Announcement

Collapse

Lounge Posting Guidelines

E-DRUMMING DISCUSSION ONLY! DO NOT POST PRODUCT OR TECHNICAL QUESTIONS!

Having issues? Please visit our Forum Talk section for answers to frequently asked questions.

See more
See less

Can you believe how much money you spent so far on this?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by TangTheHump View Post
    EssKayKay,



    Oh, I totally get the need for quiet drumming! I've had home studios where I could practice acoustic drums, but other times, due to moving and downsizing, this was out of the question.

    I'm not a purest. I've lugged Rhodes pianos, Hammond organs, and classic analog synthesizers around, but not anymore, because current day emulations are affordable, lightweight, reliable, satisfying to play, and (reasonably) sonically indistinguishable.
    Yea I relate to that mate. We once auditioned a guy with a Hammond Organ and Leslie. Getting it out of his house and up a flight of stairs to the practice room and back again, well, needless to say, we only did it the once

    Comment


    • #17
      Eh, I haven't spent much on this, maybe 350 dollars or so in lessons over the past year? But then, when I'll get my drums set, that number might explode...

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by TangTheHump View Post
        I guess I'm still a dissenter in the edrum world. To date, I've spent around $15,000 USD equivalent on flagship level edrums, and I was set to spend another (approximately) $6,000 USD equivalent on upgrades. Instead, I put all my edrum purchasing on hold and decided to watch how newer technology performed and matured. That, for me, has turned out to be one of my better decisions.

        Edrums have never delivered the immediacy and range of expressiveness I want from an instrument, and try as I might to work with the technology and expand its limits, edrums haven't lived up to what I want to express. After a long time away from acoustic drums, I set up one of my acoustic kits and gave it a play. What an astronomical world of difference! Just tuning up an acoustic snare drum and playing some rhythms with brushes - wow, I'd swap every electronic drum I own for the level of expressiveness I get from that one, acoustic snare drum.

        Another acoustic drum benefit I forgot is... the snare I'm speaking of is an inexpensive, $200 drum. Its sound is world class. Its performance is world class. I can own and use this drum for the rest of my life; the drum will NEVER be obsolete. So yes, I'm rediscovering acoustic drums, and let me say, by comparison, the newest flagship edrums still have a long, long way to mature. I find the edrums I own extremely useful for practice and teaching, but as an instrument for expressing my music and musical ideas, no thank you.
        Hi Tang, there are several guys here that would agree with you, and so would I. If I was still gigging it would be with Adrums, mainly cause I know where I am with them, but for playing at home and for being able to play along with what ever I want, at what ever volume I want, and with the versatility of changing sounds, it has got to be Edrums.

        Comment


        • #19
          At least I haven't spent as much as my wife thinks I have. If she only knew how wrong she is.
          Lets just keep that our little secret in this lifetime.
          It's been worth it at twice the cost. It's the fun factor X3 divided by the I want / need quotient minus the secret from her value that is important to remember.

          I think. LOL
          "It makes sense if you dont think about it"

          Mimic Pro, SPD-SX, 2-QSC K-10s, K-sub, Yamaha mixer, and a bunch of other expensive cool things!

          Comment


          • #20
            John.b,

            John.b wrote:
            Hi Tang, there are several guys here that would agree with you, and so would I. If I was still gigging, it would be with Adrums, mainly cause I know where I am with them, but for playing at home and for being able to play along with whatever I want, at whatever volume I want, and with the versatility of changing sounds, it has got to be Edrums.
            I'm in the same boat as you, but I also continue gigging and teaching. After home downsizing, I now require quiet drum practice due to neighbors. I had hoped edrums would open new avenues of musical expression, but for me, as noted already, this hasn't panned out to date. It always seems so little (if any) of the expressive nuance I play comes out of the module, and that's incredibly uninspiring and limiting. The flip side is getting consistent performance from edrums requires great stroke accuracy, much more so than with acoustic drums, and this is useful for improving stroke accuracy.

            Edrums are maturing and I'm really looking forward to when they graduate from engineering problems to organic, eminently playable, expressive, musical instruments. Alas, I'm beginning to wonder if I'll live to see that day. It's a morbid thought, perhaps, but a realistic one given the slow, expensive development path.

            Comment

            Working...
            X