Announcement

Collapse

Lounge Posting Guidelines

E-DRUMMING DISCUSSION ONLY! DO NOT POST PRODUCT OR TECHNICAL QUESTIONS!

Having issues? Please visit our Forum Talk section for answers to frequently asked questions.

See more
See less

Learning...

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Learning...

    What is the best way to learn? I see a lot of videos out there.. any reccomendations?

    Any teachers in the So. Cal area (specifically San Fernando Valley / Santa Clarita)?

    Thanks!

  • #2
    1. Are you referring to playing drums in general?

    2. Are you referring to learning to play edrums compared to acoustic?

    There are a lot of videos for both edrums and acoustic. Try a search on this site in the meantime.


    ------------------
    szvook
    Studio

    Comment


    • #3
      Sorry I wasn't more specific...

      I have played musical instruments before, mostly string instruments. I am looking to learn to play the drums, in general. Beats, correct way of striking them, read the music perhaps, etc. When I bang on them it all sounds like mush.. so I would like some structure behind it so I know what to do.

      Any videos you can reccomend to start with?

      Comment


      • #4
        It may be better to get a couple of lessons with a Drum teacher first.
        Teachers can give you feed back on technique that a video can't.
        www.royfulton.co.uk, www.zendrum.com ,Tempus Drums, Istanbul Agop, Regal Tip, Alesis DMPro, D4,Garageband, HK Powerworks PA

        Comment


        • #5
          Listen to the Mustang man. Go with lessons if you can afford them. Otherwise see if you can pick up the video 'Back to Basics' by Dave Weckl.
          I've been drumming for years and I still get reduced to tears everytime I watch it!
          Steve

          'I only ever quote myself - except when I quote someone else' - me

          , plenty of , and , , triggered acoustics, , and a plethora of PA blah blah freakin blah...I mean does anyone care about the specifics of pedals, speakers, processors, hardware or anything that I'm using?? :confused: Hmmm, maybe this is an appropriate place to mention that I tried out a new cymbal stand the other day...

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Steveo the Devo:
            Otherwise see if you can pick up the video 'Back to Basics' by Dave Weckl.
            I've been drumming for years and I still get reduced to tears everytime I watch it!
            I was in the local music store the other day and caught Simon Phillips on tape. Was real impressed but what he was doing was beyond my capabilities. I'd like to start getting some tapes which after a few weeks could actually do some of this stuff. (Father's day is just around the corner.) Soooo...

            Same question as Houdini but more specific: Any recommendation for tapes geared for the intermediate player that actually teach you the licks in a detailed and logical sequence? My goal is to actually be able to play this stuff with maybe a month or so of practice. Some of what I saw would take a year or more to learn (at least for me it would)!

            Were you just jazzed by Weckl's abilities or are you saying it was more focused on teaching?

            I like brief portions of them playing stuff that knocks your socks off but by goal is to lean some of this stuff in the not too distant future?
            Kit Pic 1 Kit Pic 2 Kit Pic 3... And FOR SALE I have: 3 PD-9's, MDS-10 purple rack w/cables/pad and cym mounts. See classified posts for details or PM me.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by harryhoudini:
              What is the best way to learn? I see a lot of videos out there.. any reccomendations?

              Any teachers in the So. Cal area (specifically San Fernando Valley / Santa Clarita)?

              Thanks!
              Yes, by all means find a teacher. You might begin by going to your local music shops that sell drums. Most Mom & Pops host instrument lessons. You might also try educational institutions that have a band department.

              As for a video. If it is rock drumming you want to learn AND at it's most basic levels, I would recommend a video from this old dude from the '60's. IMHO this old dude is the godfather of power rock drumming and spawned a host of power drummers that shall remain nameless for fear of starting a riot. I cannot recommend this video for "seasoned" drummers. There is also an accomanying book that the video uses certain chapters from. I purchased them recently out of sheer curiousity. I found it way too basic and did not get much out of it, but for someone who comes along and says, "hey, I think want to learn how to play rock & roll drums", this will do. Also, unlike the picture on the video cover, the instructor uses just a hi-hat, snare & 2 bass drums. You may not need a teacher if drumming is in your blood, but I still say to seek one out. Here is the Amazon.com link.

              http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/AS...564668-6648912

              Comment


              • #8
                Boingo, the Weckl vid is great for a couple of reasons:

                1. It doesn't really go into technical stuff. Rather it lays down the basic for good technique. It doesn't teach 'licks' as such. It focuses on stuff like stick control, rolling (single, double, paradiddles...), timing, counting and strength building exercises.

                2. It totally goes into technical stuff. An experienced drummer can learn heaps about all the above stuff. Personally I found it great for correcting a lot of my poor habits (gained from years of 'teaching' myself) and for pushing me to be accurate in my playing.

                This being said, the 'Back to basics' vid is a video that you will use long into your drumming life. What you learn from it as a beginner will be different from what you will learn a little farther down the track. Whenever I hit a 'flat spot' in my practice (you know, can't find the motivation to practice), I watch it to inspire me.

