. Yesterday, I played a DIY kit with proper drum sizes. I truly didn't realize just what a difference this makes. The kit was 14 SD, 10 RT, 12 RT, 16 FT, and 20 BD. Using the 14 inch snare drum on its own made a tremendous difference. Finally rim shots feel correct and there's enough playing surface. Ditto for the rack toms. And, when moving between acoustic and electronic drums as I do, the spatial characteristics of the DIY e-kit were effortless whereas my small Roland pads take adjusting to every time. Maybe this is the same realization one makes when trying VSTs for the first time as compared with modules? Whatever the case, I already know what my next e-drum upgrade will be... DIY proper size pads! It really does make a big difference! Has anyone else experienced this?


  • #2
    I like the 10" and 12" pads on the bigger Roland kits. Those fell pretty natural. A PDX-6 doesn't feel very natural to me. And small snare drums don't feel natural to me. That's why I really like my Hart 13" snare over the PD-128s. I have not tried a 14" electric snare though. One day I will give it a try.

    I mostly like the look of an acoustic kit over any electric kit produced by the big manufacturers. Yeah the TD-30KV is a great looking kit, but put it next to an acoustic kit and sadly it just can't compete in the looks department. Full sized drums with beautiful finishes are just a spectacular sight.
    I think my work is done here.

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    • #3
      Oh Yes! ...experienced this for sure!

      It's pretty hard going back to smaller (I refrain from using the term 'toy-ish'...) setups afterwards...
      This has an enormous effect on the 'look and feel' in the same vain that VSTs have on 'sound'. You sure have to watch it not being 'snobish' towards anything less, after you've had the pleasure to witness what the 'major league' plays and looks like - ...the big step ...a true 'instrument' in its' own right!

      .
      .
      Greetings from Switzerland,
      - Dänoh



      "My best friends' name is J-SON. They used to call him 'Mr. Parse.' He has an 'Error'..!"

      http://www.vdrums.com/forum/core/cus...ar33631_4.jpeg

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      • #4
        After going the whole Roland route with the td 9 15 and 30 , I finally converted my 47 year old Ludwigs into an electronic kit with a 2 box module which IMO is the best sounding module out there right now and I love it. I personally will always play electronics but only on full sized drum shells. Nothing against Roland or any other e kit! Glad I started with the Roland's because it got me back to my Ludwigs again. The way so look at it is this. If I can play on real drums and take advantage of tons of different drum sounds, and do this quietly in a second floor condo, I am winning all the way around. I bought bfd 3 and superior drums and addictive drums and with these my Ludwigs can play Dw , Tama, Gretsch, pork pie just to name a few!

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        • #5
          Absolutely! I converted 2 cheap sets of Sonors a couple of years ago and left the shells full depth. Dbl 20"kicks, 1-14" snare, 2-10", 2-12" toms and 2-14" floor toms. Just my longing for an a-kit again maybe, but it made a HUGE difference. It's amazing how different everything feels and responds. After probably a year of not playing them I was just thinking about setting them back up, but man, now they look tiny compared to my Gretsch with 26"kick, 13" tom and 16"and 18"floor toms. Oh no? LOL

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          • #6
            We've seen a HUGE increase in DIY kits over the past 6 months or so. Dealers are starting to take notice, and we are getting quite a few of them to convert kits on their floor, and to also sell the conversion kits. Our kit at NAMM was a huge success, and it was a full A2E conversion kit. Nothing feels better

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            • #7
              On smaller diameters the mesh head can get tight and with less rebound / closer to the head of an A snare.
              Although I still prefer my 14" snare ...
              electronic drum triggers >>> | electronic cymbals >>>

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              • #8
                had that feeling a long time
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                .

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                • #9
                  Absolutely agree with what they say: "the bigger the better!".

                  I started my e-drumming with a Simmons set years ago. While it fit the bill for a quieter way to bang on the drums, it left much to be desired. Not only the size of the small pads, but the rubber pads themselves. I sold the set and decided to go acoustic. Bought a set of DW Performance which are great. However, since all my drumming is done for my home studio, it became a pain to mic. After much research, I decided Roland was in my future. I wound up buying a DIY set that was built around the TDW-20 and a TD-12 frame. The snare is 12", the toms are all 10's and the bass is a 14. With the amount of room I had to work with in my studio, it was if the guy had built the set for me. Sure, I'd love 12's for the "floor toms", but having this set turned out to be the greatest thing for me!

                  BIGGER IS BETTER!
                  Roland TDW-20 Frankenstein kit: TDW-20 Module, TD-12 Rack. 1 PD-125 Snare, 4 PD-105 Toms, 1 KD-120 Kick, 1 CY-12 Cymbals, 3 CY-8 Cymbals, 1 VH-12 Hi-Hat, DW-9000 Remote Hi-Hat Controller, DW-5002AD3 Double Bass Pedal, Roc N Soc Nitro Rider Throne, Homemade Drumstick Holder.

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                  • #10
                    Yep....Best of both worlds I've always said. I doubt I'll ever buy factory pads. I have built almost every size DIY pad that would come in an A kit. They all feel and respond great....not to mention that they absolutely blow the doors of most factory brand pads in aesthetic appeal.
                    8 piece DIY Acrylic, 2x2Box DrumIt5, Gen16 4xDCP, DIY Acrylic&Gen16 Conversions, Sleishman Twin-QuadSteele hybrid, Gibraltar&DrumFrame rack, DW9502LB, Midi Knights Pro Lighting
                    http://www.airbrushartists.org/DreamscapeAirbrushRealm

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                    • #11
                      I would love to go with DIY shells or pre made and make my e-kit the same size and layout as my A kit, however, one advantage of my ekit: I can fit a massive amount of drums and cymbals in a smaller rack footprint. While I love the roominess of my A kit, one advantage of my e kit will keep me hanging onto it for years to come....size matters lol.

                      K ;-)
                      My bands: Alter Ego, Arcanum
                      E Kit = Roland TDW-20s kit // Roland SPD-S// Pearl Demon Drives//
                      A Kit = Tama Swingstar 5 pc (1981) w/roto toms (orig owner!) //Zildjians
                      A Kit = Natal 6 pc with Paiste 2000 & Zildjian/MidiKNights/DrumSplitters

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                      • #12
                        This thread is getting my so much more excited about my own A2E project! Hopefully I'll get me the drumkit itself in a couple of days, after that I'll just need to get... everything else, except the module, got that one.

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