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I thought this was an interesting twist

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  • I thought this was an interesting twist

    Drumkat Turbo 4.5, Emulator X3, Superior 2.1, Roland Fantom XR, DTXtreme III, SPD-20 etc.......

  • #2
    Sounds to me like a sales pitch to a buncha Yups!

    Comment


    • #3
      Pardon my French

      Where the F*CK did you find this?!?!?!

      I made a post over at the ddrum board asking about DTXtreme (among other things), and made the suggestion that DTXtreme could be the missing link between v-drums and ddrums(i.e. editing,sequencing,options vs. sampling,killer sounds,realism). I hinted that Yamaha's failure to take the e-drum market by storm could be attributed to their track record of gross marketing incompetence.
      The point was, Yamaha makes great products, offers decent product support, and always makes things as confusing as hell.

      I stated that it wouldn't suprise me at all if Yamaha had a white elephant on their hands. But nothing could prepare me for this:

      Roland is from Mars
      Clavia is from Venus
      Yamaha is from The Planet Of The Apes

      After the complete disbelief dies down, I still think DTXtreme probably still has it's merits. But this makes me want to vomit. At least they still make decent acoustic guitars.

      Johnny

      P.S. Then again, who wants to market a product to broke-ass musicians, everybody knows we ain't got no money. Maybe Yamaha is the sharpest tool in the shed.


      [This message has been edited by johnrox (edited August 12, 2001).]

      [This message has been edited by johnrox (edited August 12, 2001).]

      [This message has been edited by johnrox (edited August 12, 2001).]

      Comment


      • #4
        What I find interesting is that suddenly the DTXtreme isn't electronic anymore, it's part of their Silent series... when did that happen?
        This article disturbed me, I need a smoke...

        Stu
        "Fry that sound effect, Moriarty, we're having it for breakfast"

        Comment


        • #5
          I had the same thought about Yamaha recouping production costs, but if the last paragraph is to be believed, it sounds like it's working. I don't have a problem with non drummers playing Edrums, I mean why not? Yamaha's philosophy is that music can be a pastime to be enjoyed by everyone not just musicians and to that end it's cool.
          Drumkat Turbo 4.5, Emulator X3, Superior 2.1, Roland Fantom XR, DTXtreme III, SPD-20 etc.......

          Comment


          • #6
            Feefs got his 'ear to the ground'. This board's lucky to have a Cat like this hanging around.

            [This message has been edited by Traps (edited August 12, 2001).]

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Traps:
              Feefs got his 'ear to the ground'. This board's lucky to have a Cat like this hanging around.
              The definition of maturity?
              Steve

              'I only ever quote myself - except when I quote someone else' - me

              , plenty of , and , , triggered acoustics, , and a plethora of PA blah blah freakin blah...I mean does anyone care about the specifics of pedals, speakers, processors, hardware or anything that I'm using?? :confused: Hmmm, maybe this is an appropriate place to mention that I tried out a new cymbal stand the other day...

              Comment


              • #8
                many find the attitude of 'banging on those drums must relieve alot of stress' to be a bit condescending to our art and craft, like we're not doing it for the purpose of creating music, and that just anyone can do it, with drums not being instruments, but punching bags.

                I agree with jrcel and feefer in that "non-musicians" are welcome (gotta learn somehow); however I find that almost everyone is (or thinks they are) a drummer. Since I've always left my drum-set set up in my place whenever possible, I've had the chance over the years to see many different people's reaction to them. Most people jump on them and start playing like they are dethroning John Bonham whereas all they are doing is causing severe ear damage. Sure there are some who want nothing to do with them and some that admit they can't play and want to try. That's no problem. The "problem" lies with the people who think that "beating" on drums requires no talent, no coordination, or no sense of music. The attitude seems to be "if I can tap my foot to the music then I can lay down a drum track to it."

                I've always wanted to do an experiment just to prove this point. I'd like to set up a studio of equipment and let people who don't play music go through unattended and see what happens. I imagine it would go something like this:

                Play with the cool sounds on the keyboard. Get tired of that then play some "Smoke On The Water" or something for a few minutes on guitar. Get tired of that then look at the bass. Then sit on the drums and proceed to beat the living crap out of them thinking maybe they can get Rush back together.

                I don't know, just my pet peeve I guess. Hey who knows maybe I can get a government grant.
                God knows there aren't enough "studies" out there.

