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What does “dual zone” mean to you?

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  • What does “dual zone” mean to you?

    The subject of what dual zone or zone means as come up in a couple of conversations lately and it seems to mean two different things. Which can be confusing to a new user.

    To me a zone is defined simply as one triggering device, be it a piezo or switch or whatever. When I go shopping for triggers or cymbals I see single zone (for example, one piezo), dual zone (for example, some combination of piezo and switch) or triple zone (for example, some combination of piezo and switches).

    But I see people using zone to mean an area of the pad or cymbal that can send a discrete note. So a pad that can send a center and rim is called a dual zone pad.

    I find it confusing to mix the two. I like the first definition because it seems to match what vendors use when describing a pad or cymbal. A Jobeky AI dual zone trigger for example has two piezo. My snare has two piezo making it a dual zone snare. Because the module can determine center, rim, rim shot, edge, and off center hits doesn’t make it a five zone snare.

    In the grand scheme of things I’m new to eDrums... I’ve only been around them for a year now. I’d be curious as to how others define “dual zone”.
    Last edited by Mylo; 05-12-20, 08:12 AM.
    PDP Concept Maple A2E with Bum Wraps; Pearl Crystal Beat Octobans; Jobeky AI dual-zone triggers; drum-tec Real Feel and Billy Blast Ballistech 3.0 mesh heads; ATV cymbals; Gibralter hardware; Offset double pedal; DW Remote hi-hat stands; Yamaha FC7; two eDRUMin10 devices; Alesis Strike Amp 8; Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 3rd Gen; Intel NUC with Windows 10 Pro; SD3

  • #2
    Originally posted by Mylo View Post
    To me a zone is defined simply as one triggering device, be it a piezo or switch or whatever. When I go shopping for triggers or cymbals I see single zone (for example, one piezo), dual zone (for example, some combination of piezo and switch) or triple zone (for example, some combination of piezo and switches).
    + 1, same for me.

    It is a simplification. ATV Pad with 6 Piezos is still Dual Zone for me.

    Once you think About it, with Positional Sensing, Rimshot and Sidestick detection.. it is tricky sometimes.



    Audiofront eDrumIn. Triggering mainly SD3.

    Yamaha Cymbals, drum-tec HiHat Ctl, DW PDP Drumset with Jobeky Triggers and drumtec Pro Snare. Zoom UAC-2 Interface.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Mylo View Post
      The subject of what dual zone or zone means as come up in a couple of conversations lately and it seems to mean two different things. Which can be confusing to a new user.

      To me a zone is defined simply as one triggering device, be it a piezo or switch or whatever. When I go shopping for triggers or cymbals I see single zone (for example, one piezo), dual zone (for example, some combination of piezo and switch) or triple zone (for example, some combination of piezo and switches).

      But I see people using zone to mean an area of the pad or cymbal that can send a discrete note. So a pad that can send a center and rim is called a dual zone pad.

      I find it confusing to mix the two. I like the first definition because it seems to match what vendors use when describing a pad or cymbal. A Jobeky AI dual zone trigger for example has two piezo. My snare has two piezo making it a dual zone snare. Because the module can determine center, rim, rim shot, edge, and off center hits doesn’t make it a five zone snare.

      In the grand scheme of things I’m new to eDrums... I’ve only been around them for a year now. I’d be curious as to how others define “dual zone”.
      That definition can get confusing as well nowadays. How many zones does an ATV snare have? It has 6 sensors. Or their ride, it has 5 sensors? How many zones does a roland digital snare have? It has like 7 sensors? To me a snare is a two zone device no matter how many sensors it has. It is defined by how many parts of the instrument you can play on. You can play either the rim or the head. It doesn't matter that it can produce 5 different sounds plus gradual variation between two sounds.

      A cymbal can have one sensor and be three zones if it has a tracking algorithm for it.

