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How good our v-drums really sound?

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  • MilosDrummer
    replied
    Originally posted by Intruder View Post
    At the end of the day, 99.5 out of 100 entertained people don't know / care if the drums sound good or not. They listen to the whole sound of the band. If the rhythm and voice is in the style they like they will enjoy themselves.
    You can sometimes hear someone say "the singer missed a word or was off key" hardly ever hear " the drummer missed a paradiddle or his snare was too far back in the mix".
    Sound level / feedback is noticed and a drummer that just plays bad is another issue all together.
    Listen to any recorded band / song and see how many people can pick out the one using a e-drum. Even if they can they ain't gonna care if the music sounds good to them.
    When was the last time you ever heard someone say (other than another drummer) " Man, the band rocked last night". "If only the drums would of been a acoustic kit".
    Just my 1.05 cents.
    You just made most of the topics here redundant :-D

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  • Intruder
    replied
    At the end of the day, 99.5 out of 100 entertained people don't know / care if the drums sound good or not. They listen to the whole sound of the band. If the rhythm and voice is in the style they like they will enjoy themselves.
    You can sometimes hear someone say "the singer missed a word or was off key" hardly ever hear " the drummer missed a paradiddle or his snare was too far back in the mix".
    Sound level / feedback is noticed and a drummer that just plays bad is another issue all together.
    Listen to any recorded band / song and see how many people can pick out the one using a e-drum. Even if they can they ain't gonna care if the music sounds good to them.
    When was the last time you ever heard someone say (other than another drummer) " Man, the band rocked last night". "If only the drums would of been a acoustic kit".
    Just my 1.05 cents.

    Leave a comment:


  • MilosDrummer
    replied
    Originally posted by BWaj View Post

    This is pretty much BS. You can go stereo out from a decent edrum kit and sound great out front. Even with one of the band members running sound. Sure, the ekit has to sound good first, but that's like saying you have to tune your akit first. Meanwhile, even a great sounding akit will sound like ass out front without good mics and sound guy. The snare, ride and HH overpower the rest of the kit, etc.

    Akits work in tow scenarios. You mic nothing in a small venue and play very lightly so you are not overpowering everything, while also being sure to lay off your snare, hats and ride. Or you have a great sound guy with great gear. Otherwise any decent ekit will sound far superior in the total mix.
    I've had so many gigs playing acoustics in places tuned for a DJ with soundguys used to DJs and sounded crap... with well tuned drumsets... No, an e-drum is not a solution to all problems wether it's a drummer that doesn't know how to 'tune' them or the tech unused to them or the PA set for a DJ.

    'E-kit has to sound good first' is the topic here. Yes it's subjective, and yes some of us get it wrong. Yes, we should talk about it cause also the opposite happens... Mid tier e-drums can also sound great if you know how to tune them and if they go through a proper chain, and if you listen through a decent system/headphones. Sounds obvious, right? Wrong, many flawed opinions come from not understanding these points, and people expect to have good sounding kits just cause they're electronic. How do you make sure they sound good in the first place?

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  • BWaj
    replied
    Originally posted by MilosDrummer View Post
    If anyone would've been judging the td30 and meyer PA system by my todays gig, they would gladly blame either of those or the professional sound guy for a very poor presentation. Knowing the back story, the sound guy was to blame but only cause of lack of experience with live e-drums! One simply cannot treat e drums or vst like acoustics. If the module had balanced direct outs with microphone impedance, plugged into mic preamps maybe it could've been similar. This way it's just a synth!

    So yes, my point again, e drums depend on the same things as acoustics (and some more) but in a very different way! Taming this beast requires good taste but also a lot of skill and experimenting. I think Alan can agree on that.
    This is pretty much BS. You can go stereo out from a decent edrum kit and sound great out front. Even with one of the band members running sound. Sure, the ekit has to sound good first, but that's like saying you have to tune your akit first. Meanwhile, even a great sounding akit will sound like ass out front without good mics and sound guy. The snare, ride and HH overpower the rest of the kit, etc.

    Akits work in tow scenarios. You mic nothing in a small venue and play very lightly so you are not overpowering everything, while also being sure to lay off your snare, hats and ride. Or you have a great sound guy with great gear. Otherwise any decent ekit will sound far superior in the total mix.

    Leave a comment:


  • MilosDrummer
    replied
    If anyone would've been judging the td30 and meyer PA system by my todays gig, they would gladly blame either of those or the professional sound guy for a very poor presentation. Knowing the back story, the sound guy was to blame but only cause of lack of experience with live e-drums! One simply cannot treat e drums or vst like acoustics. If the module had balanced direct outs with microphone impedance, plugged into mic preamps maybe it could've been similar. This way it's just a synth!

