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Taking the plunge...but need some advice

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  • Taking the plunge...but need some advice

    So - I ruled out the Yamahas (cheap ones are too cheap, expensive ones are too expensive.) I ruled out the Clavias (too simplistic.) What does that leave me? A TD8 V-Custom Kit.

    Just a couple of questions, though:
    - How many inputs can I use on the TD8 brain? Specifically, can I add two additional pads immediately, one for a cowbell, one for a tambourine?
    - How transportable are the things? That is, are they quick to break down/assemble and are there decent cases for them?
    - Is it possible to use crossovers to send the frequencies to different amps, as you would with a bi-amped hi-fi system? I would see the kick going through a Peavey bass combo most of the time, but think that snare/hats would lose definition and a guitar or keyboard (or even vocal) amp would be better. How feasible is this?

    I'm guessing these are pretty Frequently Asked Questions, but my life is too short to hunt through 10,000 past topics.....

    TIA (as always)

    Duncan

  • #2
    Originally posted by Duncan:
    I'm guessing these are pretty Frequently Asked Questions, but my life is too short to hunt through 10,000 past topics
    Ah, but you don't have to. Use the search.
    Roland TD-20 v1.08, various v-drums and v-cymbals, Yamaha KP65's, Axis pedals, Gibraltar hardware, Mackie 1202/SRM450 (pre-china)

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Duncan:
      I ruled out the Clavias (too simplistic.) What does that leave me? A TD8 V-Custom Kit.
      Don't forget to demo all those kits you mention and see if the amount of features is still the most important thing instead of sound quality.
      There are lots of people who are very happy with their V's, but there's also people who come to the conclusion that for their purposes ddrum would have been better after buying a Roland kit.

      Anyway; good luck with whatever e-drumkit you buy

      ------------------
      http://mpcman.flappie.nl
      Music was my first love...

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      • #4
        Originally posted by MPCman:
        Don't forget to demo all those kits you mention and see if the amount of features is still the most important thing instead of sound quality.
        There are lots of people who are very happy with their V's, but there's also people who come to the conclusion that for their purposes ddrum would have been better after buying a Roland kit.

        Anyway; good luck with whatever e-drumkit you buy
        Diplomatic response. I would have said I don't understand or don't agree with the Clavia observation. Clavia doesn't bundle in tons of interface or marginal features for features sake. They have concentrated on an approach. Simplistic, I'm not sure. Focused yes.

        Drum modeling is certainly intriguing, but understand that it, as well as your compression and eq and various effects are going to be limited to the processing power and programming of your module. Triggering samples allows you to pick sounds that may have been recorded with tens of thousands of dollars worth of professional effects. You "give up" tweakability in favor of tons of drop in choices, many of which sound great...but you can pick all that you want according to your tastes.

        These are just two different approaches. Both modules could do with better sample rates to begin with IMO, but I'm not sure I would call either simplistic.

        If ddrum offered higher sample rates, more memory and compatibility with certain pads, I'd buy their module over any other in an instant. I use the TD-10 as a pad to midi interface because it triggers the pads I prefer very well. I don't however, use the sequencer, and rarely use the effects. As for the sounds, I use some, but with outboard gear, and for the most part trigger sounds from my sampler. So, the non-simplistic bells and whistles Roland stuff certainly wasn't the lure for me. I use very very little of those features and then only in small amounts mixed with samples to retain playing dynamics inherent and superior in the module.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by dr. kildrum:
          If ddrum offered higher sample rates, more memory and compatibility with certain pads, I'd buy their module over any other in an instant.
          Higher sample rates: do you realy hear that? I've heard 12 bit drum samples with unknown sample rates (?? kHz), which blow away all todays drum sounds.

          I agree on the more memory and compatibility wish. Just a matter of time.


          Duncan, like MPCman said: give all kits a demo. Don't let fool you of Clavia's simple concept. Drums always were simple, weren't they?

          I would NOT run the e-drums through a bass amp. Different speakers which may get dammaged. Try a keyboard combo or active speaker like the Mackies en JBL's.
          Robert

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