      Or for instance the side trigger device that scans a drum and can produce like 20 zones per pad from one sensor. How do you define that? I don't know to be honest. To me that would be 20 zones because they truly are distinct zones.
      Last edited by frankzappa; 05-12-20, 08:26 AM.

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      • #4
        frankzappaholzi2000 great points. Cleared up some ignorance on my part. Stealth Drums also has a 6 piezo trigger system, three are for the head and three are for the rim but I see that as a dual-zone trigger system.

        So... a zone is defined as the area of the pad that can be triggered regardless of the number of devices sensing the hit. The actual articulations that can be determined from these triggered zones is dependent on the module but to me should not be confused with triggered zones.

        Example: a single zone tom (one triggered zone regardless of piezo count) connected to an eDRUMin with Edge Sense turned on is still a single zone pad despite eDRUMin’s ability to generate two articulations. If you call this “dual zone” it can be misleading because, in this case, you have lost the ability to get a rim shot because you don’t have the second triggered zone to determine if a rim shot has indeed been hit.
        Last edited by Mylo; 05-12-20, 09:40 AM.
        PDP Concept Maple A2E with Bum Wraps; Pearl Crystal Beat Octobans; Jobeky AI dual-zone triggers; drum-tec Real Feel and Billy Blast Ballistech 3.0 mesh heads; ATV cymbals; Gibralter hardware; Offset double pedal; DW Remote hi-hat stands; Yamaha FC7; two eDRUMin10 devices; Alesis Strike Amp 8; Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 3rd Gen; Intel NUC with Windows 10 Pro; SD3

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        • #5
          Originally posted by frankzappa View Post
          Or for instance the side trigger device that scans a drum and can produce like 20 zones per pad from one sensor. How do you define that? I don't know to be honest. To me that would be 20 zones because they truly are distinct zones.
          Wouldn’t this be a single zone pad that can play 20 articulations? The pad itself has the single triggered zone. Isn’t it the module that would determine the 20 articulations? Unless in this case the pad and module are contained in one neat little package.
          Last edited by Mylo; 05-12-20, 09:47 AM.
          PDP Concept Maple A2E with Bum Wraps; Pearl Crystal Beat Octobans; Jobeky AI dual-zone triggers; drum-tec Real Feel and Billy Blast Ballistech 3.0 mesh heads; ATV cymbals; Gibralter hardware; Offset double pedal; DW Remote hi-hat stands; Yamaha FC7; two eDRUMin10 devices; Alesis Strike Amp 8; Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 3rd Gen; Intel NUC with Windows 10 Pro; SD3

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          • #6
            also agree to me it means trigger areas. if you can trigger head/rim = dual zone, head only = single zone.

            i have j-man's stealth ism-6 trigger and i'd consider it a dual zone.
            Alesis STRIKE, PD-85 rack toms, PD-105BK floor tom, Mapex snare with ISM-6, PDP MX 22" kick with ISM, iron cobra 900 double pedal, hart e-cymbal2, CY-5 as splash, CY-8, CY-12R, L80 hi-hat with cheap-o trigger with goedrum hi hat controller. EZdrummer2+EZX/Addictive Drums 2 VSTs.

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            • #7
              Two zones means two areas that can be given a sound (trigger). My old TD6V kit I have two zone cymbals and I can designate each zone its own individual sound, Ie the cymbal rim could be made a base drum and the cymbal bow could be made a cow bell, or whatever else you want. If its in the library of sounds it can be associated to any zone (area) you want. That's my take on it anyway mate. Have fun and stay safe.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Mylo View Post

                Wouldn’t this be a single zone pad that can play 20 articulations? The pad itself has the single triggered zone. Isn’t it the module that would determine the 20 articulations? Unless in this case the pad and module are contained in one neat little package.
                No, it has clearly distinct areas on the head where you can trigger sounds.

                I would say a single piezo tom that is made to trigger both rim and head is a dual zone when used with an edrumin.

                Anyway the definition of single, dual, triple zone is outdated. It was made up many years ago where you had to have a piezo or switch to trigger a sound. Nowadays it's better to just say what it can do.

