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Can you believe how much money you spent so far on this?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by TangTheHump View Post
    EssKayKay,



    Oh, I totally get the need for quiet drumming! I've had home studios where I could practice acoustic drums, but other times, due to moving and downsizing, this was out of the question.

    I'm not a purest. I've lugged Rhodes pianos, Hammond organs, and classic analog synthesizers around, but not anymore, because current day emulations are affordable, lightweight, reliable, satisfying to play, and (reasonably) sonically indistinguishable.
    Yea I relate to that mate. We once auditioned a guy with a Hammond Organ and Leslie. Getting it out of his house and up a flight of stairs to the practice room and back again, well, needless to say, we only did it the once

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    • #17
      Eh, I haven't spent much on this, maybe 350 dollars or so in lessons over the past year? But then, when I'll get my drums set, that number might explode...

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      • #18
        Originally posted by TangTheHump View Post
        I guess I'm still a dissenter in the edrum world. To date, I've spent around $15,000 USD equivalent on flagship level edrums, and I was set to spend another (approximately) $6,000 USD equivalent on upgrades. Instead, I put all my edrum purchasing on hold and decided to watch how newer technology performed and matured. That, for me, has turned out to be one of my better decisions.

        Edrums have never delivered the immediacy and range of expressiveness I want from an instrument, and try as I might to work with the technology and expand its limits, edrums haven't lived up to what I want to express. After a long time away from acoustic drums, I set up one of my acoustic kits and gave it a play. What an astronomical world of difference! Just tuning up an acoustic snare drum and playing some rhythms with brushes - wow, I'd swap every electronic drum I own for the level of expressiveness I get from that one, acoustic snare drum.

        Another acoustic drum benefit I forgot is... the snare I'm speaking of is an inexpensive, $200 drum. Its sound is world class. Its performance is world class. I can own and use this drum for the rest of my life; the drum will NEVER be obsolete. So yes, I'm rediscovering acoustic drums, and let me say, by comparison, the newest flagship edrums still have a long, long way to mature. I find the edrums I own extremely useful for practice and teaching, but as an instrument for expressing my music and musical ideas, no thank you.
        Hi Tang, there are several guys here that would agree with you, and so would I. If I was still gigging it would be with Adrums, mainly cause I know where I am with them, but for playing at home and for being able to play along with what ever I want, at what ever volume I want, and with the versatility of changing sounds, it has got to be Edrums.

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        • #19
          At least I haven't spent as much as my wife thinks I have. If she only knew how wrong she is.
          Lets just keep that our little secret in this lifetime.
          It's been worth it at twice the cost. It's the fun factor X3 divided by the I want / need quotient minus the secret from her value that is important to remember.

          I think. LOL
          "It makes sense if you dont think about it"

          Mimic Pro, SPD-SX, 2-QSC K-10s, K-sub, Yamaha mixer, and a bunch of other expensive cool things!

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          • #20
            John.b,

            John.b wrote:
            Hi Tang, there are several guys here that would agree with you, and so would I. If I was still gigging, it would be with Adrums, mainly cause I know where I am with them, but for playing at home and for being able to play along with whatever I want, at whatever volume I want, and with the versatility of changing sounds, it has got to be Edrums.
            I'm in the same boat as you, but I also continue gigging and teaching. After home downsizing, I now require quiet drum practice due to neighbors. I had hoped edrums would open new avenues of musical expression, but for me, as noted already, this hasn't panned out to date. It always seems so little (if any) of the expressive nuance I play comes out of the module, and that's incredibly uninspiring and limiting. The flip side is getting consistent performance from edrums requires great stroke accuracy, much more so than with acoustic drums, and this is useful for improving stroke accuracy.

            Edrums are maturing and I'm really looking forward to when they graduate from engineering problems to organic, eminently playable, expressive, musical instruments. Alas, I'm beginning to wonder if I'll live to see that day. It's a morbid thought, perhaps, but a realistic one given the slow, expensive development path.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by TangTheHump View Post
              John.b,



              I'm in the same boat as you, but I also continue gigging and teaching. After home downsizing, I now require quiet drum practice due to neighbors. I had hoped edrums would open new avenues of musical expression, but for me, as noted already, this hasn't panned out to date. It always seems so little (if any) of the expressive nuance I play comes out of the module, and that's incredibly uninspiring and limiting. The flip side is getting consistent performance from edrums requires great stroke accuracy, much more so than with acoustic drums, and this is useful for improving stroke accuracy.

              Edrums are maturing and I'm really looking forward to when they graduate from engineering problems to organic, eminently playable, expressive, musical instruments. Alas, I'm beginning to wonder if I'll live to see that day. It's a morbid thought, perhaps, but a realistic one given the slow, expensive development path.
              Yea whether rim shotting the snare or just a cross stick onto the rim, E's never did it for me, no matter what sensitivity I set.
              Last edited by John.b; 08-07-20, 02:47 PM.

