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Choosing drum sounds

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  • Tictag drummer
    started a topic Choosing drum sounds

    Choosing drum sounds

    I am considering buying an acoustic drum set at some point and Iím trying to figure out what sounds I like. My drummodule is very limited and doesnít really give me a good idea of what I like. Does anybody have any suggestions on how to get an idea of what drum sounds you like? Is there a place where you can listen to a lot of different drum and cymbal sounds? Or something like that. Any other tips on how to choose drums are very welcome as well. Thanks in advance everybody.

  • MilosDrummer
    replied
    Originally posted by billgtx View Post

    Coming at this from a different angle... Listen more critically to the music you like to listen to. What does the snare sound like? A high pitch crack? A deep thwack? Does it ring or is it muted? Same with other voices. Are the cymbals bright or dark? This may can help give you an idea of where your tastes fall.
    Modern music, being heavily processed with drum sounds layered and triggered, can be very missleading to what you should buy to have that sound. Guys endorse and advertise Tamas and Pearls while recording on Ludwigs and Slingerlands, and still slap on a sample over it...

    Drum modules came to be loaded with sounds in order to give versatility (I'm looking at you Roland's 50 ), because I like a good high pitched funky snare, and a deep lush brass monster, I like my 13" hats, and regulary use 14" heavies too. I record on a 22" wallnut, and carry a 18" maple to gigs... What's not to like?

    Start with cheaper allrounders such as a Pearl Decade, or a Mapex Meridian, or Tama Superstar or an all time favourite Yammy Stage Custom and you won't go wrong! Play it, tune it, swap the heads, cymbals and sticks as often as you can, and you'll learn what you like! Sit behind as many other drums as you can, that all will train your ears, hands and taste much better than any yt lesson or any sample from a VST or a module. Cheers!

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  • billgtx
    replied
    Originally posted by Tictag drummer View Post
    Does anybody have any suggestions on how to get an idea of what drum sounds you like?
    Coming at this from a different angle... Listen more critically to the music you like to listen to. What does the snare sound like? A high pitch crack? A deep thwack? Does it ring or is it muted? Same with other voices. Are the cymbals bright or dark? This may can help give you an idea of where your tastes fall.

    And also from what I've seen kits come and go but drummers tend to keep snares and cymbals they like.

    My opinion only:. The toms and bass drum are less important and the chosen head has the most impact on how a drum sounds. Moreso than the wood type. Others may disagree but I've personally seen low mid range shells made to sound awesome with just a change to the right heads.

    Usually a good drum store will have a room where you can try out cymbals. But even that's not a perfect solution. I've bought cymbals I thought sounded good until I got them on the kit and realized they weren't for me.

    One other suggestion. Watch a lot of drum lessons on YouTube. Generally the lessons don't have a lot of music hindering the sound of the drums so you can hear the drums pretty clearly.

    Hope this helps.

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  • spillitnkillit
    replied
    If you can't play or try out various modules, in my opinion the next best thing you can do is lookup the Drum-Tec TV channel on YouTube. They have great sounding demos. Just be careful because some of the videos are their own modified sound packages for each module. Try to find the one that is just a standard module playthrough, they have them for most modules out there.

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  • MilosDrummer
    replied
    I must say, the idea of choosing an acoustic drum or a cymbal starting from eDrums is not a good practice. Not even listening to the recordings (eg. some retail websites have them) can give you the true feel of what you like. Play as many acoustics as you can, try to have them well tuned and in a venue matching to where you expect to use them. If you don't have much experience, odds are you'll need to adjust your technique and ears to a different kind of sound and feel. Decent rehearsal rooms or jam sessions (open stages) are the best places to start.

    The thing is, acoustic drums and our taste in them depend on much more factors than eDrums to have a certain sound and feel. Just having different heads or cymbals or tuning can make you love or hate a kit, not to mention the room and other instruments, levels, ergonomic setup, down to the model of the sticks you use (those thingies alter the sound greatly). Time, practice and experience through trial and error make you able to tell what sounds good with certanity. That's what makes the game interesting for me

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