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Aphex Twin

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  • Aphex Twin

    I was listening to an electronic music compilation and heard the track 'Girl-Boy Song' by Aphex Twin. It was the only tune I liked. The drum track was amazing. I messed around on the V's trying to cop some of it. Very inspirational. One of the things I liked best about the track is that it didn't rely on other electronic sounds...it's basically a string section with a hopped up percussion track (if the strings were synthesized they were very convincing). It also wasn't beat-heavy like most dance-oriented electronic music...the percussion became a lead instrument, it seemed, rather than a static, song-length throbbing.

    Anyway I think a few of you on here are into this kind of music...svook I think you play in a drum & bass kind of band, and I remember Postnukklear mentioning AT before...is all his stuff like this? I wonder if you can make some listening recommendations.

    DJourg

  • #2
    IIIIIIIIIIII WANT YOUR SOULLLLLLLLLL
    Music was my first love...

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    • #3
      IIIIIII WIILLLL EEAATT YYOOUURRRRR SOOOUUUULLLLLLL!!!!!

      :
      TD-8, Pintech pads, Pearl rack, Mackie SRM-450, Behringer 802 mixer and DSP1400 UltraMizer, Electric Sticks.

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      • #4
        COME TO DADDY !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

        Now were TALKING!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

        Now you have touched the sweat spot in my heart.

        Richard D. James aka - Aphex Twin, Polygon Window, Dice Man, AFX - plus Orbital, Prodigy, Chemical Brothers, Moby (early stuff and now) The Orb, Atari Teenage Riot, Meat Beat Manifesto, Front242, NIN, Frontline Assembly – I can go and on. That is what my POISON has been forever and my professional career consists of !!!!!!!!!!

        This is the type of music that my band I play live, the bands/artists mentioned above are our influences and their music is not the style of “techno” that will get you bored at all.
        As some may have noticed, the patterns are more complex than commonly found in other music types and the use of outboard gear to create the sounds that are found in these styles is a MUST – that is why you hear the drums (for example) to be slamming like no other style. And we play this s_h_i_t live and I can’t get enough of it. Not to many techno bands play live with edrums at this time (although more and more are doing now-mostly acoustic and a few edrums), so I take pride in what my band and I are pushing.
        It takes me at least 2-3 hours to come down after each gig. The BPM, the sounds the audience in your hands and the energy turns on the green light in side of me and the only thing I want to is to TEAR IT UP when we go on. NO SENSATION LIKE IT !!!

        If I did not play this style I would be playing some thing heavy for sure, but this is what I LOVE and grew up playing.

        Thank for the pick me up Djourg that hit the spot! Give “On” by Aphex Twin a listen, very good album – since you liked the drums on “Girl Boy Song”. Actually a lot of his stuff is really good (some weird, but that depends who is asking) never the less it’s creative.


        And as far as Aphex Twin, this guy is a mad genius! The sound he creates and the beat patterns with the tempo, melodies, etc – no one comes close (although some have made good attempts).

        You want to talk about custom sounds that seem to stay with you and want to find a way to get those sounds and you can’t sleep (sorry rambling in dismay), this guy would take apart what ever synth/module he had (as a kid – this guy has music out since he was 15 years old and it sounds as dope as his new stuff does) and rewire the synth/module completely to suit the needs of his sounds. Then add a ton of outboard gear on top of that and then you get those drum sounds that knock you of your feet in a venue.

        I have come close to some of the sounds the Aphex Twin uses for drums, with my TD-8 and using my outboard gear. And do to my BBE, Aphex Aural Exciter, Focusrite Compounder, Behringer 4-Band Parametric Tube Equalizer T1951 and newly obtained Drawmer DL241 Auto-Compressor - I’ am getting closer.


        Today was a good day


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        szvook

        [This message has been edited by szvook (edited May 27, 2001).]
        Studio

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        • #5
          Well, the tracks from the 'Richard D James' album, which is probably my favourite stuff, but you've also got to love the 'Come To Daddy' EP (8 track version is best).

          Generally, his earlier stuff as Aphex Twin is more ambient, his later stuff more techno and 'drill 'n' bass' (his version of drum & bass). He's also done loads of side-projects under other pseudonyms, which tend to be more wacky, occasionally veering into 'happy hardcore' territory. Lastly, he's done many remixes. Check out 'Richard's Hairpiece', his version of 'Devil's Hairpiece' by Beck (I think it's a B-side on the single) or his spooky remix of the Philip Glass orchestration of David Bowie's 'Heroes'.

