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anyone have any good polyrhythm excercises?

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  • anyone have any good polyrhythm excercises?

    I have just worked out 2 against 3 against 4. gets kinda of hairy. eighths on kick, quarters on right hand and triplets on left hand. Just wondering if you guys had worked on anything like this. It's a great brain excercise.

  • #2
    Jeez that's hard! I just tried it, and I'm fine until I try doing the triplets! My kick foot immediately switched from 8ths to copying my lefthand triplets I called my wife in to do the quarters for me, and I still wound up doing hand and foot triplets...I suck

    ------------------
    www.mp3.com/entrylevel
    Dan's Music Site; melodic, ethereal rock and more! Please have a listen :^)

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    • #3
      Sounds like you need a Terry Bozzio video in the worst way, man! Check him out - the king of polyrhythms.

      -Danny
      Polly want a rhythm?
      -Danny

      Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life.

      Comment


      • #4
        Hi,

        I would check out:
        www.mikemangini.com and the look for his RhythmKnowledge books. I don't have them, but from what I've seen in the examples, it looks very promising. (the guy is really insanely good, prove: http://www.mikemangini.com/MMmm/Pages/videos.html)

        Gary Chester's New Breed 1 and 2. I bought those when I read that the only practice Danny Carey (Tool's drummer) did, were exercises from Gary Chester's book.

        And of course, maybe most important, make your own exercises

        Tom

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        • #5
          Dan and Animal,

          Great posts! Dan - I thought I was going to wake up the whole house when I read your post. Funny!

          And you brought me back to how I felt when I was starting out - full of enthusiasm and frustration. A beautiful thing.

          The key is never to lose those feelings. ( Or is it to bang the two rocks together? - Can never keep it straight).

          And, hey, you don't suck - - its supposed to be difficult. Otherwise even guitar players could play drums!

          Personally, I am only recently able to have some three way independence - it takes time and practice that all.

          One thing that is really helpful for me when I am trying to learn something new or difficult is - don't rag on me here - is to keep playing slower and slower until I can figure the relative motions out.

          Sometimes I have to go to 20 beats a minute. Many time I have to literally watch my right hand going up and down and figure out when the right foot a/or left hand hits its target. Then, suddenly, it all becomes simple.

          Animal - working on stuff like 2x4x8 is really cool. I need to do more of it.

          The classic exercise is to do quarters on the kick (four on the floor), quarters on the H-H on the upbeats, the "ands", and then do triplet time paradiddles around the kit with your hands. Makes you sound like a genius!

          There is a great drummer and teacher up here who stays great because he constantly challenges himself with stuff like this to do. A couple of years ago he was showing off an exercise he conquered:

          paradiddles between the feet (singles, doubles, triples) while playing paradiddles (singles, doubles, triples) with the hands around the kit - with the hands in different time signature then the feet!

          The mind boggles...
          Immensely powerful yet with a liquid cat-quick elegance

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by @oM:
            Hi,

            I would check out:
            www.mikemangini.com and the look for his RhythmKnowledge books. I don't have them, but from what I've seen in the examples, it looks very promising. (the guy is really insanely good, prove: http://www.mikemangini.com/MMmm/Pages/videos.html)
            that's so funny - i have been working on that one handed roll for a few weeks now. my drum teacher taught it me and it's not nearly as hard as it sounds. you use the rim of the drum as a second fulcrum of sorts to quickly jack out doubles (or triples). for me, it required tightening my grip more so that i usually would. the key is to move to arm straight up and down against the rim, and leave your wrist relatively straight. it feels a little unnatural but it works!



            [This message has been edited by digitsone (edited November 04, 2001).]

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            • #7
              Originally posted by gingerbaker:
              [b]Dan and Animal,

              Great posts! Dan - I thought I was going to wake up the whole house when I read your post. Funny!

              And you brought me back to how I felt when I was starting out - full of enthusiasm and frustration. A beautiful thing.

              ***I am enthusiastic, and I am having fun...especially thanks to THIS place with all of you guy's great advice!***-Dan

              And, hey, you don't suck - - its supposed to be difficult. Otherwise even guitar players could play drums!

              ****Ding!* Lucky I'm a bassist, or I might be offended! *** -Dan

              One thing that is really helpful for me when I am trying to learn something new or difficult is - don't rag on me here - is to keep playing slower and slower until I can figure the relative motions out.

              ***Here here....I'm like that with ANY of my instruments. It really helps to slow down to a crawl sometimes; get it together, then speed up slowly.***--Dan

              There is a great drummer and teacher up here who stays great because he constantly challenges himself with stuff like this to do. A couple of years ago he was showing off an exercise he conquered:

              paradiddles between the feet (singles, doubles, triples) while playing paradiddles (singles, doubles, triples) with the hands around the kit - with the hands in different time signature then the feet!

              (WHUMP! -Dan falling out of his chair)

              Man, that's just wrong!

              Seriously, great post, Gingerbaker! You really made me feel better. My eyes are almost always bigger than my stomach, so to speak I've been snapped back to reality so many times after trying something over my head that I have to play in a backbrace. But it almost never gets me down.

