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Can you believe how much money you spent so far on this?

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  • Can you believe how much money you spent so far on this?

    Almost a year ago i started exploring this whole eDrumming thing. And if you told me then how much i wound up spending I would say "no way in hell".

    A little back story have not been able to play drums for a long time due to living situation, so knew I wanted an Ekit. And looking at the nice ones was like 7k or more, and thought no way i can afford that or willing to pay that much!

    Then i came across Alesis Strike Pro about a year ago. Watched all the videos for how great it was and that price, I actually drove to Kraft music since it's in my town, thinking they had a show room. They do not but did have a nice TD-50 set up for 5k that they nicely let me try, and WOW I liked it but out of my range. But that Alesis really got me really thinking seriously about going forward with this.

    If they would have came down by $100 more bucks I would have bought that Alesis Strike Pro then and there. Turns out they did me a huge favor. I did more research and realized all those videos i watched were all just promos tried out the Alesis Strike pro SE at guitar center (no offense but really just felt like an expensive toy), and decided i should probably spend a little more money. Even though at that time I thought wow $1,700-2,500 is a lot of money! It is but nothing compared to what was to come.

    i wound up ordering a Custom kit from Jobeky that i love, and bought everything else a little at a time. tried not to think about the end price much other than looking for great deals at the time, but still, Holy cow that really adds up. And Now plan on upgrading more now from my td-25 (which i have dialed in to some really great kits) to the TD-50 upgrade pack. that digital snare and ride and expanded ports are calling to me. also love the Vexpression stuff to boot.

    i know obviously this can be done for much less, for those that just want to practice or just for home fun. But really wanted a kit I can gig with and be proud of, trust, and wow some folks. And hopefully record with as well.

    After this is all said and done, this is going to be a hell of an investment. that make the original prices I scoffed at look like a great deal, and really am ending up in that 7k+ ball park after all. But I got a tell you I could not be happier with what i got, and plenty grateful.I am really building my Dream kit, and the capability of today's modules and VST are just amazing, and still getting better.

    Also grateful for the community here on vdrums.com lots of great advice on here, with a dash on snark.

    so how about you guys? did you expect to spend this much going in, and going forward?
    Last edited by A-Baum; 07-21-20, 03:07 PM.

  • #2
    I began my foray into edrums back in the spring of 1985 when I purchased a Pearl DRX-1 kit for $1200. By today's standards that kit seems so antiquated, with no digital sounds, no cymbals, no percussion sounds, etc. You were basically limited to the 80's drum synth sounds that were popular at that time, but nothing more. At least it allowed me to play in my apartment even though the rubber pads were somewhat noisy. I then replaced the module, upgrading to an Alesis D4 for a little over $300. This was a big improvement because it had digital samples and a wide variety of drum, percussion, and cymbal sounds. The cymbal sounds, however, were not usable because of their short decay. The hi-hat was also very limited. Next, I replaced the D4 with a Roland TD-12 module ($1100), which was light years ahead of what I had been using. I added some Roland pads, piece by piece, cobbling together a fairly decent kit for home practice for a few hundred dollars more. However, there were still several shortcomings, especially in terms of dynamics, machine gunning, and ride cymbal response. I knew that if I wanted to progress to a better kit, I was going to have to shell out some big bucks. I just couldn't justify spending $4000 or more on an e-kit so I went back to acoustics altogether. Fortunately, my Roland gear had some decent resale value and sold quickly, but I doubt I will go back to edrums anytime soon given the price I would have to pay for a kit that meets my needs and expectations.
    Roland TD-12, Pearl DRX-1 tom and snare pads, Roland PD-8 pads for cymbals, DW pedals and stands, Pearl and Gibraltar hardware

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    • #3
      also spent lots.. and i only started electronic drums when i couldn't practice acoustic drums anymore ..(out of band/ practice space)
      then i was on a music fair, and they had a roland td-20 ..i put up the headphones and 'holy cow' it's just like drums in a studio ..
      and then the gas started with the tdw-20 /vh-12.. etc.. then bigger toms/ kick.. more crashes.. better snare.. you know the deal ..
      then the pc /mobo/ memory/ hdd /sound card/ vst upgrades .. i'm probably at 10 K.. ..but.. was it worth the 'investment' ?
      well, i would never have had the practice time and drum 'sound' options that i had .. if it was not for electronic drums ..
      Audio | Video | Roland/Yamaha e-kit | Sonor/Gretsch a-kit | Zildjian/Sabian/Ufip cymbals

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      • #4
        Spent next-to-nothing.

