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Have you ever been turned down by bands due to your Ekit?

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  • Have you ever been turned down by bands due to your Ekit?

    I was just wondering if many have had this experience. You know, being dropped once the group figured out your kit was not acoustic.

    I do not play with a band at the moment (moving thousands in gear is just not in the cards presently) but wonder just how many are interested in the modern "E Drummer."

    Just curious...



    Kelly Mercer
    Halifax, Nova Scotia
    Canada

    My Youtube Channel!
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  • #2
    Actually just the opposite. I have played more live inthe last two years BECAUSE of my VDrums.

    Everyone is amazed at how good they sound, and how there is volume control!!

    And as my outgear collection grows (thanks szvook), it only keeps getting better.
    Driving a great song is better than driving a great car!!

    http://mysite.verizon.net/landin82/

    Comment


    • #3
      Never been turned down, but been paranoyd about it happening.

      The other day I saw an ad for a "show ready metal band - influences are early Metalica & Iron Maiden"

      My guess is these guys wouldn't appreciate the V-drums.

      ------------------
      Reverend Poppy
      Reverend Poppy

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      • #4
        Although I play techno only (and will always) I have had a lot of rock/metal guys come up to me after our sets and ask if I would be interested to work with other music styles. I guess a few distortion guitar loops that I trigger at times while playing on top of them, have gotten numerous heads turned. Just about all of the rock/metal musicians that I spoke to, could easily see them self’s using edrums for their music. But most of them liked the fact that I had outboard effects that made my TD-8 sound strong enough to use with for any music style.

        I had one guy basically on my shoulder the entire 2 hours while we did a sound check in New York about a year ago. He was from a local metal band and was interested in using edrums for their band, but their drummer wanted no part of it – he felt that learning to drum is a quest in it’s self, but to learn how to work with a module would be impractical to him. Needless to say the bass player liked the TD-8 sounds and he could foresee using edrums. He even got behind my set up and jammed for a while after our sound check was done – I have never seen a rock/metal guy smile so much afterwards.


        ------------------
        szvook

        [This message has been edited by szvook (edited April 03, 2001).]

        [This message has been edited by szvook (edited April 03, 2001).]
        Studio

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        • #5
          As mentioned in another thread, I've lost gigs due to bands thinking electronics=Synare-piuuu-piuuu sounds. But then again I've lost gigs due to the fact that they wanted an American drummer, and I'm English. Their problem.
          I've also gotten gigs because I have the electronics, so I've experienced both sides of the coin, both the "Electronics? There's the door" and the "Electronics? Cool!" situations. Currently I'm playing Goth-Industrial, well not currently, I've been doing it for the last decade, and the first thing most bands in that scene will ask is: "Got Electronics?"
          Stu
          "Fry that sound effect, Moriarty, we're having it for breakfast"

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          • #6
            I'm more valued as a drummer with e Drums. As soon as my old band mates heard I was building a new E kit after being out of the lime light for over 10 years, they started calling. In the old days, one of the kits used was a Roland TR-505, Simmonds pads, TMI midi interface, (used an acoustic snare Priemere project 2001), sound checks took no time at all. Lately, three different working bands approached me in one month asking if I would play with them. In my circle, drummers with E Drums are much more prefered. Low stage volume, faster sound checks, killer sound, what's not to like? I'm not knocking acoustic drums at all, but they are considered noisy by some, (non drummers). Acoustics are good to be used to record samples for E Drums. (Watch the flames come in now heh). Bottom line, e drums all the way!!!!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Zorro:
              Acoustics are good to be used to record samples for E Drums. (Watch the flames come in now heh).
              You go girl, um, boy, um.... I can't pull that off.... ;-)
              "Fry that sound effect, Moriarty, we're having it for breakfast"

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              • #8
                When it comes to educating the masses (and other musicians) on the merits of electronic drums, sometimes the direct approach is best. I recall an outdoor show I did using my old D-4/TMX setup where this guy walked by my riser as I was checking the signals on my individual pads. He said, "What are those, toy drums?" Well, to me that was just as insulting as making a pass at my girlfriend, so I decided that this scoundrel should suffer the consequences! I quickly switched my kit over to the one I used for the last song in our set, which featured a heavily processed and extremely loud explosion sound triggered from my kit. Needless to say, I hit the pad in question with relish (and mustard, too). BLAM! Made him jump so badly that he spilled his beer. Toy drum that, buddy.....
                TD-30 / SPD-SX

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                • #9
                  GO MICK! GO MICK! GO MICK!
                  Music was my first love...

