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Exercises...

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  • Exercises...

    Hi,

    I know we discussed rudiments in the past, but at that time I didn't quite know what they were...

    A couple of months ago I started taking drum lessons from a Belgian drummer who is absolutely amazing! He really knows how to inspire and motivate me to do exercises that I would normally find extremely boring. His motto is: 'don't play stuff you already know, but try to play the things you can not play yet'. And it works... I feel like a born-again drummer. (Can you hear me preaching?)

    I want to share some exercises with you that have really helped me.


    [list=1][*] The basics... just as a reference[*] Double strokes, but with a triplet feel! It took my brain a while to make the right connections. You play a pattern of four notes, but you feel a pattern of three. The great thing is that it has also really helped me with the 'normal' double strokes.[*] The paradiddle-diddle. [*] A shifted paradiddle-diddle pattern. This is great for jazz, left hand of the snare, right hand on the ride. The right hand does the typical jazz ride, and the left hand fills in all the blanks.[*] Paradiddle with a triplet feel. I am still working on that one... it's kinda difficult.[/list=a]

    These are all exercises that are fun to do on snare & ride, but make sure that you practise them first on snare only. That way you can hear better if you make any mistakes or unwanted accents.

    Rob

    [This message has been edited by Pleiadian (edited November 20, 2001).]

  • #2
    For those of you who might be inclined to poo poo this:

    1. do it with a metronome set just above your comfort tempo.

    2. place accents on different notes and play it without losing the triplet feel.

    Exercises like this are undervalued. A few had asked for something else along these lines...good post.

    Comment


    • #3
      Ahh...now that's some preaching even I could like! ... Stoovey, my apologies.

      I am going out to replace my copy of Stick Control. The first section covers virtually every single paradiddle permutation,

      Many of them, like Pleiadian's example, make very interesting, and in some cases, authentic (Latin) grooves. Lots of them work in regular time, some really cook when played in triplet time against the standard beat on the kick.

      A classic example is playing a double paradiddle between snare and ride with the typical shuffle beat going on the kick:

      R-L-R-L-R-R-L-R-L-R-L-L
      K---------K-K----(K)

      And the good Doctor is once again, so correct..the key to sounding good, and making these grooves work (I sound like an authority - HA! - my understanding is conceptual only) is accents, accents, accents. Doing a straight 16th-note roll around the toms for a fill is boring, but doing it with triplet-feel accents is a beautiful thing.



      [This message has been edited by gingerbaker (edited November 20, 2001).]
      Immensely powerful yet with a liquid cat-quick elegance

      Comment


      • #4
        Code:
        R-L-R-L-R-R-L-R-L-R-L-L
        K---------K-K----(K)
        Interesting... I am very new to all this paradiddle stuff, so I hadn't thought of the one that does RLRLRR LRLRLL. Thanks!

        Oh... if you place examples between the CODE tags, you'll get a fixed width font. It may be my settings, but it was difficult to read your example.

        [This message has been edited by Pleiadian (edited November 20, 2001).]

        Comment


        • #5
          A good polyrhythmic exercise would be play this with your hands and play another simple pattern with your feet. Start with just the kick on the first beat of those groups of 3.
          Later you can do a pattern with your feet like
          x-x | x-x | x-x (where | seperates the groups of 3: seperate the 12 8th notes in groups of 3 8th notes)
          First play the pattern with your feet until you're comfortable with it and then play those paradiddles over it. While you play the paradiddles, you shouldn't have to think about what your feet play. That should go automaticly.
          Of course you can do it the other way around as well. Learn these paradiddles with your hands by heart and put the paradiddles 'on automatic' and go improvise over it with your feet.
          Naturally begin SLOW and when that's beginning to get comfortable, go faster, just like with everything.

          That are just some ideas I have. There are a lot more things you can do, by example play a pattern in 5/8 over it with your feet, etc etc etc.
          I think it's best to make your own exercises.

          Comment


          • #6
            Pleiadian,

            Thanks for the tip! I could not figure out how to get the top and bottom to line up. It came out wrong - the kick goes with the R-R, not after it.
            Immensely powerful yet with a liquid cat-quick elegance

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Pleiadian:
              Code:
              R-L-R-L-R-R-L-R-L-R-L-L
              K---------K-K----(K)
              Interesting... I am very new to all this paradiddle stuff, so I hadn't thought of the one that does RLRLRR LRLRLL. Thanks!
              That's a 'Double Paradiddle'.

              ------------------
              Thanx!
              -Alex & V's: http://photos.yahoo.com/flexapr
              Thanx. Alex & me V's! http://photos.yahoo.com/flexapr

              Comment


              • #8
                A really awesome website is:
                www.drumbum.com

                it has links to all kinds of lessons...

                pretty much anything you can think of...

                (check out Rick Gratton's stuff ... if you want to get freaked out!!)

                Comment

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