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  • #61
    Originally posted by Excessium View Post
    Its size isn't exclusive, though. Even in terms of triggering, it's debatable whether you can say it's better than the ATV 18" because the Roland one might have more sensors but it doesn't have proper 360 degree triggering. I imagine the positional sensing is better on the Roland one at least. I don't know if my TD-12 is at fault, but with my 16" ATV cymbal the PS is all over the place and basically unusable.
    I have found that the 360 triggering is not consistent around the ATV cymbals. There are zones that tend to be less responsive / sensitive than others. Maybe the production quality has improved on the newer cymbals. Personally, I could careless about the 360 triggering. I never hit the opposite side of a cymbal and my e-cymbals don’t rotate when playing them.
    ATV aDrums, TD-50, aD5, Superior Drummer 3.0, Roland SPD-SX, Tama & DW Hardware.

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    • #62
      Chance27 wrote:
      I have found that the 360 triggering is not consistent around the ATV cymbals. There are zones that tend to be less responsive / sensitive than others. Maybe the production quality has improved on the newer cymbals. Personally, I could care less about the 360 triggering. I never hit the opposite side of a cymbal and my e-cymbals don't rotate when playing them.
      I don't think 360 degree triggering is mainly for striking the back of the cymbal, though I sometimes do this with acoustic cymbals. And similarly, I don't think its primary design goal is to combat cymbal rotation, though this is another benefit. There are two main advantages to 360 triggering I know of, and I'd be surprised if these are not somewhere in desinger's minds:

      (1) Bow-to-bell patterns. The most common way of playing bow-to-bell patterns is to approach the cymbal 90 degrees off front axis, to allow suitable angle for the shank of the stick to contact the bell. Stick tip plays the bow and stick shank plays the bell. When you do this on many e-cymbals, the triggering and dynamics are off, because the cymbals are only fully sensitive in front.

      (2) Glancing crashes. When crashing a cymbal, it's common not to approach from the front. Rather, a glancing side-stroke is used, thus playing out of and away from the cymbal. Playing into and through a cymbal from the front stresses the edge, bow, and mounting hole, and puts unnecessary stress on the human body, because you're accepting the impact into your body rather than glancing past it. Again, many e-cymbals don't trigger well when glanced off front axis, and yet this is one of the most common ways of playing a cymbal. About the only time I approach a cymbal head on, from the front, is for playing ride patterns, and even then I use many areas of the cymbal.

      So, in my estimation, the key value of 360 degree triggering is addressing those two problems. It may fix other problems, too.
      Last edited by TangTheHump; 12-14-19, 01:24 AM.

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