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  • 2 questions . . .

    Hello all,
    I have 2 question I would appreciate
    some input on:

    1. I've only been playing drums (V-Clubs) for about 3 months. I seem to get a little soreness in my elbow after playing. It
    doesn't actually hurt when I'm playing, or
    is even painful. I only notice the pain when I apply pressure to the elbow, like putting my elbow down on a table top. Is this a
    known drumming injury problem? I'm also 41, is this an age related problem, lol.

    2. When playing the kick drum, do most people play with the foot completely down on the pedal, or keep the heel up and play with the toes, or ball of the foot (which I do)?

    Thanks for your help.


  • #2
    Hey Mike PORCARO, you wouldn't happen to be related to...?
    Sounds like tendonitis to me. I've had it before. Doctor will tell you to rest it and may give anti-inflammatory medication. After three months, I ended up going to an acupuncturist. I thought it was going to be a bunch of voodoo but it cured it in just two visits...and I didn't get a dead chicken waved over me!

    [This message has been edited by Toekneedrum (edited January 28, 2002).]
    Boom Theory Spacemuffins
    TD6
    HDI Cymbals

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Toekneedrum:
      Hey Mike PORCARO, you wouldn't happen to be related to....
      Good question....

      Only been playing drums a short time? Does that mean that you have been playing bass for the last 30+ years? (25 of which in the best band to ever grace this planet!)

      Something about a dog....wizard of OZ...can't really remember...

      If you are not THE Mike Pocaro, there must be a story about your name - please tell.

      If you are THE Mike Pocaro, you have just made my life!

      As far as playing foot up or down, you should be able to do both competently. Your brother was a heel up player.
      Steve

      'I only ever quote myself - except when I quote someone else' - me

      , plenty of , and , , triggered acoustics, , and a plethora of PA blah blah freakin blah...I mean does anyone care about the specifics of pedals, speakers, processors, hardware or anything that I'm using?? :confused: Hmmm, maybe this is an appropriate place to mention that I tried out a new cymbal stand the other day...

      Comment


      • #4
        RSI. No doubt (says your online doctor)

        Does this only occur with rubber drum pads? Not with mesh headed pads? Should be a reason to change to mesh heads.
        Robert

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by MikePorcaro:

          1. I've only been playing drums (V-Clubs) for about 3 months. I seem to get a little soreness in my elbow after playing. It
          doesn't actually hurt when I'm playing, or
          is even painful. I only notice the pain when I apply pressure to the elbow, like putting my elbow down on a table top. Is this a
          known drumming injury problem? I'm also 41, is this an age related problem, lol.
          When I was playing just rubber pads I had a problem with my wrists. At the time I was using 7A sticks and looking at them I found that they were not wearing in the original way, however the spring in the drumstick was not there. I thought that this was probably transferring the shock up the sick into my wrist.

          I changed to 5A and made sure the sticks were always in good shape (suppleness in wood)

          I also had a couple of lessons giving the instructor the mandate to challenge my technique to help solve any problems.

          I recommend the latter get someone to look at your technique, solving this now can save loads of problems latter on.


          Comment


          • #6
            A couple of things, if the pain is coming from the actual elbow, meaning the joint and not the muscles surrounding it then it very well could be a technique issue. If it is the muscle group on the back side of the arm, then you could be holding the sticks too tight. Try different sticks or a looser grip.

            Second, have you been playing drums for only three months or only the v-clubs? If your an experienced drummer than try changing the angle and the distance of the pads, going from acustic to the clubs will alter your technique.

            Comment


            • #7
              quote:
              --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Originally posted by : Steveo the DEvo
              Only been playing drums a short time? Does that mean that you have been playing bass for the last 30+ years? (25 of which in the best band to ever grace this planet!)
              --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Oh Baby! Does it get any better than Jeff's "Rosanna" funk-shuffle?
              Boom Theory Spacemuffins
              TD6
              HDI Cymbals

              Comment


              • #8
                thanks for the replies . . .

                I've only been playing BASS for the last 15+ years, and not for Toto. Jeff is my favorite drummer . . . and my real last name has the same first letter and last 3 letters as his. Jeff Berlin, Chris Squire, and John Deacon are my favorite bass players.
                I think the elbow problem is with technique, and tensing up my arm when playing. I would like to get some lessons but can't find anyone here in Nassau County, LI, NY.
                The only song I've been trying to learn how to play is Toto's Rosanna, and on a good day can almost play it for at least 1 minute.
                I noticed Jeff Porcaro rests his left arm on his leg when he plays, I wonder why he does that. I would like to eventually buy a mesh head set, but the V-Clubs seem to be good as a starting set because of the price and size.


                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by MikePorcaro:
                  I noticed Jeff Porcaro rests his left arm on his leg when he plays, I wonder why he does that.
                  wow, that's really surprising, especially since i think he played with matched grip. he must have sat pretty high relative to his snare to get a good sound out of it. i think most people would consider that pretty poor technique. then again, vinnie sometimes hangs his left arm down straight at his side when he's not playing the snare. i guess the masters get can break all the rules they want.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Mike, if you are playing on rubber pads, they are most likely the culprit. Rubber-pad kits are infamous for causing repetitive-motion stress injuries; since there is no "give" to the playing surface, the shock of impact is transferred up the stick to your hand, wrist, and arm. The tighter you grip your stick, the worse it gets.

                    Couple of suggestions: work on proper grip, for one. If you're using matched-grip, use your thumb and forefinger to create a fulcrum, and don't grip overtight with your other fingers.

                    Using a vibration-isolating stick wrap could be helpful, too. I use Easton AHEAD sticks, which are pretty vibration-friendly, and use tennis racquet grip-wrap which makes a nice, cushy grip. It also prevents the dreaded stick-slinging that has angered many bass players I've worked with in past years!

                    To address your comment about Jeff Porcaro resting his left arm on his leg - It has been a long time since I saw his video, so I can't really recall what his arm position was... Personally, I sit VERY high compared to my drums, and my left hand/wrist touches my left leg when I hit my snare on the typical rimshot-backbeat hit. Never having had a drumset lesson (all my instruction was in marching & classical percussion), I'm sure that my technique is horrendous & would make Freddy Gruber turn over in his (future) grave.

                    Advantages: Frame of reference for striking the snare consistently at the same spot/stick angle. When you are tired as hell, on your 4th set of the night, you can get lazy & do the work with just your wrist.

                    Disadvantages: Someone will tell you that you're doing it all wrong, but that'll happen no matter what you do. Also, after particularly spirited playing on heavy music, I'll sometimes have a bruise on my left thigh! It makes a nice compliment to the little blood splatters from nicking my knuckles on tom rims...

                    Of course, if you want to avoid this technique, just be a cool jazz guy and play with traditional grip. You can easily tilt your snare away from you & place it really high, so that you can sorta hook your wrist over the rim of the snare drum to rest it while looking bored and relaxed while playing that 11/16 passage with wandering tempo... Caution: This technique works best with very old & small acoustic drums, and you must be wearing a suit.

                    -Danny
                    -Danny

                    Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life.

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