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Future Rock

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  • Future Rock

    Ok, hear is a topic that could be discussed or well letís be honest argued.

    What do you think the future of rock music is? Or who do you think is really breaking new ground in the rock world?

    My vision (albeit slightly biased) of future rock is kind of a rock/techno hybrid group, adding sequencers and samplers, or incorporating DJís into the music.

    I feel that bands like Linkin Park are really heading up the hard rock scene. Only because I hear them using some sequenced beats, adding a little rapping and things like that. But Iím not the biggest fan of their music; Iíve only heard the songs on the radio.

    Radio Head IMHO is really breaking some ground in rock using a lot of sampled guitar and things of the like.

    Also I think that V, or E drummers are defiantly a big part of the picture, partially due to my opinion that the future lies with rock/techno hybrid acts, because in techno one of the biggest pieces of the music is the beat and percussion. A kick, snare and high hat donít really cut it as far as beats are concerned with techno music. Perhaps rock is going the same way.

    Whatís your opinion?
    http://www.evolbeats.com

  • #2
    Just recently I have been getting some great sounds from old pots & pans by using wooden spoons.

    I think I may try a washboard and some spoons next.

    I think you are on the right track, however donít forget the inventiveness of e-drummers
    I think Johner's post on thr bodhran makes this particular point
    http://www.vdrums.com/discussion/For...ML/000263.html

    Comment


    • #3
      The future of Rock?

      It has none.

      It's future is in the past. Everything done after the 1st rockers is basically a recycle job. I mean, it's, uh, like, hmmmm, how do you go beyond 'Johnny B. Goode'?

      Once a thing is created, that's it! Game over! No more quarters!

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      • #4
        Tool.

        I donít think they are ďtechnoishĒ but they are damn good.


        ------------------
        Outboard gear: Focusrite Compounder, Drawmer MX-30, BBE-482, Aphex C-104, Behringer T1951 4-Band Parametric Tube EQ, Lexicon MPX1, Mackie 1402-VLZ, (Crown K2 amp & Cerwin Vega V-253 speakers = 1600 watts @ 4 ohms continues power, peak at 3000 watts) and Sony MDR-V700DJ headphones.
        Studio

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        • #5
          aaaoooorrrggg YAWN
          So sleepy, tired of Marc.'s comments - off to bed!
          Steve

          'I only ever quote myself - except when I quote someone else' - me

          , plenty of , and , , triggered acoustics, , and a plethora of PA blah blah freakin blah...I mean does anyone care about the specifics of pedals, speakers, processors, hardware or anything that I'm using?? :confused: Hmmm, maybe this is an appropriate place to mention that I tried out a new cymbal stand the other day...

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          • #6
            Tool.

            Yea.

            Nuff said.

            Comment


            • #7
              I was just thinking about this the other day. I play in a band that plays across the whole history of Rock. They play Everly Brothers, The Hollies, Gerry and the Pacemakers, Jonny Cash, Beatles, Lynyrd Skynyrd, The Rolling Stones (old and new), CCR, Creed, Tool, and others. What I have found by playing all these eras is that the drums have come a long way. In the fifty's, most of the music had either no bass drum or no high hat play. Alot of it is single, double beats on a snare to keep time. If there were high hats, they were very low volume, almost not heard. Cymbals were almost non existant.

              Then later on, you start hearing more straight groove with snare and bass with 8th note high hats and some cymbals. No real fills, maybe an extra snare or tom.

              Then more drumming play became the norm, a lot more fills and different styles of drumming. Cymbals are used more than ever.

              Presently, the drums are a major part of the music. Complicated rhythms and fills. All the electronics involved. Major patterns on high hat and cymbals. Great stuff.

              If history continues, then the drums will continue to become more prominent. Rhythms will get more complicated and intergrated into the music.

              I never really looked at the older stlyes until I started with this band. If you go back to the old sockhop days and earlier, the drums are almost not there. The gutair really moved the music. The first song that we play that really adds serious drums is the Beatles tunes. There might be some earlier ones, but we don't play them. Enough said in one post.

              BTW, I was just reading about how Ringo Star used to tape a partially empty pack of cigarettes to his snare to increase the depth of the sound.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by FloridaDrummer:
                I was just thinking ...
                Some very good observations. True, drumming was pretty basic in rock's early days compared to today. Drumming in and of itself was not. Complex drumming pre-dates rock by a long shot. Give Chick Webb a listen & check out his kit.

                Oh oh! I think Steveo is baiting me into another Carl Palmer soliloquy! -

                -------------------------------------
                Seriously, what's left after "Good Golly Miss Molly" ???? -

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                • #9
                  Musical trends are difficult to predict, but I think it's pretty clear that music distribution is set for a huge change. As technology matures, professional musicians will begin to bypass the recording and distribution industries (RIAA) and focus on completely different models of revenue, particularly live performance, commercial events, and endorsements. Most popular music recordings will not be "sold" as we understand today, but freely traded among fans. And why not? This is a powerful form of promotion for the artist, who then reaps the benefits through endorsements and live performance. Copyright will likely remain with us, but will become an asset for the artist rather than the producer. Free trading of music recordings will not be outlawed, but encouraged. The music "industry" will return to a system based on free market economics, rather than a tangled web of government regulation and corporate lobbying. Market share (popularity) will be earned rathar than bought.

                  I believe these upcoming changes in distribution will result in more (and better) music in general -- "more" meaning more variety in artists (because it will be much easier for new artists to get into the business), "better" meaning less corporate products like Britney Spears and more real talent.

                  So what I'm trying to say is that music (including rock) will only get better and better, because the pool of talented pro musicians with the ability to make a living on music is going to increase substantially. Popular music won't be dictated to us by MTV and the RIAA but the listeners themselves -- and that is something worth waiting for IMO. I'll give it 15 years before the RIAA runs out of funding completely.

