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Defining crash settings

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  • Defining crash settings

    With all those crash, splash and china's in my TD-10xp to choose from, each individually editable, I can't get together the right combination of setting for my triggers. I keep searching and changing the settings. I know you can keep tuning kits for years if you don't leave the buttons alone but my combination of crashes just isn't right.

    Is there any basic method in defining the combination of crashes. Or someone of you out there who developed a method?

    I have three PD-9's, so six crashes to define.

    Ronald

  • #2
    Just go by whatever music type(s) you like (playing or listening) and go from there. The first thing I did when I got my TD-8 was to play many CDís, tapes and LPís for my music types and other music types while sitting on my drums and pick the sounds from the TD and tweak them to come as close as possible to the recordings. In some cases I would come across a sound that I would find in the TD that was not as close to what I wanted, as I wanted, but it had itís own personality and I could work with it.

    My .02 cents.


    ------------------
    szvook
    Studio

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    • #3
      Originally posted by RHendriks:
      With all those crash, splash and china's in my TD-10xp to choose from, each individually editable, I can't get together the right combination of setting for my triggers.....

      Is there any basic method in defining the combination of crashes. Or someone of you out there who developed a method?

      Ronald
      I treated my e-sounds just like they were a-sounds. I select hats and rides first (cause you hit those the most), then I build my accent sounds (crashes, splashes, china, etc.) up around those.

      To whittle them down, I went through all the sounds, one by one, determining playability and marking them in my manual (like, dislike, interesting but not useful for normal playing, etc...) Then took the sounds I had marked that I like and build most of my cymbal sets from those...

      I don't think there's an easy way really... especially if yer really picky! "I just KNOW the perfect 18 med-thin crash is in that brain SOMEWHERE!"

      ------------------
      \oo/_ _\oo/

      [This message has been edited by rus (edited August 02, 2001).]
      \oo/_ :mad: _\oo/

      Comment


      • #4
        I treated my e-sounds just like they were a-sounds.
        Simple statement, but a good starting point. Usefull tip.

        To whittle them down, I went through all the sounds, one by one, determining playability and marking them in my manual (like, dislike, interesting but not useful for normal playing, etc...) Then took the sounds I had marked that I like and build most of my cymbal sets from those...
        Can you tell me how you got together the combination. Did you just picked several crashes you liked and listened if they are a good combination, or was there a structured way in finding them?
        Did you do anything with the cymbal settings (pitch) or were the standard settings satisfactory?

        I don't think there's an easy way really... especially if yer really picky!
        Yes Your Honour, I admit I'm guilty of that.

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