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Peggy Sue, Paradiddles, Accents and Rolls

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  • Peggy Sue, Paradiddles, Accents and Rolls

    It's been suggested we include Peggy Sue in the set list, and the guitarist (in good humour) said I might want to get practising now so it's ready for our next rehersal.

    I'm all for songs that don't include a single snare drum beat, and it got me thinking of what Jerry Allison's actually doing in that song.

    On first listening it appears to be a straight 16th note pattern with accents:


    _____1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a

    _____>_______>_______>_______>______
    tom__L R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R

    bass_|_______|_______|_______|______


    But then in a book I saw it written as a paradiddle:
    >_______>_______>_______>______
    L R L L R L R R L R L L R L R R

    (the notation here favours my left hand, but of course you could start with the right)


    The only advantage I can see with a paradiddle is that the accents alternate between the left and right hand, so dynamically it's more "even".

    And this got me thinking that the only difference between a single stroke roll and a paradiddle on a single drum is the sticking. Should they sound the same?

    I don't think they do, but this may be a trick of my mind. Or it could be I can pick up the subtle timing differences (I don't think I'm much off) between a LL and a LR.

    Or am I thinking about it too much?

    BTW, I might just set the mesh snare pad to a tom so it's easier to play - or does the TD6 have a snare with "snare off" (that's what it sounds like in the song)?
    Still miss you baby, but my aim's gettin' better...

  • #2
    Something that may help - Sandy Nelson did an instrumental cover of Peggy Sue in the 1960s with drums more or less featured in the song.

    Here are 2 links that include a selection for a song demo:

    http://music.yahoo.com/release/58084576

    or

    http://www.amazon.com/Peggy-Sue/dp/B00163R9QI

    Perhaps listening to that, and the full song, could give you a better interpretation from a drummer's perspective.
    Hart Pro 6.4 (Hammered Chrome), Roland TD-8, Gibraltar Throne w/ Backrest, Tama Iron Cobra Bass Pedal, ALTEC A7-500 "Voice of the Theatre" Speaker/Horn System with Sunn Concert Slave amp and lot of other audio stuff, Sony MDR-7506 Headphones, Zildjian DipSticks - and Czech Skorpian, Heckler & Koch MP5, etc Submachine Guns to stick out the window behind my kit for some quite unique fills...

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    • #3
      I actually did some research into this once. Buddy Holly used many drummers live and all of them played Peggy Sue as straight 16ths, except for Jerry Allison who played it as paradiddles. The recording was Jerry Allison also. I am not sure why he did it, but to be authentic to the recording - paradiddles.
      sigpic

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      • #4
        Thanks for the replies.

        Some Day Grey, on the sample it doesn't appear Sandy Nelson plays any toms or any 16th note pattern at all.

        Michael, thanks for the clarification. Of course, paradiddles and 16th notes aren't mutually exclusive - I would play and count a paradiddle as 1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a... but I get what you're saying - paradiddle as opposed to straight 16ths.
        Still miss you baby, but my aim's gettin' better...

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        • #5
          Peggy Sue

          I have a vague recollection of an interview where I heard that the song would be named for the drummer's girlfriend if he could play the paradiddles through the whole song.

          What stuck out to me in this interview was that he was using paradiddles and that the interview actually contained the word paradiddle on TV!





          Originally posted by ramondo View Post
          It's been suggested we include Peggy Sue in the set list, and the guitarist (in good humour) said I might want to get practising now so it's ready for our next rehersal.

          I'm all for songs that don't include a single snare drum beat, and it got me thinking of what Jerry Allison's actually doing in that song.

          On first listening it appears to be a straight 16th note pattern with accents:


          _____1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a

          _____>_______>_______>_______>______
          tom__L R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R

          bass_|_______|_______|_______|______


          But then in a book I saw it written as a paradiddle:
          >_______>_______>_______>______
          L R L L R L R R L R L L R L R R

          (the notation here favours my left hand, but of course you could start with the right)


          The only advantage I can see with a paradiddle is that the accents alternate between the left and right hand, so dynamically it's more "even".

          And this got me thinking that the only difference between a single stroke roll and a paradiddle on a single drum is the sticking. Should they sound the same?

          I don't think they do, but this may be a trick of my mind. Or it could be I can pick up the subtle timing differences (I don't think I'm much off) between a LL and a LR.

          Or am I thinking about it too much?

          BTW, I might just set the mesh snare pad to a tom so it's easier to play - or does the TD6 have a snare with "snare off" (that's what it sounds like in the song)?
          My band http://therosefamiliar.com

          TDW-20 with two additional PD-85s and four additional CY-8s, various VEX kits, and VDrumLib

          Crappy Behringer Eurolive B215D 15" Powered PA Cabinet for monitoring
          Two JBL EON 515 15" 450-Watt Self Powered Speaker for front of house

          Behringer ULTRA-DI PRO DI800 8 channel direct box

          ESI ESU1808 audio interface with Reaper for recording

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          • #6
            Here is a video link. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lhgO8rZs1Fg
            www.myspace.com/tongueingrooveTd 20 Purple Fade V Session Cy15, 2x Cy14, Cy8, Asi+ Crown k2 amps, BBE max. Legion 15's, Madison 18 subs, Tama,Yamaha hardware.
            Your never as good or bad as you think you are !

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