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rules of ... er ... guidelines for drumming - drum teachers

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  • rules of ... er ... guidelines for drumming - drum teachers


  • #2
    Hi nutha,

    Good idea for a thread and I'm sure a useful list could be built up.

    Whilst I'm not a drum teacher, I don't really agree with 2 of your "rules"

    "Try to always end a fill with the left hand (if you are right handed)"
    - this is fine as a general guideline for standard layout kits and high to low fills but doesn't take reverse fills or non-standard kits into account

    "Always play the bass drum when hitting a crash"
    - just can't go with this one - there are so many times when just a crash by itself adds more subtle "beauty" to the song

    Comment


    • #3
      This is going to be an interesting thread, I am truly looking forward to the answers of teachers to find out what I need to take note of as well. Thanks for bringing it up Jason.
      VDrums:

      AKit:


      @ www.youtube.com/XothermeK

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by nutha jason View Post
        - Always play the bass drum when hitting a crash.
        Ummm... there are plenty times when the snare goes well with a crash!
        VDrums: a cluster of bits including TDW-20 and TD-3 modules, KD-85, PD-85(2), PD-8(5), CY-12(3), CY-8(2), CY-5(3), Kit Toys china, all on an MDS-6SL+ rack, SPD-S, VEX, VDL
        ZDrums: a Zendrum ZCSZX
        ADrums: an eight piece Tama Rockstar kit with lots o' Zildjians
        Gender-Conflicted Drums: a stock PDP Chameleon with a few Zildjians (a conversion just waiting to happen... then it can go both ways!)

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Hercules View Post
          "Always play the bass drum when hitting a crash"
          - just can't go with this one - there are so many times when just a crash by itself adds more subtle "beauty" to the song
          This one had me a bit puzzled as well. I can understand in the very beginning of drum set learning to make this recommendation, an maybe that's what it is there for....
          But I love to hit off-beat accents with the crash and snare, or go crash-crash, with the kick only on the second of the two. Many others but those were the first two I thought of.....

          Comment


          • #6
            I'm with the others on the crash "guideline"...I find only hitting the crash with the bass boring.

            I've always approached music as if there are no rules of guidelines. I don't want to be a clone of anyone else. To me, it's all about feel and expression.

            ***Disclaimer***
            I certainly am not a teacher, so the above is merely opinion, speculation and hearsay...and of course it could be totally wrong, in which case...disregard.
            My Kit's Evolution Pics...

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by nutha jason View Post
              ... - Always play the bass drum when hitting a crash.
              ...
              I'm not a drum teacher, but I have a thought here. I remember when I was starting drums that there were a number of drummers in the school bands that were playing rock music and coming out of a fill on measure four to land on beat one with a "naked" crash (no bass drum) and then continuing the grooving with snare on beats two and four. Band conductor just cringed ...

              While I think either a naked crash or a crash with a snare, etc. have their place, there is something to be said about filling in the sound with the bass drum strike (e.g., in the situation I described).

              So maybe the guideline you've cited has some implicit assumptions on style of music, context, and general rules (which don't always apply) ...

              Steve
              Roland TD-12, 4-piece kit (very downsized) setup
              http://www.vdrums.com/forum/attachme...0&d=1180324146
              Gretsch New Classic, Yamaha & Ludwig snares
              Agop SE, Vintage A Zildjian, K, K Custom Dark, Sabian HHX Legacy
              DW Hardware

              Comment


              • #8
                I was just thinking of one that I tell my son all the time, "Don't grip the sticks all the way at the very ends."