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                  • #10
                    No.


                    a. I do what I want. I always do as long as my sound is concerned. When everyone played a 6, 8 or 10-inch deep snare, i liked the shallow ones. When everybody had a card box sound, I played the open sounding roto toms. I was one of the first 'fools' to play a Simmons, used an Octapad for playing keyboards et cetera.
                    b. Do I kick out guitar players because they play electric instruments and don't sound acoustic as well? Don't think so...
                    c. I found the band in which I play with my guitar player. All the other members came later and have to accept who we are, what we do and how we sound.
                    d. My e-drums don't sound electronic. They did with the Simmons (in a way), but now they don't
                    Robert

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                    • #11
                      Simmons users are not, nor have been ever labeled as "fools" - just ahead of their time.

                      ------------------
                      szvook
                      Studio

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                      • #12
                        This was not a problem to me...
                        I was told NOT to use electric drums for my youngest bro's wedding, so I brought my acoustic. For my own and my second bro's wedding, I brought my electric.

                        (Unless we can't find an acoustic drum to play?)

                        Fon.

                        TD8 with PD7's, 2 KD7's (From previous TD7)
                        Tama Rockstar with mix of Sabian, Zildjian and Paiste.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by szvook:
                          Simmons users are not, nor have been ever labeled as "fools" - just ahead of their time.

                          That's true, all ex-Simmons users unite! Them things were cool, although my carpal tunnels scream at the thought of those pads.

                          Stu, former owner of Simmons SDS7, SDS8, SDS9, SDX, MTM, plus Dynacord ADD One and ADD Drive - can anybody tell me why I gave all that gear away?
                          "Fry that sound effect, Moriarty, we're having it for breakfast"

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                          • #14
                            Should have kept the Simmons. The addition they make to the V-drums is perfect. The sounds they can produce are unique, very powerful and very affective when tweaked right.

                            The pads are a bit tough to use on a regular basis, the impact was felt by a lot of drummers physically.

                            Although I use most of my SDS-7 pads inputs with Hart Series-X Acupads and they work perfectly, so can bang them like the rest. I do keep two of the black octagon Simmons pads in my set up as well for originality and for light work in between chops or rolls.

                            To use the Simmons module with Hart pads is a great way to incorporate the new pad technology and use the Simmons without killing your body. The pads will work fine as long as they are wired correctly to the XLR inputs on the SDS-7; Pin 1 is ground (1/4" plug sleeve) pin 2 is hot (1/4" plug tip).

                            Live, through a good-strong PA, this monster can rip your head off. The analog filter sweeps can really give a punch to the sounds.


                            I don’t leave home without them.



                            ------------------
                            szvook
                            Studio

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by szvook:
                              Should have kept the Simmons. The addition they make to the V-drums is perfect. The sounds they can produce are unique, very powerful and very affective when tweaked right.


                              The pads are a bit tough to use on a regular basis, the impact was felt by a lot of drummers physically.


                              Although I use most of my SDS-7 pads inputs with Hart Series-X Acupads and they work perfectly, so can bang them like the rest. I do keep two of the black octagon Simmons pads in my set up as well for originality and for light work in between chops or rolls.


                              To use the Simmons module with Hart pads is a great way to incorporate the new pad technology and use the Simmons without killing your body. The pads will work fine as long as they are wired correctly to the XLR inputs on the SDS-7; Pin 1 is ground (1/4" plug sleeve) pin 2 is hot (1/4" plug tip).


                              Live, through a good-strong PA, this monster can rip your head off. The analog filter sweeps can really give a punch to the sounds.

                              I don?t leave home without them.



                              The Dynacord wasn't a bad box either.
                              I've been using Simmons samples for a while, but Ebay beware, I'm going to be looking for an SDS 7 or 9 pretty soon, and not only for nostalgic reasons.

                              Stu

                              "Fry that sound effect, Moriarty, we're having it for breakfast"

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