              I am very inspired by watching my Neil Peart video; I can't do 9/10ths of what he does, but I take a lot from it anyway to improve on what skill I DO have. It's the same with my bass and watching my Jaco video, or a Rush concert tape. Jaco and Geddy are astounding, and I can't play like that, but it doesn't mean I can't take something from the experience...I get something new everytime I watch


              ------------------
              www.mp3.com/entrylevel

              [This message has been edited by Dan the Speakerman (edited November 04, 2001).]
              Dan's Music Site; melodic, ethereal rock and more! Please have a listen :^)

              Comment


              • #8
                Ok. Here's a 2 against 3 lesson. This is how I developed my 2/3 polyrhythym.



                A. This is what we are attempting to get to.

                B. Play standard triplets hand to hand (RLR LRL RLR LRL)

                C. Leave one hand out. This gives you 3 notes over 2 beats. Sounds like a quarter note triplet to me. This was the big revelation. Triplets can be subdivided into smaller triplets.

                D. Go back to the hand to hand triplets and play the bass drum in quarters. Drop out your left hand and you have 2 against 3!

                E. This is the final breakdown. Using our triplet subdivisions we can break this polyrhythym into something more playable. Play the bottom line with your right hand and the top line with your left. Sing "trip-a-let, trip-a-let" while you are playing. This is the same thing as illustration A. simply written a different way. Practice this slow and steady. This will get you on your way to playing polyrhythyms.

                [This message has been edited by animal (edited November 04, 2001).]

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                • #9
                  Hey...

                  Also, think "Carol of the Bells"...the intro bit with the bells is essentially the same 2 to 3 rhythm. I knock on peoples doors like this all the time...drives them nuts...Do it with left and right hands with flams .

                  I don't claim to be much of a polyrhythm player, though I think I do more iof it than I know I do...I'm so untrained - but 19 years of playing generates some nice accidents, anyway.

                  redbrick
                  My Updated Website: https://blades.technology

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                  • #10
                    If any of you are having difficulty with the above exercises, I'd recommend concentrating on exercise a. above. (Only because it may be easier to visualize it written that way.) Start off playing the top line slowly with just your stronger hand and the bottom line with your stronger foot until you have it. Then try the other hand. Once you can switch back and forth try alternating strokes RLR LRL on the top, and even alternating feet. When you have that, don't forget to practice starting with your weaker hand and foot first.

                    When alternating RLR LRL, play your hands on separate drum(s)/cymbal(s). Next, either cross your hands and play the opposite pads ever 1st and 3rd beat, or simply change drums (or both), etc.

                    Practice like this is good on a bunch of levels. Sounds tedious written out like this, but really isn't. Once you can play any exercise like that, half the battle is won. Turn it inside out, and it is yours forever. If you can play a., it's just a quick jump to playing paradiddles for the top line with your hands (3 complete paradiddles to every 2 measures, and the whole thing resolving itself to beginning again with the same hand on 1 ever 4 measures). Sounds harder than it is, but you might make someone fall out of their chair when you tell them what you are doing and do this.

                    BTW just saw Redbrick's "Carol of the Bells" reference. I don't know the name of the song, (all I could think of is ..."Christmas is here, La la la la, etc.) but that is definitely the rhythm you should hear. Once you have it take the accents off 1 and 3 to prove to yourself it is really perfectly even notes on both the hands and the feet.

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                    • #11
                      Hey! We are talking edrums here arn't we?
                      Simply record the triplets and quarters one at a time in loop mode - no worries!!
                      Steve

                      'I only ever quote myself - except when I quote someone else' - me

                      , plenty of , and , , triggered acoustics, , and a plethora of PA blah blah freakin blah...I mean does anyone care about the specifics of pedals, speakers, processors, hardware or anything that I'm using?? :confused: Hmmm, maybe this is an appropriate place to mention that I tried out a new cymbal stand the other day...

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                      • #12
                        That's cheating!

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                        • #13
                          One..trip..let,.Two..tri-
                          Kick.......Kick (doh!)

                          One........trip.......let,......TWO!.....trip
                          Kick..................Kick (DAMMIT!)

                          Okay....

                          ONE!................trip.................let,
                          Kick......
                          *
                          *
                          *
                          Kick! ([email protected]!#$%@G S*@T!!!)



                          (Edrums hurled thru studio window)

                          ------------------
                          www.mp3.com/entrylevel



                          [This message has been edited by Dan the Speakerman (edited November 07, 2001).]
                          Dan's Music Site; melodic, ethereal rock and more! Please have a listen :^)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Oh....NOW I got it!

                            one trip kick let, two trip kick let....

                            Cool!

                            Now I just need some duct tape and a new window...

                            ------------------
                            www.mp3.com/entrylevel
                            Dan's Music Site; melodic, ethereal rock and more! Please have a listen :^)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Dan the Speakerman:
                              Oh....NOW I got it!

                              one trip kick let, two trip kick let....

                              Cool!

                              Now I just need some duct tape and a new window...

                              I assume you have "kick" on "one" and "two" too. If so, you probably do have it. If you can play it quite fast with no accents on any notes, your brain will let you hear both patterns a little easier, and that they are smooth evenly spaced notes in both cases.

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