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                • #9
                  frankzappa I just watched 65 Drums video on Sensory Percussion. Yep... crazy. Clearly doesn’t fit with traditional definitions of zones.
                  PDP Concept Maple A2E with Bum Wraps; Pearl Crystal Beat Octobans; Jobeky AI dual-zone triggers; drum-tec Real Feel and Billy Blast Ballistech 3.0 mesh heads; ATV cymbals; Gibralter hardware; Offset double pedal; DW Remote hi-hat stands; Yamaha FC7; two eDRUMin10 devices; Alesis Strike Amp 8; Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 3rd Gen; Intel NUC with Windows 10 Pro; SD3

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                  • #10
                    It means I can set the sprinkler system to water the front yard at a different time than the back yard. Oh wait......wrong forum.

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                    • #11
                      Now I am confused, I've been trying to get instructions on how to grow Lupins. So this is the wrong forum then. Well I'm bugg-red.

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                      • #12
                        As you've found, there's a bunch of different triggers that can now do multiple "zones" so the terms will start to lose their meaning or be redefined at some point, but typically it's just viewed as the distinct zones you can play to generate a sound.

                        The confusion with rimshots and different areas of positional sensing I would categorise as articulations of zones, if talking about Roland modules and the way most others also use. Rimshots on a Roland module are activated by triggering crosstalk between the two zones - when you strike both together, it gives a different articulation. And again, the positional changes are articulations within the head zone.
                        Whereas on a Yamaha snare pad a there's a defined zone for a cross-stick sound and one for a rimshot as it has a defined triggerable pad area for each. A Yamaha cymbal is a 3 zone pad but it's only a 2 zone when hooked up to a Roland module.

                        So yeah, the definitions sort of blur between the hardware and the module that is processing it. It comes down to the result of the two interacting and it definitely gets a bit hazy when you start factoring in things like eDrumin's zone detection and other different methods of triggering.
                        Last edited by Pulsc; 05-13-20, 06:12 PM.
                        The eDrum Workshop | YouTube

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                        • #13
                          The amount of zones should be directly related to the amount of individual channels on a trigger.

                          Once you involve the module processing, for sure, you would walk into a massive grey area. Best not to even include the module in the equation imo, so everybody knows what to talk about and because it's the module that makes a 3rd zone out of a 2-zone piezo drum pad, not the drum pad itself.

                          So in short, zones means amount of separate (raw sensor) channels that are available in the trigger.
                          ◾ Diamond Drums 4pc in Di-Noc carbon ◾ MegaDRUM
                          ◾ Roland UA-1010 / cymbals / KT-10 (x2) ◾ Tama / Gibraltar hardware ◾ JBL LSR3 Series 2.1 Monitoring ◾ Pearl THMP-1
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                          • #14
                            you should ask ATV what a zone is.. then you'd get an interesting answer, like "a zone is a segment that can produce a tone, this tone
                            can be different from a clone, or an instrument" ..(for me, i can have driver seat at 21 C and passenger seat at 18 C)
                            Audio | Video | Roland/Yamaha e-kit | Sonor/Gretsch a-kit | Zildjian/Sabian/Ufip cymbals

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Kabonfaiba View Post
                              The amount of zones should be directly related to the amount of individual channels on a trigger.

                              Once you involve the module processing, for sure, you would walk into a massive grey area. Best not to even include the module in the equation imo, so everybody knows what to talk about and because it's the module that makes a 3rd zone out of a 2-zone piezo drum pad, not the drum pad itself.

                              So in short, zones means amount of separate (raw sensor) channels that are available in the trigger.
                              Although I might be missing a corner case, this is more or less my interpretation as well: 1 zone sends out one varying signal and is independent from the number of piezos needed to calculate this first raw signal. Whether the module (or e.g. the chip inside the digital snare) can create more signals when processing input from two zones is, in my opinion, out of scope.

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