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Books on TD-10 programming?

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  • Books on TD-10 programming?

    Is anyone aware of an instructional book on how to edit/create good drum sounds in COSM? Just bought the V-Session kit (killer!) with the TD-10exp but the user manual from Roland is useless for this purpose. Even an experienced acoustic drummer would be intimidated by all the variables. And to work out the principles by trial-and-error would take more years than I'll be on the planet.

    Interested in collaborating on writing one?

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    Orvel Ray Wilson, CSP
    Boulder, CO
    Orvel Ray Wilson, CSP
    Boulder, CO

  • #2
    Wait.....you mean the manual does not have an area where COSM and its perimeters are described - what can be tweaked, how to tweak them and the effects it will have on the sounds in the end?

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    szvook
    Studio

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    • #3
      Originally posted by OrvelRay:
      ...to work out the principles by trial-and-error would take more years than I'll be on the planet.
      I think you'll find (with a bit of patience and determination) that it's not as daunting as it may at first seem. The idea that there are virtually limitless combinations is intimidating, but convince yourself that's a good thing and try not think about it as otherwise.

      The best advice I feel I can give is to read the very brief descriptions of the various adjustable parameters in the manual and then experiment. The manual is no doubt general and leaves more than a little more to be desired.

      The best way to learn is by doing, so canonball into the soup and create a coherent kit to your liking. Start with a factory one that is perhaps your favorite at the moment, or that simply has a kick and/or snare sound that is close to what you want. Find the best sounding crashes on the module and move them over, same with toms. (You'll learn copy/move, etc. Find a ride, etc.

      Once you have the basic sounds in place, start editing. You may want to turn ambience off (or on and off periodically) while tweaking. If you know what you want everything to sound like, you are ahead of the game, if not play around until it is as good as you can make it.

      As things start to come together, you will want to make sure that the individual component sounds blend smoothly. Some toms might be overpowered by certain cymbals. Some cymbals simply "clash". This is a little more advanced, and overlooked by beginners, I think. Adjusting respective volumes and pitch and using complimentary sounds will go a long way, but then there are some valuable subtleties too.

      Anyway, it would be misleading to suggest that there is not a lot to it, but I think you'll find the learning enjoyable, and the curve flatter than it looks. Now if you really want to do this WELL, you are already on the most direct path, soliciting insight from those who have already logged the time.
      Interested in collaborating on writing one?
      As far as a book on COSM editing/modeling, anything more than a very informal free informational foray would likely not have a sufficient market and would probably require Roland's involvement/blessing. I see that you have already picked up on a thread here where one of the members here is spearheading putting together a FAQ/guide style document regarding V-drums. Maybe something on COSM techniques/tuition will be covered. It certainly sounds like it will be a useful resource in many respects in any event.

      While I'm happy to contribute to something ad hoc and not intended for publication, (where time permits), I would be considerably more interested in commercial collaberation on a technical e-drum reference. I have been a professional drummer for over 20 years, have read almost everything readily available on relavent contemporary gear, have tried almost all of it that I am aware of, and I too, am a published writer.

      By the way, welcome and congratulations on your new kit. There is an abundance of good information here in the archives, and plenty of experience (and no shortage of opinion) to draw on.


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      • #4
        While all of the variables can be daunting, I think part of the reward of using V-drums is figuring out how to get different sounds and effects and even resolving problems. Sometimes its frustrating when I'm getting some wierd sound coming out on a recording, but once I figure out something like how to assign a different instrument to the hi-hat edge and differnet volume to the hi-hat pedal I feel some level of satisfaction. I have discovered and mastered another element of the TD-10 that increases my expertise in the use of the instrument. Its rewarding then to lay down a new track and get the sound I was looking for. Maybe its perverse, but I almost prefer the trial and error method. I like the manual (no I don't work for Roland) because it gives you enough clues to get going, but leaves alot of room for discovery. Its like an unexplored universe!

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