          Anyway,

          COME TO DADDY, COME TO DADDY, COME TO DADDY, COME TO DADDY, COME TO DADDY, COME TO DADDY, COME TO DADDY, COME TO DADDY, COME TO DADDY, COME TO DADDY, COME TO DADDY, COME TO DADDY, COME TO DADDY, COME TO DADDY, COME TO DADDY, COME TO DADDY, COME TO DADDY, COME TO DADDY etc. ad nauseam

          Tee hee

          Schmunk

          ------------------
          TD-8, Pintech pads, Pearl rack, PM-3, Behringer 802 mixer and DSP1400 UltraMizer
          TD-8, Pintech pads, Pearl rack, Mackie SRM-450, Behringer 802 mixer and DSP1400 UltraMizer, Electric Sticks.

          Comment


          • #6
            I think it's kinda funny that Aphex Twin did a remix from Mescalum United(hope I said that right). Mescalum United is Marc Acardipane and he is seen as one of the starters of the hardcore/gabber music style. When you listen to his old music and that from Aphex Twin too, it sounds pretty much the same. I think it's cool that from that point their music developed in quit a different way.
            Music was my first love...

            Comment


            • #7
              Also give Squarepusher a listen, very similar music, slightly more "normal" compared to Richard's stuff, but no less entertaining and challenging.

              I LOVE APHEX TWIN!!!!

              Stu
              "Fry that sound effect, Moriarty, we're having it for breakfast"

              Comment


              • #8
                Come to Daddy is a phat project indeed. I still warm up to that track with the low and mids dropped.






                ------------------
                szvook
                Studio

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by mcconaghy:
                  Also give Squarepusher a listen, very similar music, slightly more "normal" compared to Richard's stuff, but no less entertaining and challenging.

                  I LOVE APHEX TWIN!!!!

                  Stu

                  Yes, Squarepusher is very talented as well and has a similar approach to electronic music, as does Aphex Twin – no wander Aphex Twin signed him to his label, Rephlex Records.

                  I love jazz and Squarepusher managed to fuse electronica and jazz together, “Music Is Rotted One Note” is a very intelligent project with strong production entirely done by Tom Jenkinson aka Squarepusher.

                  Also I need to mention Autechre, since we are discussing Aphex Twin and similar styles and sounds. Autechre is another excellent group and their “Tri Repetae” album form TVT/WAX TRAX records is worth checking out.



                  ------------------
                  szvook
                  Studio

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                  • #10
                    Since we are on the “techno” subject, how do you people see the use of V-Drums in that style? As you can see/hear, the natural sounds are not needed rather; phat, compressed, enhanced sounds are required. If you sat on your V-Drums could you come up with sounds to use after listening to Aphex Twin, for example?

                    I’ am just curious what your results would be? – with and without outboard gear.

                    This is where I stand when it comes to sounds. I have created the sounds in my Td-8 that I would use for a Rock, Metal, Jazz, etc applications but I got my Td-8 for the techno needs, so I tweak the f_u_c_k out of the sounds and run them through my outboard gear to get that effect.


                    ------------------
                    szvook

                    [This message has been edited by szvook (edited May 27, 2001).]
                    Studio

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      One additional track I love form Come To Daddy album by Aphex Twin is the last track “IZ-US” – a beautiful example of electronica done in the right hands.

                      I also have to give props to my first influence’s that started this madness – Kraftwerk and Can. Those two bands influenced me to play techno since I was a young kid back in 1979 and I haven’t stopped yet.


                      ------------------
                      szvook
                      Studio

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                      • #12
                        So, szvook, who are your band? DO you have any recorded output which I could d/l from the 'net?

                        Schmunk

                        ------------------
                        TD-8, Pintech pads, Pearl rack, PM-3, Behringer 802 mixer and DSP1400 UltraMizer
                        TD-8, Pintech pads, Pearl rack, Mackie SRM-450, Behringer 802 mixer and DSP1400 UltraMizer, Electric Sticks.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I am actually quite familiar with many of the artists you mentioned, Svook, particularly the WaxTrax industrial bands, plus original industrialists like Test Department and Einsturzende Neubauten, and electronica stuff like Orbital and the Orb (the Orb's 'Orbus Terrarus' has been getting heavy rotation in my CD player too).

                          I started to get into electronica but the throbbing beats wore out its welcome real fast with me. But James has something else going. The way he's using those drum machines seems to be like a lead instrument, with little regard to timekeeping or groove....a connection I make to some of the free-jazz drumming I've become familiar with over the last few years. drum machines could come into their own as an instrument.

                          I strongly urge a listen to Ikue Mori, a Japanese-American woman who works exlclusively with drum machines. However, she dispenses completely with kick-drum/snare-drum backbeat-based patterns and uses her set up to work with a creative set of signature sounds, offering rhythms based more on organic feel than strict, computerized machine music. Her work is quite abstract but no less exhilarating.