                  Well that's my 2 cents, anyway.
                  Roland TD-20 v1.08, various v-drums and v-cymbals, Yamaha KP65's, Axis pedals, Gibraltar hardware, Mackie 1202/SRM450 (pre-china)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I agree we are in for some changes. But your statement below puzzles me...

                    "Most popular music recordings will not be "sold" as we understand today, but freely traded among fans. And why not? This is a powerful form of promotion for the artist, who then reaps the benefits through endorsements and live performance"

                    The part about trading music and benefiting via live perf and endorsement makes me ask, does anyone have statistics on how much an artist makes on live performances vs CD/recording sales? I'm talking about bands with a few hits, who make the top 10 and might see an occasional week or two at no. 1. I have my doubts about just how many endorsements they get.

                    I'm not at the point where I disagree with this, I would just like to understand why I should expect this to happen.

                    Of course, with CD burners, waves, mp3's, it might happen because we can't stop. That doesn't mean there won't be any repercussions.

                    Kit Pic 1 Kit Pic 2 Kit Pic 3... And FOR SALE I have: 3 PD-9's, MDS-10 purple rack w/cables/pad and cym mounts. See classified posts for details or PM me.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Boingo:
                      ... Of course, with CD burners, waves, mp3's, it might happen because we can't stop. That doesn't mean there won't be any repercussions.
                      Interesting. Oh, it may be a good thing for a single individual willing to take on all of the logistics involved with earning a nice living, but is it realistic? What if this person is drafted by the masses into superstardom? And one-hit wonders? They would need to tour forever? A hit song is just the tip of an iceberg. There is an entire empire "behind the scenes". Also, this empire employs people.

                      No, technology (and the power of the almighty & most xlnt '$') will probably allow the system/s in place now to continue and even evolve. Long live capitalism and Mom's apple pie!

                      Jonathan E? We await you!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Marc.:

                        It's future is in the past. Everything done after the 1st rockers is basically a recycle job
                        This is probably true,but not only for rock!...
                        All kinds of music (especially techno) have been recycling themselves for a long time now.
                        The future has to be 'Hybrid' just like prototype said... everything is going to get together.Genres will disappear(actually they won't ,but again they'll just get recycled).
                        Radiohead are one step ahead of the others,but are they really a 'rock' band ?
                        We should try to make music that cannot be put into any category. Music is not a supermarket product.
                        P.

                        Nabil

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                        • #13
                          I agree with everything said. I also didn't say that drumming in general was more complicated now but was referring only to the Rock genre.

                          As for the business end, MP3 are here to stay in one form or another. No matter how much it sucks to the artist, it can't be stopped. But, on the other hand, I'm able to listen to stuff that I would not be able to because of the RIAA distrubution like ufotofu said.

                          I have owned several business's over the years and have studied the music business a little, If I'm wrong with the next statement, please correct me. From what I understand, if you go the traditional route of making and distrubuting your first album via a record company, you don't make hardly any money on it anyway, no matter how popular it gets. The record company gets most of it and you make yours on touring, etc. Thus the one hit wonders walk away with very little of the pot. The problem is that if you don't use the record companies, you have a major distrubution problem and your album won't get the marketing it needs to make it a hit. It's a catch 22.

                          The distrubution of music is going to be the biggest change in the next 10 - 15 years. Napster created a whole entire industry. More MP3 players, CD burners, etc have been sold as a direct result of music swapping than any other reason. No one will be able to stop it and no one will be successful in charging a fee to get the music. There are too many "underground" internet sites to stop them. That means that the record companies will loose a huge amount of power and control. They should not be fighting it and should be looking for a way to use it as a cheaper tool of distrubuting commercial music.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Boingo:
                            I would just like to understand why I should expect this to happen.
                            IMO, the #1 reason why big-time rock stars are able to make so much money today is because they have relatively little competition. It is very difficult for new artists to enter the big-time market (aka MTV), and this is not by chance -- the RIAA has spent millions on lobbying government to create new laws that hamper the competition. They have a virtual monopoly (granted by government) on mass production and distribution of music.

                            Soon, technology will become cheap enough and mature enough to allow the little guy to compete with the big wigs, in both production and distribution of music. But why do I think the concept of "owning" music (the buying and selling of a physical product) will fade away? Because eventually, there will be so many "little guys" saturating the market that the *big* guys won't be able to compete! A bit of a stretch in today's world, I know, but then again I'm not exactly a conventional thinker.

                            I'll add that the only possible way for the big wigs (RIAA types) to hold on to their market share is through litigation. Due to technological advancement, their business model is not going to last forever (and they know this better than anyone). This is in fact the very reason the RIAA was formed -- to lobby government for new laws that work to preserve their market share.

                            Note that I don't "blame" the RIAA for any of this, nor am I some kind of "anti-RIAA" activist. Only the force of government can sustain a monopoly.
                            Roland TD-20 v1.08, various v-drums and v-cymbals, Yamaha KP65's, Axis pedals, Gibraltar hardware, Mackie 1202/SRM450 (pre-china)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Marc.:
                              Long live capitalism
                              Technically, capitalism is the absence of government regulation (aside from the enforcement of voluntary, private contract). What we have today is sort of a pseudo-capitalism, where market share is partly dictated by litigation, instead of market forces alone. Not that I'm trying to nitpick or anything.


                              [This message has been edited by ufotofu (edited January 15, 2002).]
                              Roland TD-20 v1.08, various v-drums and v-cymbals, Yamaha KP65's, Axis pedals, Gibraltar hardware, Mackie 1202/SRM450 (pre-china)

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