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              • #22
                I'm in $2100 (actual outlay to get edrum setup going was $1300 because I already had the laptop, audio interface, Superior Drummmer and was given the drum kit). The kit plays extremely well:

                My orginal goal to get from drum programming to edrumming was $1000 so I feel like I've remained in the ball park.
                Item Cost
                eDRUMin ED10 $300
                UFOdrums Mesh Heads $252
                UFOdrums Trigger Assemblies $348
                Yamaha PCY135 $130
                Yamaha PCY155 $150
                Used Ludwig Accent Combo 5 Piece $350
                Used Lenovo 16GB i5-3360 laptop $200
                Mryk chokes $24
                Pintech Crashes $45
                Goedrums Piezos $10
                Polycase $10
                Behringer UMC202HD Audio Interface $99
                Rockville 10' TRS 10 units $50
                Pyle laptop stand $30
                Superior Drummer 2.0 $99
                Total $2,097

                Ludwig Accent 5 piece kit | UFO Drums ebridges, 3 ply mesh heads and rim protectors | Yamaha PCY135 on Ludwig stand with DIY hall effect sensor | Yamaha PCY155 ride | DIY Pintech 2 zone crashes with Goedrums piezo's - Myrk membranes| eDRUMin(s) | Cantabile VST host | Superior Drummer 2 and Jamstix kits | Alto TS115a monitors | IK ARC 3

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                • #23
                  are you using myrk choke strips on pintech cymbals? what did you cover the myrk switches with on them if so?
                  Alesis STRIKE, PD-85 rack toms, PD-105BK floor tom, Mapex snare with ISM-6, PDP MX 22" kick with ISM, iron cobra 900 double pedal, hart e-cymbal2, CY-5 as splash, CY-8, CY-12R, L80 hi-hat with cheap-o trigger with goedrum hi hat controller. EZdrummer2+EZX/Addictive Drums 2 VSTs.

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                  • #24
                    Yes, just 1/4 of the cymbal circumference membrane strips for the Pintech 16" cymbals. So far I have just put gaffer's tape over them. Adam, who makes the membranes, says eva foam will increase the touch area and make the membranes more sensitive. They choke pretty well as is so I haven't' started that project yet. The membranes are 1/2 inch in on the underside of the Pintech cymbal. I'm not using them for an edge articulation but the eDRUMin appears to be able to do that if I want to go that route. The gaffer's tape did increase the choke reliability. For the crash articulation I mounted goedrums 27mm piezos with 3M double sided clear tape onto the under side of the cymbal, then a layer of mouse pad material and then the Polycase project box the jack is mounted to.
                    Last edited by dsteinschneider; 08-07-20, 04:51 PM.
                    Ludwig Accent 5 piece kit | UFO Drums ebridges, 3 ply mesh heads and rim protectors | Yamaha PCY135 on Ludwig stand with DIY hall effect sensor | Yamaha PCY155 ride | DIY Pintech 2 zone crashes with Goedrums piezo's - Myrk membranes| eDRUMin(s) | Cantabile VST host | Superior Drummer 2 and Jamstix kits | Alto TS115a monitors | IK ARC 3

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by EssKayKay View Post

                      You know Tang everything you say is probably 100% accurate. I truly wish I had that option, but I don't. The sound volume level is out of the question. So it's eDrum for me.
                      If sound level and money compared to edrums is the issue, I put rtom black holes and Zildjian L80 low volumes on my acoustic kit and think it's more realistic. I have an overhead and bass drum mic and it's great. Now, I already had the acoustic, mixer, and mic so you have to take that into consideration $$.
                      Yamaha DTX502 module, mapex piccolo snare, 10" and 12" vintage Tama Superstar toms, 16" no name blue sparkle floor tom (from my first kit in 1979 resurrected from the attic) Triggera Intriggs on snare and two mounted toms, Roland RT-10 on floor tom, two Kriggs, Yamaha RH135, pcy135, and pcy155

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by merpmerp View Post

                        If sound level and money compared to edrums is the issue, I put rtom black holes and Zildjian L80 low volumes on my acoustic kit and think it's more realistic. I have an overhead and bass drum mic and it's great. Now, I already had the acoustic, mixer, and mic so you have to take that into consideration $$.
                        i'm waiting to see when those half mesh half acoustic drum heads from NAMM hit the market. those things are ****ing cool.
                        Alesis STRIKE, PD-85 rack toms, PD-105BK floor tom, Mapex snare with ISM-6, PDP MX 22" kick with ISM, iron cobra 900 double pedal, hart e-cymbal2, CY-5 as splash, CY-8, CY-12R, L80 hi-hat with cheap-o trigger with goedrum hi hat controller. EZdrummer2+EZX/Addictive Drums 2 VSTs.

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                        • #27
                          I live in an apartment. Acoustic drums are out of the question (although in the Before Days, I would occasional rent the drum room in the local rehearsal for $10/hr but that's not an option right now.)
                          So it's been e-drums for the past 12 years, and I'm still enjoying it. Everyone's approach is different, but I get a kick out of trying to make my setup sound, and play, as acoustically "real" as possible. So yeah, endlessly tweaking curves, trying different VSTs, different pads, that sort of stuff. And now with stuf like Superior Drummer 3, eDrumIn, it's getting close enough that I feel we're getting somewhere. Again, I know it will never be the same as an acoustic, but to me it's this little quest I'm on and I'm having fun trying to play my pads and make them respond as natural as the technology allows.

                          (I've been eying A to E kits too, but you know, apartment: no space for full size drums.)
                          Module: TD-9v2. Kick: KD-8, pedal: Iron Cobra with KAT Silent Strike beater. Hats: VH-10 with Tama Swivel hi-hat stand. Snare: PD-120. Toms: 3 x PD-80R. Crashes: CY-12RC, CY-14. Ride: CY-15R. Aux: BT-1.

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                          • #28
                            half acoustic drum heads ? i have to go searching for those.. but about 'cost' of things.. i always say "hobbies cost money"
                            unless you are a pro musician, then you can 'make' money with it.. (and the lucky ones, find succesful projects..)
                            but how does playing those drums make you feel ? to me it's more important than my day job .. so, money is not an issue ..

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                            • #29
                              2015 investment

                              Last edited by Bosko; 08-08-20, 06:48 AM.
                              Roland TD30Kv.....6 cymbals..DW9000 double pedal...DW9000 Hi Hat stand/snare stand

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                              • #30
                                I don’t like to think about it, but if I include everything that’s used exclusively in my drumming world (i.e., table/stand, computer, mixers, drum rug, etc.) - nearly $10K. . . .

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