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Rock drummers 'are top athletes' - BBC News

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  • Rock drummers 'are top athletes' - BBC News

    I knew it was good for me

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/7518888.stm
    TD9KX w/KD-120 kick, VH-11 HH, PD-125 snare, CY-8 crash, Gibralter double pedal :cool:

  • #2
    Can i then deduct the costs from taxes as a health premium?
    TD9+6v with Diamond Electronic pads, and cowbell.
    ATH-50m headphones, VEX packs
    not to mention keyboards, guitars, basses, and cats

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    • #3
      I have totally replaced any cardio training I was doing to supplement my weight training with drumming. It is SO much more enjoyable and just as effective

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      • #4
        I hate to put the damper on such glee, but check this out:

        http://scienceblogs.com/bushwells/20...p_athletes.php

        The intersection of drumming and athletic performance is a place where I live.

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        • #5
          Yeah, I was suspicious as well - I've managed to become quite rotund over the past few years, and I play at least 2 hours a day. And I'm vegan - go figure. However, my wife brags about my calves and forearms being "made of steel", so obviously drumming provides somewhat of an atheletic workout.

          Cheers.

          Steve
          No more V-drums; all acoustics now.

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          • #6
            So who's the fittest drummer then? My vote is for Caroline Corr!!!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by StuR View Post
              So who's the fittest drummer then? My vote is for Caroline Corr!!!
              *SuperPuss puts a paw in the air*

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              • #8
                Originally posted by JimFiore View Post
                I hate to put the damper on such glee, but check this out:

                http://scienceblogs.com/bushwells/20...p_athletes.php

                The intersection of drumming and athletic performance is a place where I live.
                This article and the first article are probably extremes of a point of view. I would say drumming, particularly energetic rock drumming, lies somewhere between the two extremes presented in these articles.
                I understood the 140 - 150 bpm quoted in the first article as an average heart rate while playing and not a resting heart rate as stated in the second article. 140 - 150 bpm as a resting heart rate would indicate a dangerously unfit person!

                My drumming, while certainly not anywhere near as intense as a set of heavy free weight squats or 10 minutes on an elliptical with my heart rate at a constant 180 bpm, is certainly more of an effort than an average bike ride or a brisk walk and I am also a world class athlete.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Relayer View Post
                  Yeah, I was suspicious as well - I've managed to become quite rotund over the past few years, and I play at least 2 hours a day. And I'm vegan - go figure. However, my wife brags about my calves and forearms being "made of steel", so obviously drumming provides somewhat of an atheletic workout.
                  e
                  Eating too many carbohydrates? i noticed when I became a vegetarian, I started to eat much more starch as well...had to radically change in order to get back into my trousers...
                  TD9+6v with Diamond Electronic pads, and cowbell.
                  ATH-50m headphones, VEX packs
                  not to mention keyboards, guitars, basses, and cats

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Nah, I been veg for over 20 years - only started getting fat the past few. My problem is I spend 18 hrs a day in my studio. Just need to get out and about more.

                    Cheers.

                    Steve
                    No more V-drums; all acoustics now.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Relayer View Post
                      However, my wife brags about my calves and forearms being "made of steel",
                      I am in the same boat. My legs and forearms are trim and fit. The rest of me... well, lets just say not so much.

                      I do find that vigorous drumming does lower my blood sugar. About the same as a workout at the treadmill, so you know what I choose!
                      sigpic

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by SuperPuss View Post
                        I understood the 140 - 150 bpm quoted in the first article as an average heart rate while playing and not a resting heart rate as stated in the second article. 140 - 150 bpm as a resting heart rate would indicate a dangerously unfit person!
                        Reread the second. 140-150 was not stated to be a resting HR. It was stated that it wouldn't even be the average for a person who was running easy (assuming they had a normal HRmax). That has been my experience.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by JimFiore View Post
                          Reread the second. 140-150 was not stated to be a resting HR. It was stated that it wouldn't even be the average for a person who was running easy (assuming they had a normal HRmax). That has been my experience.
                          The part of the article I am referring to states this....
                          Consider their numbers. Mr. Burke was tested as having a heart rate of 140 to 150 beats per minute with a peak of 190. That's considerably higher than the resting HR of 70 for a typical male
                          This could mean one of two things....

                          1. They measured Mr. Burke's resting heart rate at 140 - 150 bpm (based on them stating that 140 - 150 is considerably higher than the average male's resting rate of 70 bpm) and his peak exertion as 190 bpm during exercise,

                          or...

                          2. They are stating that his average exercising heart rate is 140 - 150 bpm with peak exertion at 190 bpm in which case 140 - 150 bpm is obviously higher than the average males resting heart rate of 70 bpm... he is exercising... Duh!!

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                          • #14
                            Allow me to add a few more points....

                            * Obviously a statement like 'Rock drummers are top athletes' is a pretty broad generalisation. Obviously not all rock drummers are top athletes! It doesn't take too much IQ to figure that one out.

                            * The BBC report didn't quote any VO2 Max figures which would give considerable meaning to their tests. They did appear to be measuring it though judging by the oxygen mask.

                            * The BBC report also didn't mention anything about the rate of return to resting heart rate from peak exertion which is also a significant factor in measuring fitness levels. Nor do they mention the resting heart rate figures for their subject.

                            * They also mention nothing of their subjects' basal metabolic rate.

                            I can only assume (perhaps incorrectly) that they did factor in at least some of these other measurements to give their tests meaning but left it out of the report because the general public won't have a clue what they mean!


                            ...and a heart rate of 140 - 150 bpm for a sustained period is hardly a leisurely jog. Most top athletes with very high VO2 Max readings have a peak heart rate around 180 - 190 bpm and 150 bpm is a fair percentage of that. Anyone, including a trained athlete who maintains a 150 bpm heart rate is going to work up a significant sweat and burn a considerable amount of calories.

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                            • #15
                              Sorry to hijack your thread Shorty but one last thing I feel compelled to mention and Jim will no doubt agree with me on this.

                              A very fit person is going to require a greater physical exertion to raise their heart rate to 150 bpm than an unfit person. Measuring heart rate alone during exercise is meaningless.

                              I can sit at my kit and play at a moderate tempo and play with a moderate pressure and hardly even raise my heart rate at all. However, get the double kick pedal going, add some 16th notes and a fast tempo and I can work up a sweat quite fast...... and that is enjoyable cardio

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