                Steve
                Roland TD-12, 4-piece kit (very downsized) setup
                http://www.vdrums.com/forum/attachme...0&d=1180324146
                Gretsch New Classic, Yamaha & Ludwig snares
                Agop SE, Vintage A Zildjian, K, K Custom Dark, Sabian HHX Legacy
                DW Hardware

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by nutha jason View Post
                  - Your toes must never leave the top of the bass pedal board.
                  "Never" is a strong word. That assumes you only use one pedal per foot. I'm out immediately!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I would like to add my perspective to this. As a former professional photographer, we were brought up through the ranks as students with various rules of composition, exposure, processing, etc. Once we learned these rules, we learned when they should be broken. A quote I dished out to my dad when he pointed out a "rule" I had broken goes like this: "Education provides the rules. Experience shows you the exceptions". Many of you guys are very experienced, so these rudimentary rules may not apply to you at your more advanced stage, but I think Nutha is looking for the things you tell the noobs to keep them from developing bad habits and bolster the good practices.

                    So, yes, I would tell a beginning drummer to keep his foot on the pedal toward the top of the pedal.

                    Other rules I would give a begining drummer:

                    -Take a pair of sticks and a portable practice pad with you wherever possible.
                    -Devote at least 20% of your practice time to developing your weaker limbs.
                    -Practice with a metronome for no less than 70% of your total practice time. (Playing along with a pro recording counts.)
                    -Your practice material should be at least two levels of difficulty above your performance demands.
                    -Try many different brands and types of sticks before choosing a favorite.
                    -To become a good drummer, you must become a good musician.
                    -To become a good musician, you must learn about as many different kinds of music as possible.

                    Is this the kind of thing you had in mind, Nutha?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by stickinthemud View Post
                      -Take a pair of sticks and a portable practice pad with you wherever possible.
                      This is a great idea if what you're trying to do is get the rest of the world pissed off at you!

                      I had a friend back in college who took a pair of sticks and a pad everywhere. If a bunch of us went out for coffee in the evening, there he was, doing rudiments on the restaurant table. It was irritating and I'm a drummer. I can't imagine what the other guys were thinking (well, actually I can as I heard a few snide comments at other times when he wasn't around). It is possible to take a good idea too far.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        My 'favourite' things are:

                        -Keep your wrists over!
                        and
                        -Don't point your fingers up the sticks

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by JimFiore View Post
                          This is a great idea if what you're trying to do is get the rest of the world pissed off at you!

                          I had a friend back in college who took a pair of sticks and a pad everywhere. If a bunch of us went out for coffee in the evening, there he was, doing rudiments on the restaurant table. It was irritating and I'm a drummer. I can't imagine what the other guys were thinking (well, actually I can as I heard a few snide comments at other times when he wasn't around). It is possible to take a good idea too far.

                          Yes, I agree. The practice pad going with you everywhere is a great idea, as you will find many APPROPRIATE moments, minutes or hours at the most unexpected times. I have had the same experience as Jim, but it tends to be in doctors waiting rooms. on buses etc. If you are unsure if it is an APPROPRIATE place to whip out your pad and sticks ask yourself this question.......'Would a fart be appropriate right now'.
                          I dont know if you can re word that for your wall poster.
                          Great idea for a thread, thanks

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            [/QUOTE]
                            --Practice with a metronome for no less than 70% of your total practice time. (Playing along with a pro recording counts.)
                            -To become a good drummer, you must become a good musician.
                            -To become a good musician, you must learn about as many different kinds of music as possible.

                            [/QUOTE]

                            Woops messed up my quote...see above message
                            Last edited by chef boyardee; 12-08-08, 08:14 AM.
                            Lou




                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1GsB530PL5E


                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VEope5aaDnk


                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_BCo3...e=channel_page


                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KRjIf...e=channel_page

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by stickinthemud View Post
                              -Practice with a metronome for no less than 70% of your total practice time. (Playing along with a pro recording counts.)
                              -To become a good drummer, you must become a good musician.
                              -To become a good musician, you must learn about as many different kinds of music as possible.
                              These are especially great...wish I had a teacher hammering these home in the beginning. I would also add something like "Play with other musicians as much as possible". This would give the student the experience needed to know when to brake the rules like "bass drum and cymbal together" etc.
                              Lou




                              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1GsB530PL5E


                              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VEope5aaDnk


                              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_BCo3...e=channel_page


                              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KRjIf...e=channel_page

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