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Off Topic, Anyone out here a Systems Analyst?

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  • Off Topic, Anyone out here a Systems Analyst?

    I have an opportunity to be one. I'm looking to get out of my current business and move into something in this industry. Is there anyone who can give me any info, good and bad about doing this job. Thanks.

  • #2
    I will step in and answer this, since I'm (closely) in this field (as a computer technician/Help Desk lacky).

    The best thing that you could do for yourself is to weigh as many of the pros and cons of doing this kind of work vs. your current job (musician?). You will very likely be sitting in a cube farm for most of the day, staring at a (hopefully refresh optimized) 17" or preferably larger computer display, whacking away at a keyboard and a mouse. You might also be fortunate enough to take home much more income than you could at being a musician while at the same time not having to subject your equipment and your ears to harsh environments, loud noise, crazy/drunk people, and your other band mates.

    With all that said, if I had an opportunity to be in a band and pull in a steady decent income, I'd jump at it.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by FloridaDrummer:
      I have an opportunity to be one. I'm looking to get out of my current business and move into something in this industry. Is there anyone who can give me any info, good and bad about doing this job. Thanks.
      http://itprojmngt.8m.net/projman/org...d_analyst.html

      Everything you need to know is there.

      Bottom line: If you are a technically proficient "people person", and have some development experience behind you and have good logic skills, then Systems Analysis might be right for you.

      If you like computers because you get to do cool, geeky stuff, then become a programmer.

      - Hans

      Real world job: Project Director, I manage teams of systems analysts...
      - Hans

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      • #4
        Originally posted by RayPat01:
        You will very likely be sitting in a cube farm for most of the day
        I call mine THE THREE-SIDED LIFE-SUCKING POD OF DEATH!

        Real job: Associate Editor for Videomaker Magazine www.videomaker.com

        Boom Theory Spacemuffins
        TD6
        HDI Cymbals

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        • #5
          I am MCSE(2K) & CCNA & A+ certified. And what is my job.... Sales go figure. Tech indy. died and so did a lot of jobs. Had to work and make money, and not many things pay like sales. Oh well.
          :rolleyes:

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Jgel:
            I am MCSE(2K) & CCNA & A+ certified. And what is my job.... Sales go figure. Tech indy. died and so did a lot of jobs. Had to work and make money, and not many things pay like sales. Oh well.
            Thanks for the posts, I'm in the fifth largest IT market so the jobs are still around, I'm still not sure if I should get into the market. When you worked in tht market, what were your daily activities?

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            • #7
              Being in one of the largest tech cities, I can tell you that the market is wayyyyyy saturated right now. Plenty of experienced administrators & SA's either pounding the pavement or working out of their field. If you already have a job lined up, go for it. If not, do all the research you can.

              I weathered the tech bust no problem, but some friends of mine didn't. Plan carefully, but do what you really want to.

              Just my opinion,

              -Danny
              Regional IT Technical Director
              -Danny

              Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life.

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              • #8
                Thanks Danny,
                I really want to get into the field. I'm going to start my MCSE and CCNA in a few weeks. I declined the other offer (money was bad) but that's the field I want to get into. Any advice?

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                • #9
                  Advice: Get whatever experience you can, paying or non-paying, while working on your certs. What we call "paper MCSE's" are a dime a dozen; folks who get their cert thinking that it is an automatic big-money job ticket, but have absolutely no experience in the field. Most of them never get the chance to use it, as nobody will hire them, especially in the current economic climate.

                  I'd volunteer at the local college, run an ad looking for an internship, whatever. Work experience in the field will make you stand out from the crowd.

                  The more networking technologies you have knowledge of, the better. Bone up on Cisco configuration stuff, know your TCP/IP, and be familiar with network security as relates to internet connectivity. Those are things that will get you in the door. The guys with the broad skill sets are valuable. Make yourself one.

                  Don't forget to learn command line, too, when you're working on server stuff. It can bail out a good admin and baffle a mediocre one.

                  For realistic salary expectations, go to www.salary.com, enter in the job description (be honest, and use entry-level), and it can tell you what some folks in your area are making. With no experience & fresh into the field, expect to start on the low end of the curve. Not trying to bring you down, but the days of geeks being hired right outta college, untested, for major money are long gone. Many of those same geeks are out of work now, and going back to school.

                  Good luck,

                  -Danny
                  -Danny

                  Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks again Danny,

                    I wouldn't consider myself a paper MCSE but I think the title is sure fitting for some people I know. I have been setting up networks for years now and I'm getting the certs for pure marketable factors, like the catch 22, no cert no job, need cert for job, even though I could handle most of the things that come my way. Little slow on sercurity, but the class should help me on that. What are you referring to as command line? Also, I can take 2 electives, any ideas which ones they should be?

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