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using PD-120 as a stand-alone trigger device

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  • using PD-120 as a stand-alone trigger device

    I hope to eventually build an entire V-kit, but for now all I want to do is buy a PD-120, put it on a snare stand, connect it to my Yamaha Clavinova (MIDI keyboard), and use it to trigger some of the Clavinova's percussive sounds. The keyboard already has it's own MIDI sounds and sequencer and is general MIDI compatable with standard MIDI IN and OUT jacks. Will it be just a simple matter of plugging it in, or do I have to purchase and use it with Roland's "TD-10??" (don't know model # for proper sequencer). Hoping this will be easy to hook up before purchasing the unit. Thanks for any assistance. -M
    Last edited by Maxmish; 08-06-07, 11:19 AM.

  • #2
    I hate to be the bringer of bad news, but it is unlikely that you can do this.
    The PD-120 utilises a piezo trigger that needs to be 'interpreted' by a module before it can be converted into MIDI. Unless your clav has an input for this type of trigger you will have to buy a TD-x (any module will do) or other (perhaps cheaper) drum module that takes external pads.
    Sorry. Good luck!
    Steve

    'I only ever quote myself - except when I quote someone else' - me

    , plenty of , and , , triggered acoustics, , and a plethora of PA blah blah freakin blah...I mean does anyone care about the specifics of pedals, speakers, processors, hardware or anything that I'm using?? :confused: Hmmm, maybe this is an appropriate place to mention that I tried out a new cymbal stand the other day...

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    • #3
      Mr. Devo,

      Thaks for your response. Yeah, it seemed too easy to just plug in it and have it work That's OK, I am willing to buy the module. After that, do you think there wil be anything particularly complicated involved?
      -Max Mothersbaugh

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      • #4
        Nope, pretty straight ahead. Hook up your cables, assign MIDI note numbers and away you go.
        Of course you can complicate things for yourself by layering the sounds of the module and Clav etc.... (not really that complicated). Some of the guys here are doing some pretty amazing stuff with MIDI, it would be a long process but a search on 'MIDI' would bring it out.
        Steve

        'I only ever quote myself - except when I quote someone else' - me

        , plenty of , and , , triggered acoustics, , and a plethora of PA blah blah freakin blah...I mean does anyone care about the specifics of pedals, speakers, processors, hardware or anything that I'm using?? :confused: Hmmm, maybe this is an appropriate place to mention that I tried out a new cymbal stand the other day...

        Comment


        • #5
          Don't know if cost is a factor, and if not, ignore this, but, a PD120 is about the most expensive pad you can buy, and modules aren't cheap either.

          If you already have your heart set on a mesh pad, PD100s are a little less, and other manufacturers make mesh pads for even less still. The TD-6 module is probably the best value for $ in a module, but you still really may not need all that you would be paying for. A pad to midi converter can be had for under $150, and a decent mesh pad can be found reasonably. If you don't need mesh, other types of great pads are readily available for under $100 or even less, used.

          In other words, you could spend $1500 on a pad and module or $200 for a pad and a converter, and anything in between to accomplish what you are saying. If money is no object, then not an issue. You might also consider something like a Handsonic or another multipad midi device (much more flexibility still).

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          • #6
            Doctor,

            Appreciate the input. You're right, for what I need now I don't have to spend so much. What I really want in the future is a full V-drum kit and I kind of fell for the Rolands when I last played them. So my thinking was to get a PD-120 to serve my purpose now, then it would be something I'd use in my future kit as well. But this brings to mind another question: For now I want a high quality "V-snare" with the best bounce and most realistic action possible (compare to acoustic). I want to seriously practice my rudiments on this drum. I currently have a DrumKat multipad and it is crap (for this level of snare playing). I know there are other trigger pad choices, but I just assumed PD-120 was the best choice in simulating snare play. Or would other (cheaper) mesh pads do the same thing for me? If so, any names I should look at?

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            • #7
              Hmmm. I was sorta off track. You are already able to trigger sounds from your Yamaha via midi from your DrumKat, but what your're after is a better playing surface then the Kat provides. Is that right?

              If so, try as many different pads as you can near you. Some folks swear by the more traditional e-pads (plastic/rubber), others prefer mesh or mylar. I chose mesh. These can be somewhat springy (sometimes referred to as trampoline effect), but good tensioning and double ply heads can mimimize this and provide a great playability.

              Keep in mind that you might probably have demo'd Roland pads with a Roland module that was providing positional sensing and/or separate head and rim sounds (i.e. rimshots/crossticks). You won't necessarily get all this functionality without a module without some rather complex wiring on your behalf. You will of course get the improved playability of triggering the sound you choose. (So I guess that's another point for modules if rimshots (i.e. two different snare sounds), etc. are important to you.)

              Another option is replacing your Kat with a multipad that provides inputs for additional standalone pads, (like a Roland SPD-XX). The SPD multipads could trigger the onboard sounds, or the sounds from your keyboard via midi (like the Kat), and so could other stand alone pads that you plug into an SPD's jacks. You could incorporate the SPD and the pads you add to it into a kit if/when you get around to getting a module.

              As for brands and further info, do a search on this site for past threads on any of these subjects. If you decide to go with a mesh pad, give Hart a look, they make great double ply mesh pads (Accupads) at a great price. If you elect to do something without buying a module yet, you will likely only need a single zone pad (again less $).

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              • #8
                What an well-run and intelligent message board this is! As I get more involoved in MIDI composition, I hope to contribute to it someday.
                Yes, you have addressed my specific objective. That should help me start my quest. I would also welcome comments from others about which pads to check out for snare-like action.

                -Maxmish

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                • #9
                  spds with a trigger drum module???

                  Hi guys, i want to make my spds' trigger inputs more! If this is possible (i dont know really) how can i use my Yamaha TMX drum module with spds? I tried and worked my two additional triggers via midi. But i couldn't work it out the third one! Is it the reality that spds works even the drum module only with two trigger inputs? Can u inform me pls?...thanx a lot.
                  Last edited by eko; 09-30-05, 01:00 PM.

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