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Help! I'm a creep!

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  • Help! I'm a creep!

    I'm a new drummer in training and trying to tackle a complete 'first' song to master. I have settled on one that seems simple to learn and yet won't drive me nuts playing over and over again. The song is "Creep" by Radiohead and I'm struggling with something that seem so simple it's getting very frustrating. Check out the bass drum note circled below to find my thorn of the moment.



    For the life of me I can't get this 16th note hit down with the bass and it's driving me nuts. Any tips or tricks in getting this locked in with a single pedal? Any suggestions you have in helping me get this locked down is appreciated as it's been a frustrating couple of days trying to incorporate it.
    "...regardless of what you play, the biggest thing is keeping the feel going ..." - Wes Montgomery

  • #2
    Count it 1-e-&-a etc. like it show in the tab. Then play it slow. Pay attention that the kick is right in the middle of two hi-hat strokes. Playing between hi-hat beats can throw you off, but practice and it clicks.
    sigpic

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    • #3
      Hey Mako,

      Are you playing along with the song, or just trying to do it from the sheet music alone? I'm no teacher, but I would think it should be pretty easy to pick up the beat while playing along, especially if you play it though something like audacity where you can slow it down if necessary in order to really get a feel for it.

      Try tapping it out with just your hands & foot while listening to the song, then once you feel comfortable, move to your set and try it. Keep at it and it will come to you. Just try not to think about it too much and get a 'feel' for it instead...

      Good luck, and keep us posted on how things turn out.

      Jack

      Sabre's Album

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      • #4
        These little pre-beat notes can trip you up if you THINK TOO MUCH about playing them. In addition to the previous advice, I would add this. For now, play the groove without the troubling beat. When you can play it in your sleep, apologize to your wife and try to sneak in the extra note. Think of it as a grace note, like a flam, but with one foot. Just remember it all happens in the head.

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        • #5
          Thanks for the advice guys. I gave it a break tonight and started working on learning a two beat fill tonight as I've just been playing grooves to date. I'll give your suggestions a shot and see how it goes tomorrow. I think I've probably been overthinking it and it was getting me frustrated. I may take stickinthemud's advice and try and get the song without the beat first, where I can play it on autopilot, then add it in. I'll let you know how it goes. Thanks!
          "...regardless of what you play, the biggest thing is keeping the feel going ..." - Wes Montgomery

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          • #6
            Yeah, that bass drum line seems easy, but it's much tougher than you imagine. It's basically the same as the bass drum on Dani California. There are still some days when I just can't get it down without feeling like I've got spastic-leg.


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            • #7
              Funny, it's one of the songs I also played a lot when I started a couple of months ago. For me it worked to practise two things. One: just play the song without the 16th note until you can play this with ease and two: practise the 16th note really, really slow until you got the 'feel' of the groove. And then combine and repeat and repeat. And repeat.

              I also practised a fast Dutch song this way. It has the 16th note before, but not the 8th note on the third beat. So the bass note has moved one 16th before the usual third beat. It took me a while but eventually I just felt how it should sound without counting and now I can play it without too much effort.

              BTW: what program are you using for the drum tabs?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Michael Render View Post
                Then play it slow. Pay attention that the kick is right in the middle of two hi-hat strokes.
                This is great advise. Once you can play it slow, you just need to do it until comfrtable and increase the speed.
                If you try to do it full-speed in the beginning, it just gets frustrating.

                It's just like the rudiments, start slow....and with practice, it clicks and you can blaze though it.

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                • #9
                  Playing slow is one fantastic way to learn.
                  Playing along with the song is another.

                  Sometimes it's best to combine both methods --- there are several computer applications that allow you to slow down your mp3 while maintaining the pitch height. I'm not a drummer *yet* but have plenty of guitar experience, and these apps really helped me to nail all those impossible Ten Years After guitar solos (well, I play them *really* good in 50% of their original speed )

                  Try googling for 'amazing slow downer' (I'm not affiliated with them in any way). It's a commercial product but I guess there are several free ones as well.

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                  • #10
                    You could also try dropping out the kick on the & of 3 so you can really focus on the double stroke that's causing you trouble. Sometimes I find it more difficult to play a double stroke and then follow it up with a single without my foot bunging in a lot more beats I don't want!

                    Maybe you also could work on double strokes on the bass drum and make sure you're using the bounce off the trigger to full effect. I found that by practicing triple strokes and quadruple strokes it forces you to use the bounce and make sure your foot isn't slowing down the footboards return upwards.

                    It takes a while but you will get it.

                    Good luck!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Fat Rich View Post
                      You could also try dropping out the kick on the & of 3 so you can really focus on the double stroke that's causing you trouble. Sometimes I find it more difficult to play a double stroke and then follow it up with a single without my foot bunging in a lot more beats I don't want!
                      That's what I had trouble with too: not so much the kicks on 'a' and '3', but the following kick on '&' after three. So I just slowed down and just practised the kicks on 'a' and '3'. After getting comfortable with that, I added the following kick on '&'.

                      To me learning to play a song comes down to slowing down and breaking a song into small segments. Simplify the groove and play what you already control. Then start adding the difficult notes one at a time. Then speed up and try to play along with the song. If that is still too difficult, play without the difficult notes. And then start the routine again. Some songs may be harder than others, but finally you'll get better and better.

                      And also keep practising the rudiments: for some time I didn't do it and just played along with songs. I found out, however, that because I didn't master the rudiments, it slowed me down form playing the songs right. So now I divide my playing time between rudiments and fun (playing songs I like).

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Makomachine View Post
                        Check out the bass drum note circled below to find my thorn of the moment.


                        Once you've nailed this one you could try moving the kick from the "&" of 3 forward by a sixteenth to give you a triple kick workout.

                        In other words kick on the 1, the "a" of 2, the 3, the "e" of 3

                        Takes a lot of practice but it's a killer groove when you get down (which I still haven't )

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                        • #13
                          Maybe what you can do is slide the beat (note) that is troubling you back to the & so you are still working on the 3 kicks in a row, it just won't have that syncopation feel. After you get that solid, work on shifting it back.

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                          • #14
                            try hit the bassdrum as your hand comes up from the and of 2 hit.

                            you'll then be "sandwiching" that bass drum between the and of 2 and the 3 (if that helps visualize it)

                            try practice really slow just that part, hit the bass drum as the hand comes up from the hihat hit and hit the bass drum again as the 2nd hit goes down onto the hihat.

                            I would count like this:

                            1 and 2 and AH (this where you hit bass drum) 3 (hit again) and 4

                            then I would count just the numbers while playing

                            1, 2, 3, 4

                            then count the 8ths

                            1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and

                            I was wondering what program/website you used to convert the tab to sheet music, or is that just a text file screenshot i'm looking at?

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                            • #15
                              I used Tabtrax. I'm finding it to be a great tool in working with tabs and conversions. I'm not close to even using 1/2 of it's functionality at this point, but it seems to be a solid program.

                              I'll look into tryng to slow the song down as well. That's another good suggestion and I feel having the song playing, instead of just a click, helps me get into the groove a little easier.

                              I know my foot technique is 'raw' without a doubt so I'll also try and I'll need to see if it's my foot slowing the return that is the problem. I'm barefoot right now but there's just too much going on for me to know what's going on. I think my problem is overthinking it at this point, but form isn't helping.

                              Thanks for all the tips and I'll let you know how things progress....
                              "...regardless of what you play, the biggest thing is keeping the feel going ..." - Wes Montgomery

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