                Comment


                • #9
                  One thing I've noticed is that people steer clear of bongos. Hand drums, in general, intimidate people, but especially bongos. Beating things with sticks, I suppose, seems easier to non-drummers.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I dunno, K-Chuck; the one piece of drumming gear my wife allows to decorate our living room is a Djembe, and nobody seems to hesitate to walk in, say "hey, is this a drum?" and whack away on it.

                    I agree, though, that the old idea that drummers aren't musicians still prevails. I also play a bit of bass, sing, and do some recording engineering, but the drums will always be my main instrument of expression.

                    FWIW, most any knowledgeable and experienced musician will acknowledge that percussion takes every bit as much talent, as well as more physical strenght & endurance, as any other instrument.

                    Let 'em think what they want. They are usually quite ready to shut the hell up and eat crow when I sit down and play...

                    -Danny
                    -Danny

                    Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by fartnokker:
                      FWIW, most any knowledgeable and experienced musician will acknowledge that percussion takes every bit as much talent, as well as more physical strenght & endurance, as any other instrument.
                      I'll go one further, drumming alone does all that. A fully accomplished percussionist (piano, mallet intruments, etc. being percussion instruments) will likely in addition be skilled in the same music theory and vocabulary that other musicians are as well as drum tab and playing drums. Its really multiple skillsets.

                      Both the (trap-kit) drummer and the full fledged percussionist understand and play multiple percussive intruments (usually simultaneously) and most do so with both hands and both feet.

                      Its a bit like the relationship between physicians and veterinarians. The (people) doctors often look down their noses at the (animal) doctors, when in actuality, it takes a good deal longer to become a skilled vet because you are dealing with so many more anatomies, etc. But there the similarity ends. (I don't want someone to suggest that the life of a percussion track may somehow be less significant than the life of a guitar track. After all, everyone knows that in every dance that is music, the drummer leads. There is a good reason for that.)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Well said, Doc. Great member ID; are you Steve Wacholz, or just a fan?

                        I don't consider myself a true multi-percussionist, since I never studied piano, and very, very little mallet percussion. Mostly tymps, classical snare, marching, & traps. I do read music, albeit much more slowly than I used to (!), sing, play some bass guitar mainly for songwriting & pleasure, and have performed/recorded in the jazz, country, pop, rock, industrial, and progressive genres. I've done sessions where I never heard/saw the material until the tape & click track were rolling. I've recorded songs from memory to nothing but a click track. I call myself a drummer, but I don't really think I'm any less a "musician" than the clown who fumbles over 3-chord tablature in the latest issue of Guitar Player magazine.

                        I had about 6 years of formal instruction, and have been pretty much self-educated (not counting clinics and books/videos as outside education) in the 18 years or so since. Although I know I could benefit (who couldn't?) from a good teacher, I can't seem to schedule the time. Am I less of a musician than the guy who knows 3 chords & can't sing in key?

                        I have worked as an assistant recording engineer and co-producer. I have teched for others, and done some teaching as well. I write and arrange songs, program sequences, play amateur live sound engineer, and have been a booking agent as well.

                        Am I special? No, I'm a typical drummer. But nobody can intelligently argue that I'm not a musician. Moral of the story? All you drummers out there, don't take any crap from your bandmates!!!! As the Doc says, drummers are the heartbeat, the very soul and driving force of any band.

                        -Danny
                        Seattle
                        -Danny

                        Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks, I like your ID as well. And I'm definitely a Wacholz fan.

                          Originally posted by fartnokker:
                          Am I less of a musician than the guy who knows 3 chords & can't sing in key?
                          I'm pretty sure this was a rhetorical question, but, obviously you are not, and IMO it is actually pretty common to find that drummers are often more versatile than other musicians.

                          Doesn't it just chap your a$$ to be condescended to by that guy you describe.

                          [This message has been edited by dr. kildrum (edited August 21, 2001).]

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Ahhh, not really... I'll usually ask him if he prefers to work his solos within the context of the "circle of fifths" and watch most of them stare dumbly like a deer in headlights...

                            After teaching numerous guitar players how to set their action and intonation, as well as how to work their gear, they usually offer me the respect of an equal -- at least! Not to mention, I usually know quite a few more cover tunes off the top of my head than almost anyone I play with. Always a fun and helpful trick!

                            Never know when you'll need to pull "Gimme Some Lovin'" by Spencer Davis, "Junior's Farm" by McCartney and Wings, "Gimme Three Steps" by Lynrd Skynrd, "Over the Mountain" by Ozzy, "Deja Vu" by Yngwie Malmsteen, and "Jesus or a Gun" by Fuel out of your ass... all in one gig!

                            -Danny
                            -Danny

                            Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life.

                            Comment

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