Welcome! If this is your first visit, you will need to register to participate.

DO NOT use symbols in usernames. Doing so will result in an inability to sign in & post!

If you cannot sign in or post, please visit our vBulletin Talk section for answers to vBulletin related FAQs.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Should I Start Learning Paradiddles Yet?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Should I Start Learning Paradiddles Yet?

    I have had 5 lessons now. And I am progressing well, my instructor says im 4 months ahead of where i should be, but that is not all good.

    I find it harder to play slow and pic up basics, where I find it easier to play fast and do more difficult stuff.

    I want to learn at a faster rate and am getting a bit bored of the Rock School Debut book. I can do everything in it. I have started on the next book myself and can seem to pick it up easily.

    I just watched a video on You Tube regarding paradiddles, I crave good fills and new beats. Is it worth me investing time in learning how to play them properly?
    Lee "Shaggy" Shand

  • #2
    playing slower will always be tougher as a drummer cuz your job is to keep the beat, when it's slower, there's more time in between to mess up. That being said, it's still tough to play fast stuff, physically. For now i'd suggest keeping it slow, and yes start on those paradiddles as soon as you can.

    I've been drumming for years and never took the time to properly learn paradiddles so i still practice them. Learn all your rudiments, though, and the best part is you can usually practice them at night with a pad if you want, or the bottom of your shoe Even if you just do like 10 minutes a day, it's not that much time and it will give you a good solid base from which to work on.

    Practice your doubles too and just getting that perfect balance on the fulcrum of your pointer finger to make the job the much easier for the rest of your fingers when doing really fast doubles or single stroke rolls. Getting that balance where your hand is completely relaxed but in full control, is the best feeling in drumming, i think. Goodluck.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks mate. My instructor has not taught me anything about holding the sticks, or how to use my hands, should i be asking to be taught that?
      Lee "Shaggy" Shand

      Comment


      • #4
        most definitely, that's the first thing i was taught and the first thing i teach anyone who wants to learn.

        what's the point getting comfortable playing something, and then all of a sudden your teacher says, "ok now hold it like this and play it". Haha it would all of a sudden be uncomfortable again.
        Last edited by squirtis; 08-24-08, 03:59 PM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Yeah. I may find another tutor actually, just to compare notes
          Lee "Shaggy" Shand

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by ShaggyRS6 View Post
            Thanks mate. My instructor has not taught me anything about holding the sticks, or how to use my hands, should i be asking to be taught that?
            Then he is not doing his job. These are the first things you should be shown along with the basic rudiments. Has he even introduced you the all the parts of the kit, shown you how to assemble and break the kit down?

            We all start off on the basics but there are the simple basics of the basics you need to know. One of the first things he should have shown you is how to hold the sticks and explain why.



            *Free TD-12 & TD-20 Kits*....*Free SPD-s Kits & Effects*
            *Videos*......*Demos*......*Pictures*......*Documents*

            Comment


            • #7
              I completely agree with Mr Stixx here...
              find another teacher, because if you're not being taught the right stuff in the beginning, it'll be hard to pick up later.
              http://s178.photobucket.com/albums/w...t=SANY0907.jpg

              Comment


              • #8
                I'm on lesson 6 and we did para's from day 1, now more stuff like offbeat bass drum and snare in jazz, learning musicality and groove/feel of music, funk beats, now we have combinations of accents to make fills, ghost notes, it's building up nicely but i also learn stuff off youtube ... onlinedrummer seems good and many more, i also picked 10 rudiments i like and practise them to get the wrists going, my double strokes have suddenly come to life

                My tutor inspires me to be groove orientated and play from slow, he say's that if you can play painfully slow then there are no cracks when speeded up, also he emphasizes being a player that feels the music instead of just ripping off the flashy fills.