        Similarly I'd never buy an iPhone
        *** Never buy a module without MIDI IN ***
        Yamaha & Roland modules. DTX,TM-2, EC-10, EC10m, SP-404. Multi12. TrapKat. ControlPads. Octapad, SamplePad, Wavedrum. Handsonic. Dynacord RhythmStick. MPC. Paiste 2002/Signatures. Cajons. Djembes. Darbuka. Windsynth. MIDI Bass. Tenori-on. Zoom ARQ. Synths. Ukes.

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        • #5
          Definitively I spent a lot more than I was expecting, even though I got some good discounts by going second hand on some of the items.
          I have a TD-17 module with an a2e kit. I always have something to buy or to change haha... It is endless.
          I am really happy so far and I still have things to do. I am willing to replace the bass drum pedal and hi-hat stand and buy a couple of LV cymbals (already have one). Then, I will give a break in terms of buying stuff.

          The same happened to an aquarium that I had. You can spend a lot on aquariums too


          No regrets so far and a lot of fun, but I also learned few things in the process and I would do a bit different few things.
          Ronaldo B.

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          • #6
            Some people have ski boats. I have drums!

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            • #7
              I guess I'm still a dissenter in the edrum world. To date, I've spent around $15,000 USD equivalent on flagship level edrums, and I was set to spend another (approximately) $6,000 USD equivalent on upgrades. Instead, I put all my edrum purchasing on hold and decided to watch how newer technology performed and matured. That, for me, has turned out to be one of my better decisions.

              Edrums have never delivered the immediacy and range of expressiveness I want from an instrument, and try as I might to work with the technology and expand its limits, edrums haven't lived up to what I want to express. After a long time away from acoustic drums, I set up one of my acoustic kits and gave it a play. What an astronomical world of difference! Just tuning up an acoustic snare drum and playing some rhythms with brushes - wow, I'd swap every electronic drum I own for the level of expressiveness I get from that one, acoustic snare drum.

              Another acoustic drum benefit I forgot is... the snare I'm speaking of is an inexpensive, $200 drum. Its sound is world class. Its performance is world class. I can own and use this drum for the rest of my life; the drum will NEVER be obsolete. So yes, I'm rediscovering acoustic drums, and let me say, by comparison, the newest flagship edrums still have a long, long way to mature. I find the edrums I own extremely useful for practice and teaching, but as an instrument for expressing my music and musical ideas, no thank you.
              Last edited by TangTheHump; 07-21-20, 10:05 PM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by TangTheHump View Post
                I guess I'm still a dissenter in the edrum world. To date, I've spent around $15,000 USD equivalent on flagship level edrums, and I was set to spend another (approximately) $6,000 USD equivalent on upgrades. Instead, I put all my edrum purchasing on hold and decided to watch how newer technology performed and matured. That, for me, has turned out to be one of my better decisions.

                Edrums have never delivered the immediacy and range of expressiveness I want from an instrument, and try as I might to work with the technology and expand its limits, edrums haven't lived up to what I want to express. After a long time away from acoustic drums, I set up one of my acoustic kits and gave it a play. What an astronomical world of difference! Just tuning up an acoustic snare drum and playing some rhythms with brushes - wow, I'd swap every electronic drum I own for the level of expressiveness I get from that one, acoustic snare drum.

                Another acoustic drum benefit I forgot is... the snare I'm speaking of is an inexpensive, $200 drum. Its sound is world class. Its performance is world class. I can own and use this drum for the rest of my life; the drum will NEVER be obsolete. So yes, I'm rediscovering acoustic drums, and let me say, by comparison, the newest flagship edrums still have a long, long way to mature. I find the edrums I own useful for practice and teaching, but as an instrument for expressing my music and musical ideas, no thank you.
                You know Tang everything you say is probably 100% accurate. I truly wish I had that option, but I don't. The sound volume level is out of the question. So it's eDrum for me.

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                • #9
                  When I think about, yeah... it adds up over time. I started with a TD3, which was cheap enough and it was great... for a couple of months. Didn't like the rubber pads. Got mesh pads. Didn't like the cymbals. Upgraded the cymbals. Got tired of the TD3, got a TD4. Hated the sounds, bought Superior Drummer 2. Didn't like my hi-hat, got a VH-11. Sold the TD4, got a TD9. Wanted rimshots, upgraded to dual zone pads. Upgraded to SD3. And so on and so forth. Kick pedal, throne, headphones, mixer, speakers... Oh yeah, and a Buttkicker too

                  It's true that well-maintained gear doesn't really lose much of its value. I was able to sell and buy stuff on eBay without ever losing crazy amounts of money. But there's no way I would have been able to buy my current setup outright. What I think is nice though is that I now have a kit with components that I have carefully selected over time, that I know inside and out and do exactly what I want them to do. It's pretty awesome.