    So yes, my point again, e drums depend on the same things as acoustics (and some more) but in a very different way! Taming this beast requires good taste but also a lot of skill and experimenting. I think Alan can agree on that.

    Leave a comment:


  • New Tricks
    replied
    Originally posted by tivi View Post
    NewTricks, what mixer are you using on the left of your TD-30?
    Yes, it's a TM 16. Great mixer. We can pretty much set it and forget it.

    Leave a comment:


  • BWaj
    replied
    There are several things here. Some people do not mic up acoustic kits, so they are used to the sound of the drum only. Others only mic up and use plenty of FX on the acoustic kit. There is a huge difference between an acoustic kit for a band like Journey that uses the best mics, FX and also triggers sounds and an unic'd kit. Hands down the edrums sound closer to a well process A kit from a top act than an unmic'd kit will. If you prefer the raw sound, don't use edrums.

    Leave a comment:


  • MilosDrummer
    replied
    Originally posted by tivi View Post
    NewTricks, what mixer are you using on the left of your TD-30?
    It's a QSC touch mix 16, if I'm not mistaken...

    Leave a comment:


  • tivi
    replied
    I like your 3-zones PD7/PD9 ... ride :P

    Leave a comment:


  • tivi
    replied
    NewTricks, what mixer are you using on the left of your TD-30?

    Leave a comment:


  • New Tricks
    replied
    Ekit.jpeg
    Originally posted by markfireprime View Post
    Just my 2 cents but. I use edrums for 3 reasons
    I could have/ would have written those reasons exactly as you did . The Ekit rocks and it's the centerpiece for our consistent mix. Everything runs thru the PA and no stage volume means everyone can hear the exact FOH mix in the monitors and play/sing accordingly.
    Last edited by New Tricks; 12-05-18, 11:45 AM.

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  • NathanE
    replied
    Another 2c to say I don't think this is different e and a. If you are in a small venue where acoustic noise is an issue for the mix you need to mess round with playing with less dynamics, rods or some other sound attenuation on an acoustic set from your seat without being able to hear the room mix. If you are in a big enough venue to require pa on an a set you are dependent on the sound guy to get the house mix right.

    I play most regularly in a medium sized church where we have sound folks with varying levels of skill. Being able now to give individual mic feeds or a simple l/r pair from the mimic means whatever their experience I can give them a feed they are happy to work with.

    Leave a comment:


  • markfireprime
    replied
    Just my 2 cents but. I use edrums for 3 reasons A i want to record a great drum sound at home..... that aint happening with and acoustic kit. B i play too loud so for some venues i need an ekit to clam the volume.. C sometimes in a multi band set up and a strange venue we just simply have B grade techs so i can tune my edrums in on 2 channels and its almost idiot prof ( almost)As far as what we look for in a moduel i guess i and maybve most people want it to play like a real kit with everything that entails.. thats hard to get... and we want it to sound some like OUR idea of a good drum kit.. i guess thats why im trying to go mimic.. right now sound wise it seems to be the best in sounds right now... but again someone may have a different idea... I love this sight simply because i hate the tech side of edrums so these guys really just do a lot of the work for me and give me great starting points... I guess close your eyes and listen to each ekit you can find the one that sounds like YOU and enjoy..


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  • M-R
    replied
    When I was playing gigs / touring, I always used acoustic sets. I'd tune my drums, & if I had to do it, make sure the mic placement was adequate. That's as technical as I got


    So, coming from a non technical standpoint on electronic drums, from someone just playing with friends for fun, my kit sounds good


    I understand many of you guys are playing professionally, recording and / or just striving for the absolute best sound you can squeeze out of them, & that's great, but my thing is, if it sounds like a tom, a snare, a bass & cymbals, I'm fine with it

    Get the toms tuned in sync, have the snare sound similar to an actual snare & get the crappy rubber circles on cymbal stands to sound like something other than a rubber circle on a stand, and I'm good to go

    It sounds like a drum set? OK, I'm done. Pop open some beers & lets play some tunes

    Leave a comment:


  • Antonalog
    replied
    Downside to v-drums for me is that sticks on plastic/rubber and metal clacking pedals sound pretty unmusical so you need to have great isolation on headphones and/or really crank the volume to obliterate that sound. Everything sounds better louder right? Once recorded though, it all sounds great. Still it would be nice if there was some wonder material that didn't have that problem so much.
    On the plus side, at least my cymbal hits sound better and my wimpy kicks aren't so much of a problem as they are on acoustic, but maybe those are beginner's problems ? Or I should find some better cymbals...

    Leave a comment:

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