                To be sure, it is not the be all and end all of drumming videos (Carmine's vid is also great - Marc good choice!) but it is the video that I can recommend to all drummers regardless of ability. Of all the people I know who have bought the video, I don't know of one who has regretted it.

                Boingo, as far as learning licks in a logical sequence. The Jeff Pocaro video is great. He deals a lot with dynamics and spends a fair bit of time on the 'shuffle' groove. He is (was) my hero, oh to drum like Jeff!

                Having taught myself, learnt from video's and had a number of teachers, I would have to say that you get a lot more from one on one tuition than by watching a video. The greatest problem is finding a good teacher. Just because you find a good drummer, doesn't mean he/she is a good teacher. Talk to their students (if you can find them), discuss lesson outlines and plans, what they expect from you, what you expect from them, do they work in a logical sequence, do they teach from a book or design their own programs, are they versatile in a number of different styles or are they pure rock, jazz etc (has pros and cons), do they have any formal qualifications, what experience have they had with live and studio drumming? Usually a good teacher is one who has turned out fine drummers over a number of years.
                All teachers have their strengths and weaknesses. If you know what their strength is in a particular area then go with them to learn that thing, go to another to learn from their strength. HOWEVER, if you are only beginning then get the basics down pat first, don't chop and change.

                and that was Steve's two cents on drum teachers....

                Good luck
                Steve

                'I only ever quote myself - except when I quote someone else' - me

                , plenty of , and , , triggered acoustics, , and a plethora of PA blah blah freakin blah...I mean does anyone care about the specifics of pedals, speakers, processors, hardware or anything that I'm using?? :confused: Hmmm, maybe this is an appropriate place to mention that I tried out a new cymbal stand the other day...

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks Steveo. The local shop has Weckl so I guess I'll be unwrapping it next Sunday. I like Weckl and have several of his CD's so it should be a good fit.

                  A lot of what you said about teachers is right on. The wife took up guitar a year ago and is having troule finding a decent teacher. She also spent quite a few bucks on video tapes which were pretty dismal. Since you normally don't get to view the tapes in advance, you have to buy on faith. Most tapes are rather pricey to do the faith thing more than a couple times.

                  It's been over 30 years since I had lessons. I was fortunate to have a great teacher and a lot has stuck with me over the years, but I need to do something to get out of some bad habits and move on to another level. Keeping the beat and having a few licks doesn't cut it for too long.

                  Thanks again.
                  Kit Pic 1 Kit Pic 2 Kit Pic 3... And FOR SALE I have: 3 PD-9's, MDS-10 purple rack w/cables/pad and cym mounts. See classified posts for details or PM me.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Boingo:
                    ... Keeping the beat and having a few licks doesn't cut it for too long.
                    Oh, I don't know about that. Does not seem to have phased Richard Starkey's career by much.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Steveo the Devo:
                      Boingo, the Weckl vid is great for a couple of reasons:
                      Got the video for Father's Day. Awesome! It's exactly what I need to get started.

                      Thanks Steveo.....
                      Kit Pic 1 Kit Pic 2 Kit Pic 3... And FOR SALE I have: 3 PD-9's, MDS-10 purple rack w/cables/pad and cym mounts. See classified posts for details or PM me.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Glad to hear it!
                        Steve

                        'I only ever quote myself - except when I quote someone else' - me

                        , plenty of , and , , triggered acoustics, , and a plethora of PA blah blah freakin blah...I mean does anyone care about the specifics of pedals, speakers, processors, hardware or anything that I'm using?? :confused: Hmmm, maybe this is an appropriate place to mention that I tried out a new cymbal stand the other day...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Chet McKraken (however you spell it) was the first video I ever watched. It was real good for beginners. He breaks down a paradiddle and shows you how to play a single, double, and triple, then utilizes it in a song. I learned a lot from that one. I then went to Dave Weckl. No comment needed on that one. Everyone has praised that one, so I don't have to. I think Carmine Appice was the next one. Carmine was great for getting into double bass (even with one foot), odd-times, soloing, independance, etc...
                          Stay away from the Terry Bozzio tapes, you wont really learn anything.

                          The list of all the videos I've seen is:
                          Dave Weckl**
                          Chet McKraken**
                          Carmine Appice**
                          Terry Bozzio (2 of them)
                          Randy Castillo**
                          Simon Phillips
                          Doane Perry
                          Greg Bissonette
                          Dennis Chambers**
                          Joe Morello*
                          Jim Chapin*** (fastest hands I've ever seen!)
                          Mike Portnoy
                          Rod Morgenstein**
                          Tommy Aldridge
                          Billy Cobham
                          I think that's all...

                          I can comment on any of the above if you are considering them. Personal favorites are marked(*). For any serious player, I highly recommend Jim Chapin. My speed has drastically improved. His technique is second to none. This video can get boring, but if you can nail the material, it will be so worth it.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I just noticed that the Carmine video in the first post is not the same one that I had. The one I watched was Power Rock Drum Clinic or something. I was recorded live at a drums clinic, so people ask questions and stuff.

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X