                  Yeah sure, it doesn't compare to even a cheap-ass acoustic kit. But that was never an option given my living situation.
                  Module: TD-9v2. Kick: KD-8, pedal: Iron Cobra with KAT Silent Strike beater. Hats: VH-10 with Tama Swivel hi-hat stand. Snare: PD-120. Toms: 3 x PD-80R. Crashes: CY-12RC, CY-14. Ride: CY-15R. Aux: BT-1.

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                  • #10
                    A fortune over the years.
                    first Simmons kit back in the 80s which at the time was 1500
                    Roland SPD8
                    Alesis D4 with homemade pads
                    ddrum4 with extra Tom and cymbal about 2200
                    roland handsonic hp15
                    2nd hand td20 kit with faulty vh12 which I fixed 1600
                    2nd hand td30 kit 1750

                    between me and my son we still have the ddrum4 td20 and td30. I wish I had kept the spd8 as great as an extra few pads.
                    Roland TD30 module on TD20 kit SD3 with various kits. Pearl Masters Kit, Yamaha 9000RC original natural wood finish. Cymbals from Zildgian Pasite and Sabian. Loads of percussion bits. Cubase and Wavelab always current versions.

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                    • #11
                      ok, i also counted all music related software .. and all 'upgrades' on PC components (3 audio cards, hdd's/ ssd, memory/mobo changes) to improve
                      vst performance.. (did that several times, due to memory system/ pci bus, sata speed changes etc..) .. anyway, doesn't matter..
                      Audio | Video | Roland/Yamaha e-kit | Sonor/Gretsch a-kit | Zildjian/Sabian/Ufip cymbals

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Ericdrumz View Post
                        ok, i also counted all music related software .. and all 'upgrades' on PC components (3 audio cards, hdd's/ ssd, memory/mobo changes) to improve
                        vst performance.. (did that several times, due to memory system/ pci bus, sata speed changes etc..) .. anyway, doesn't matter..
                        Ha too right. I did t count audio interfaces keyboards guitars and pc upgrades etc. Come to think of it with my acoustic drums as well! Agreed let’s not bother
                        Roland TD30 module on TD20 kit SD3 with various kits. Pearl Masters Kit, Yamaha 9000RC original natural wood finish. Cymbals from Zildgian Pasite and Sabian. Loads of percussion bits. Cubase and Wavelab always current versions.

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                        • #13
                          Thats why it is called a drum kit and not a drum set. A set implys something thats complete, and any drummer will tell you there is always something else they need.

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                          • #14
                            I'd hate to tally the number. More than any car I've ever purchased Recouped a fair amount of it through sales though.
                            ATV aDrums, ATV aD5, eDRUMin, Presonus Quantum 2, SD3

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                            • #15
                              EssKayKay,

                              EssKayKay wrote:
                              You know Tang everything you say is probably 100% accurate. I truly wish I had that option, but I don't. The sound volume level is out of the question. So it's eDrum for me.
                              Oh, I totally get the need for quiet drumming! I've had home studios where I could practice acoustic drums, but other times, due to moving and downsizing, this was out of the question.

                              I'm not a purest. I've lugged Rhodes pianos, Hammond organs, and classic analog synthesizers around, but not anymore, because current day emulations are affordable, lightweight, reliable, satisfying to play, and (reasonably) sonically indistinguishable.

                              Unfortunately, edrums, even with a cost is no object approach, remain unsatisfactory to me. So instead, I continue using edrums for coordination, accuracy, and timing drills (edrums are great for this), and negotiated with a local church for practice time to play acoustic drums. For my own musical needs, spending money to access acoustic drums is a better investment than buying edrum upgrades. And just to acknowledge, each individual has their own needs, so what drives my decisions may not work and/or make sense for others.

                              Edited to add: Those reading my continuing thoughts might think I dislike edrums. Heck no. I'm fascinated by edrums and I think they will become as essential to modern music making as the digital piano has become. However, it has been very frustrating and disappointing watching (and living through) the snail's pace evolution of edrums. Unlike the digital piano (which matured at a steady rate), edrums have been sporadic and just plain stagnant for multiple decades. And even now, at their current rate of development, edrums are still a long, long, long way from maturity.
                              Last edited by TangTheHump; 07-24-20, 09:50 PM.

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