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Playing live with TD10\v-drum pro

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  • Playing live with TD10\v-drum pro

    I havent played live yet with the TD10/v-drums yet, and would like to know if anyone has any tips/tricks, or problems regarding playing live. Up till know I've playing standard Pearl 5 piece kits, usually without mic's. What can I expect? What was the respone from other band members or the club/pub crowd. I know this is a bit of a stupid general question, but would be gratefull for any input.

  • #2
    You must remember that usually acoustic drums are loud. The art is of course to be sensitive and not play to their full potential volume.

    So, for the V's you need to set the volume pretty high. By doing this you are not losing your 'acoustic' ability to be sensitive and play softly.

    I was told to raise the volume of my V's when first playing live as I had a false sense of the volume. Speakers by my side sound great... but for the rest of the hall? A little muffled and quiet.

    Added a bit of external EQ and put the volume up.

    One last thing, try not to rely on the volume knob to make yourself quieter - use your ability.

    Just a thought!

    Happy V-ing!

    Sincerely,

    Joe Wakeford - www.halfpennystudios.com

    [This message has been edited by Joe Wakeford (edited January 22, 2001).]

    Comment


    • #3
      About the response from other band members. Well, they were sceptic at fist. They translated e-drums with the synthetic sounds from the Simmons SDS V. Especially when I had a Simmons once.
      But after some time the guys become habituated with my e-drums realizing that they just sound great. And realizing they play electronic or electric instruments theirselves (use this as an argument)

      The audience? They don't care at all which instrument you play. They even don't care how the drums look like. If it is a birch set or maple, pink or purple. They don't care. Only drummers care (and make a problem of it). If the band plays some nice songs then it's okay.


      About the sound system: take a powerful sound system. You don't need this power for playing loud (please, Joe Wakeford be careful with your ears ) but for a clean signal. E-drums have tons of low and mid frequencies as well as many trancients (tones without a real frequency like snare buzzing, the attack from the drumstick on the drumhead or a kick). The number of watts is not important. The decibels (dBa), measured at one metre is. This is called the output. I have a 130 watt drum monitor myself and it is very loud. Loud enough for practice room and small cafes. For large clubs we run the e-drums right into the front of house mixer from the Public Address. Again, some enough power is more important than volume.
      Robert

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      • #4
        Puttenvr - I wasn't saying turn the volume up and use it... but perhaps use your rimshot as a guide. Strike the snare and match it to your acoustic kit sound at that level.

        Therefore you can now play softly and the volume will be the same (probably) as your acoustics.

        Oooh, nooo, don't play loudly. People will shout at you!

        Sincerely,

        Joe Wakeford - www.halfpennystudios.com

        [This message has been edited by Joe Wakeford (edited January 22, 2001).]

        Comment


        • #5
          Try to get in a dress rehearsal using the PA if at all possible to see if you are satisfied with how well you can hear yourself. By doing this you may find that you want to adjust EQ levels differently than you may have for practice at home, especially if you've been using headphones. Make or puchase some spare cables if you haven't already. Arrive early if possible and get a good sound check. Relax, have fun. Tell us how it went.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by bobv:
            What can I expect?
            Bob, there are no stupid questions... just stupid people Seriously though... You can expect your Vs to perform admirably against the kind of drums you state will be there, and yours will most likely sound much clearer.

            The best advice I can give is just an echo of another post: Try to get your sounds tweaked using a PA because it changes drastically when compared to headphones.

            ------------------
            \oo/_ _\oo/

            [This message has been edited by rus (edited January 22, 2001).]
            \oo/_ :mad: _\oo/

            Comment


            • #7
              This probably the one occasion where the sequencer is great.
              Do a sound check with the rest of the band and record what you play on the V`s on the onboard sequencer (make sure the quantize is off then you wont have to worry about the tempo setting).
              Now go and sit at the bar and get the band to play along to the recorded sequence.
              You will then have a rough idea of the sound of the v`s with the rest of the band.

              Comment


              • #8
                Hey Rus (et al.), Just a quickie . . .

                RE: the sounds sounding drastically different from headphones to PA - is it just the mix levels that need to be altered, or the actual composition of the sounds?

                I have a PM3 for playing at home that I will use as a monitor (Not a PA!) when I eventually play out. The sound that I get through this is different to the Sony Md7505's that I use, so I tweak between the two. Will I have to perform yet more tweaking from the PM3 to a PA, or should the sound I get from the PM3 be quite indicative of the sound that I might get through a PA.

                Oops, sorry - I said that this would be a quickie! I've gone a long war around asking this one, but I hope this post makes some sense!

                Andy
                Andy
                TD-20, Pair of JBL-Eon15 G2's & Sub

                Check out the demo tracks to hear my V's at

                http://www.thebrokenangelband.co.uk/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Anyone with a PM3 and some PA experience wanna help this guy out? I've not heard the pm3, so I can't say what sort of difference there would be twixt it and a big high powered PA

                  ------------------
                  \oo/_ _\oo/

                  [This message has been edited by rus (edited January 22, 2001).]
                  \oo/_ :mad: _\oo/

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by e-drummer:
                    This probably the one occasion where the sequencer is great.

                    It's important that e-drummer says "record a part and play this part back on your sequencer". You namely can't use a factory sequencer pattern for a sound check since since the sequencer uses more clear trigger signals than any drum pad will do. You then will miss the dynamics and positional sensing from a real drummer here.
                    Robert

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