                He makes sense...find another tutor.
                WEBSITE - http://www.diamondelectronicdrums.com/
                YOUTUBE CHANNEL - http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbVB...?feature=guide
                FACEBOOK me at ... https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?f...83235555050736
                :eek: ...
                Showcase 1 - http://vdrums.com/forum/album.php?albumid=253
                Showcase 2 - http://vdrums.com/forum/album.php?albumid=354

                Comment


                • #9
                  I've been through this with the guitar, so I speak from experience - the very BASICS which you should be taught first is how to hold the sticks correctly. On the guitar I was playing from age 7 until about 16 when I was told my picking technique was totally wrong, and it was what was stopping me from progressing any further physically. I had such a hard time trying to learn it again I eventually gave up and went back to my old habits. You don't want this to be you.

                  And to side with daveybabes, I believe it's all about the groove. Even on a straight 4/4 beat. If you can't groove, you're no better than a drum machine, and even with perfect timing you'll just sound like a robot.

                  BTW - My first drum lesson (after learning how to sit, and how to hold the sticks) was 3 hours of basic 4/4 beat without a break, no cymbal crashes, toms, or snare ghosts/accents allowed. 8's on the hat, 1 and 3 on the bass, 2 and 4 on the snare. It was as boring as hell but completely worth it. And, I couldn't wait for my next one
                  2Box Drumit5, DIY 12" Snare, 12" Floor Tom, 2x10" Toms. Acoustic cymbals w/DIY triggers, Triggera Krigg, Tama Iron Cobra Kick and Tama Roadpro HH stand. Tennis Ball Riser (not needed now I have the Krigg lol).

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by TheCoda View Post
                    BTW - My first drum lesson (after learning how to sit, and how to hold the sticks) was 3 hours of basic 4/4 beat without a break, no cymbal crashes, toms, or snare ghosts/accents allowed. 8's on the hat, 1 and 3 on the bass, 2 and 4 on the snare. It was as boring as hell but completely worth it. And, I couldn't wait for my next one
                    engraving your muscle memory. if people have patients they will learn the drums pretty quick this way. and it only gets exponentially faster, as the first and basic muscles are the hardest to get used to the feel.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      When I started out, my first teacher would break the lesson up into drumset, and rudiments. For me this was:

                      1) Drumset - at the time was a Carmine Appice book (I forget the name) which was very straight forward, and got me to understand the basics as well as read music.

                      2) Rudiments - Playing through "Stick Control", basic double stroke exercises, and playing to a metronome, going from quarter notes all the way to triplet sixteenths.

                      I'd be weary of any instructor that said you were "4 months ahead" of where you should be. People learn at their own pace and have their own goals. It's the teacher's job to help them reach those goals.

                      Adam

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by ShaggyRS6 View Post
                        Thanks mate. My instructor has not taught me anything about holding the sticks, or how to use my hands, should i be asking to be taught that?
                        Get Jojo Mayer's Secret Weapons for Drummers DVD.. that contains pretty much everything you'll ever want to know about how to hold your sticks; production values are also great.

                        I understand why your instructor doesn't want to do your head in with "how to hold your sticks" and "rudiments".. you'd be bored to death before you ever get to play on a full kit.

                        On the other hand, it's much easier to get the fundamentals right at the start than to try to change your technique later. Besides, bad technique + lots of practice -> tendonitis, rotator cuff injury, etc. -> fast track to retirement

                        I'm new to the drums as well, but I can look back at all the mistakes I made when learning the guitar.. never spending enough time on the fundamentals, moving on too fast without ever really mastering anything, trying stuff that's too hard too early, not really enjoying the practice, etc.

                        This time over I'm moving along gently trying to get the basic technique down and programming my muscle memory so that it can continue playing the basic 4/2 groove while I'm doing long divisions in my head

                        A good indication of whether you master something or not is to see what happens when your attention wanders. If you start messing up everything, it means it's your head playing not your body. That can be good enough, but it could definitely be better still..

                        Also when you play are you all tensed up or do you just let it flow?

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X