                          A good way to start: On Napster I found a track named 'Rock On' credited to Ikue Mori, DJ Olive, and Jim O'Rourke. Look for this; I haven't found this anywhere else. It's wonderful...if baby computers could dream, this would be the soundtrack...I believe it may be my favorite electronic music track of all time.

                          Also, I recommend 'Death Praxis -- Mystery' which is a good bargain...two albums in one. That's my favorite, other good ones are 'Hex Kitchen' and 'One Hundred Aspects of the Moon', off of the Tzadik label(www.tzadik.com, also avail. on Tower, Amazon, etc.);

                          [This message has been edited by DJourg (edited May 27, 2001).]

                          [This message has been edited by DJourg (edited May 27, 2001).]

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                          • #14
                            Svook writes: Since we are on the “techno” subject, how do you people see the use of V-Drums in that style? As you can see/hear, the natural sounds are not needed rather; phat, compressed, enhanced sounds are required. If you sat on your V-Drums could you come up with sounds to use after listening to Aphex Twin, for example?

                            Well, now we're on to something. This inquiry was part of an ongoing investigation regarding the role of electronic drums in music in general...

                            (a subject that has gotten curiously little attention in this electronic drumming forum)

                            Where's the place for the electronic drummer? Where does it fit...I don't think it's rock, I don't think it's jazz (not the straight-ahead kind anyway). Some modern classical has taken interesting electronic turns (i.e. Xenakis, Stockhausen, Terry Riley) but I have found very little for the electronic drummer to sink his/her teeth into (one very odd exception noted at the end of this post**).

                            Obviously, there's industrial and techno/electronica. But the drumming here is based on drum machine programming. As artists like James, Mori, and others have demonstrated, this can be artfully done. Why would they need a live drummer, acoustic or electronic--just for show?

                            What can a drummer do that a drum machine cannot? You all can come up with several answers, but here's mine:

                            Improvise.

                            'Girl/Boy Song' sounds to me like a really fast electronic drummer improvising over a straight-playing string quartet. Now what if the strings returned the improvisation...no drum machine could react to that (though an experienced drum machine programmer could...Ms. Mori has been part of many improvising ensembles).

                            More than anything, 'Girl/Boy' suggested to me the timbres and techniques that can be used that are exclusively electronic.

                            Svook, you ask about using the TD-8 for reproducing these sounds. I have the TD-10exp which has on-board effects which are helpful. Yesterday I spent several hours with the CD walkman draining the batteries by alternating between play and pause trying to tweak my sounds to 'Girl/Boy'. Layering would have been helpful. Had to assign kick sounds to toms for those fast rolls. Created some simple 'one-shot' sequences to fire off. Even the cheesy effects samples were useful with some tweaking.

                            Tried playing those fast patterns: very sloppy, very sloppy indeed, this human. Fun, though.

                            In andy case I've found in trying to cop a particular sound that the point isn't the destination, it's the trip; meaning though I never get an exact imitation I do get something that's different and maybe even better: something that's my own.

                            Svook, having never seen or heard your band*** I can't comment on your role in it; esp. relative to the common (universal?) use of drum machines in this music. What do you think?

                            In fact, techno/electronica is a one-man-band type music...these 'bands' are usually one guy. This would apply to some of the industrial bands, too. It's all programming, which only takes one person. To make it performance-based, with a band....seems like there would be a change in music.

                            ***Svook how many people are in your band/bands? What instruments are included? Is it straight electronic music, or is it kind of a rock/electronic hybrid? Is there room for improvising?

                            Everyone, thanks for the responses and sorry for the long post. This is something I've been giving a lot of thought to for some time.

                            DJourg

                            "(one very odd exception noted at the end of this post**)": The Kronos Quartet, a modern string quartet specializing in modern/minimalist composition, has a CD out called 'Caravan'; they perform mostly world-music tunes, most of which are forgettable. However, there is this one very weird track called 'Cortejo Fúnebre en el Monte Diablo', composed by the eminent experimental composer Terry Riley. It is actually mostly an electronic percussion track with strings...ironically enough that's how I'd describe 'Girl/Boy'. You can probably download this from Napster too (in fact I did). Not to all tastes, but probably worth a listen for all those electronic percussion sounds.


                            [This message has been edited by DJourg (edited May 27, 2001).]

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                            • #15
                              Amon Tobin is pretty interesting too but I guess he's more kind of Drum and Bass using sampled loops. Still that's a type of electronica that us drummers might like to get into (and some do).
                              You might like to check out Lamb too. Their album Fear of Fours is worth a listen. I think only about two or three of the songs are in 4/4.
                              szvook, I'm with Schmunk, I'd love to hear some of your stuff. Any chance of that?

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