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Newbies agree? The A's don't cut it!

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  • Newbies agree? The A's don't cut it!

    (A light hearted response to Steveo the Devo's recent post, and a general defense of e-drums)

    So, i have made an interesting observation since I have been at this board. There are not many drummers (by this I mean people who play drums) who are using their acoustic drums in an unadulterated form.

    There are large numbers of drummers who have left their A's behind in preference to Vdrums, Ddrums, and other electronic options.

    Others are using mics, processers, mixing boards, and PA's to perform live and record or adding aux. percussion to expand the A's repertoire.

    Others still are combining the A's with mesh heads and triggers to facilitate silent practice.

    So, obviously the A's just don't cut it on their own! Certainly once the honeymoon stage is over, people want more than the A's can provide.

    Comments? Let's here from you e-drummers still out there. (prove me right)

    All in good fun,
    Johnny

  • #2
    The A's don't cut it anymore. For me they didn't. I sacraficed looks for a drumset that was controlable for the size rooms my band was playing. At first I felt naked and alone not being total surronded by my ludwigs, sabians and gibraltar 2 tier cage. After about a year I was thinking I made the wrong choice then the V's came out and everything changed. I wasn't as naked and the sounds were way better. The band got over the look thing, heck I got over the look thing. Now everywhere I go everyone say the same thing...."THOSE DRUMS ARE AWESOME" which I reply...thanks. Granted E's are not for everyone but on the same note A's are not for everyone anymore. I am an E-DRUMMER and proud of it. Are A-Drummers better or worse? No, they play a different animal. LONG LIVE THE DRUMMING ANIMALS be it A's or E's!!!!!

    PS: Do piano players and keyboard players have the same arguments????

    ------------------
    Ted H.
    www.tocsinrocks.com
    Ted H.

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    • #3
      You are not listening to what I am saying...
      My e-drums go to Eleven.
      E-le-ven...
      E-drums: TD-20, RT-5S triggers on snare/toms, KD-7s, VH12, CY-14Cs, CY-15R, Pintech splash.
      A-drums: Zickos (amber) w/ all Zildjians.

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      • #4
        In my opinion the only disadvantages e-drums have are
        a: They don't play like a's, and
        b: They don't look like a's.

        I can live with that. The advantages, such as 100-odd different sets, ease of use in a live setting and not being obscured by two dozen mikes anymore are reason enough for me to never want to use my a's live again. Sure, I need outboard gear to make it all sound fantastic, but you need the same outboard gear to make a's sound good live, too!And then you have problems like mike leakage, feedback, soundcheck takes twice as long, etc.
        To me using a's live is just not worth the effort anymore.

        Stu
        "Fry that sound effect, Moriarty, we're having it for breakfast"

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        • #5
          Originally posted by johnrox:
          (A light hearted response to Steveo the Devo's recent post, and a general defense of e-drums)

          ...

          All in good fun,
          Johnny
          Johnny, you just did what I was going to do with "First gig prolems" - I was going to point out all the things that go wrong with accoustics when you gig that DON'T go wrong with electronics. Like tuning, humidity, broken heads (I have yet to even have my mesh heads LOOK played on after nearly 18 months of regular gigs), and so on. But, you beat me to it.

          Here's my bottom line, as I have said before - use what works for you. Period. E's and A's are two different instruments geared towards the same purpose - laying down backbeats behind the band. :-)

          (Ok, Ok, there's MORE to it than that, I know, but slappin' the 2 and the 4 is just about 90% of most modern drumming.)

          - Hans
          - Hans

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          • #6
            LOL

            You must have nearly been as bored as I was when I posted that thread!
            Steve

            'I only ever quote myself - except when I quote someone else' - me

            , plenty of , and , , triggered acoustics, , and a plethora of PA blah blah freakin blah...I mean does anyone care about the specifics of pedals, speakers, processors, hardware or anything that I'm using?? :confused: Hmmm, maybe this is an appropriate place to mention that I tried out a new cymbal stand the other day...

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            • #7
              Originally posted by mcconaghy:
              In my opinion the only disadvantages e-drums have are
              a: They don't play like a's, and
              b: They don't look like a's.
              The first reason is perhaps the biggest reason why more people don't play e-drums. But I look at it this way: I use acoustic drums as acoustic drums and electronic drums as electronic drums. Yes, I use acoustic sounds to gain more snares, different toms, etc. But I love the wide variety of percussion and non-acoustic sounds available. Can you imagine how much gear I'd be hauling if I owned every instrument in an Alesis D4, let alone a TD-8/10!?

              I believe in a happy mix of both types of drums, along with real cymbals.
              "I'm not a guitarist, but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night!"

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