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Will VDrums take a good pounding?

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  • Will VDrums take a good pounding?

    I have recently played the new V-Session Set and loved them. I currently play acoustic drums and do not have e-drums. I play hard at times and want to know if the vdrums will take a good pounding at times. My thought is to replace my acoustic set with the session set for live shows as well. Any thoughts?
    Start Young, Play Hard, Rock On!!!

  • #2
    I've had my V-Drums for about 2 years and the rubber rims are starting to crack pretty badly. Then again, I'm nuts!

    Keep the heads well tuned, though, and the drums themselves should be fine. That'll help you to not whack the sensors.

    If anybody has advice on replacing the rubber rims, I'm all ears.

    best,
    FBC
    Auxiliary Mongol
    BENTMEN http://www.bentmen.com

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    • #3
      Frank, I had the same question about the rims. They say you can get them from Roland's customer service; but I have nott tried Roland yet to know for sure. http://www.vdrums.com/discussion/For...ML/000531.html
      http://www.vdrums.com/discussion/For...ML/000459.html

      well since my links did not seem to work, the only other bit of info on the links was that they were believed to cost only $20.00
      Rob


      [This message has been edited by Zigs (edited April 30, 2001).]

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      • #4
        You have to get the rims from Roland direct. The rubber is permanately attached to the 10" and 12" rims and the rim with trim sells for around $20. The 8" rubber comes off the rim so I assume you oly have to buy the rubber for the 8's. Just call customer service and have your credit card ready. They ship within a week.

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        • #5
          COuldn't you just order some more of the 8" rim rubbers, and put them on the PD100/120 rims? (After removing the original). An extra cut or 2 won't matter, as only one side of the rim is usualyy hit anyway. Or are the rims that different? Another option is to get small rubber tubing and slit it, then slip it over the rim. Use 2 layers (a larger diameter over the smaller) for better cushioning.

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          • #6
            The problem, from what I understand about replacing the rims, according to the clinic, anyway, is that the 10" and 12" pads' rims are actually DIPPED in this rubber and molded this way...it is not a "seperate" part, like it is on the 8" versions. That's why the new Rim.

            You guys must play WAY different than I do...I have had mine for almost 3 years, played out with them pretty often...and I have not had to replace a head, rim, or clamp, and I had a "bar brawl" pass right through the whole kit about 2 weeks after I got it, which bent the stand slightly, but did not damage anything else at all.

            Maybe I should just count my blessings.
            My Updated Website: https://blades.technology

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            • #7
              Originally posted by fredinator:
              I currently play acoustic drums and do not have e-drums. I play hard at times and want to know if the vdrums will take a good pounding ...
              Fred,

              I play hard too... I was worried about the durability of the Vs under the pounding I give as well... What I've found is that after spending $X,000.00 on them, I had a desire to "lighten up" when I hit them... So I decided to set my Vs up (sensitivity settings, etc.) so I don't HAVE to hit them hard...

              I've also switched to smaller sticks since I don't worry about breaking them anymore. Smaller sticks = less of a pounding for my Vs and more speed and quickness for me!

              The problem is curbing that live-playing energy... and I still wanna put on a good show when I play (large movements that people can watch).

              Point is, unless you are crazy, you too will most likely develop a desire to preserve your investment and alter your playing style on the Vs... bottom line: these aren't real drums... but they're darn close.

              ------------------
              \oo/_ _\oo/

              [This message has been edited by rus (edited April 30, 2001).]
              \oo/_ :mad: _\oo/

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              • #8
                Thanks everyone for the reply. I certainly want to run out and bring home a V-Session Set as I write. All I have to do is come up with five grand. Anybody want to buy a car?


                Hey, maybe you can answer me this. Are e-drums (v-drums) like computers, wait a year and the price will drop? Or, are they pretty stable from where they start?

                PS. START YOUNG, PLAY HARD, and ROCK ON!!!
                Start Young, Play Hard, Rock On!!!

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                • #9
                  Start off high, drop a little bit, but not much, and stay pretty stable until discontinued.

                  Stu
                  "Fry that sound effect, Moriarty, we're having it for breakfast"

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                  • #10
                    >> The problem, from what I understand about replacing the rims, according to the clinic, anyway, is that the 10" and 12" pads' rims are actually DIPPED in this rubber and molded this way<<

                    That's exactly my problem, I have 10s & 12s. How does one go about replacing the molded rims? Is it even possible?

                    TIA,
                    FBC
                    http://www.bentmen.com

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Frank Coleman:
                      [B]How does one go about replacing the molded rims? Is it even possible?[B]
                      Frank, see cliff's post above.

                      -----------------------
                      -~

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                      • #12
                        Maybe you could eat the rubber off with some sort of solvent, and replace it with something like Tool Dip. Or just try tool dip over the old rubber. If you need a new rim anyway, it can't hurt to try.

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