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Please help me choose a Beginner's Electronic Drum Set

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  • Please help me choose a Beginner's Electronic Drum Set

    Hello

    As an absolute beginner, I'm looking to buy an Electronic Drum Set. The most important attributes I'm looking for are quality, durability, and most importantly - compact size (as I don't have too much room).

    I live in Israel, so I am forced to buy from Local shops where the prices are considerably higher than, say, the U.S., so don't be surprised by the prices.

    For now I've narrowed down my list to 5 possible options, and I'd like to hear your insights about them:

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    1. Alesis DM Lite - Costs $500 here - It's the cheapest option, and a very compact one at that. However, it looks kinda toy-like and, from what I've read, is mainly oriented to kids. It also doesn't seem durable and I honestly wouldn't want my set breaking down on me within 2 months of use.

    2. Behringer XD8USB - Costs $620 here - It looks better than the Alesis DM Lite, but I've read mixed reviews about it. Not sure how it compares to Roland/Yamaha/Alesis quality-wise, and I'm also not sure about its size.

    3. Alesis Nitro Kit - Costs $700 here - It's got great reviews and it seems to be the ultimate beginner's kit. However it's also the heaviest and biggest of my options as far as I can see, so it might be somewhat of a pain to move it around. Also, at $700, it looks rather overpriced compared to the next options:

    4. Yamaha DTX400K - Costs $730, only $30 more than the Alesis Nitro Kit, however I assume it's a step up quality-wise? Not sure how it compares to the Roland TD-1K (which we'll get to in a minute), but it seems a little bigger. Other than that it looks like a close call.

    5. Roland TD-1K - costs $800 - On paper this is the ideal candidate, being praised for quality, durability and compact size alike. Its only obvious disadvantage is its cost, being the priciest option. So is it worth the extra $$$ over the previous options?

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    I'd really appreciate if you could share your insights with me, regarding these drum sets.

    Thanks in advance!

  • #2
    I think it's a hard question to answer because only you know how important each aspect of a kit is and how much you really are comfortable spending. I went for a td4kp because portability was my number 1 priority. If you search youtube for "65 drums" he has some good video's discussing these and other options.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by FraserP View Post
      I think it's a hard question to answer because only you know how important each aspect of a kit is and how much you really are comfortable spending. I went for a td4kp because portability was my number 1 priority. If you search youtube for "65 drums" he has some good video's discussing these and other options.
      Well I guess you are correct as I didn't quite clarify my priorities properly.

      I'd say portability/compact size is most important, as I simply don't have enough room for a drum set that isn't small & light enough to move around if needed (e.g. Move it temporarily to another room when washing mine).

      And of course I wouldn't want it dying on me anytime soon, so build quality & durability are also important (I figured it's really the same thing in my view).

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      • #4
        The Roland TD-1K is an ok option, it caries the Roland name but it's not amazing compared to higher up Roland Models. The TD-1KV (note the V here) would be a big step up if it's available just because of the Mesh head on the snare drum. The snare is the one that you will use the most for ghost notes etc, so having that as a mesh head is very useful and will be useful to you as you get more advanced.

        The Alesis Nitro Kit is pretty good. Actually not bad at all for the price range.

        TBH - I don't think any of these kits are amazing really. You could consider getting a used kit for the same price that would be a lot better.

        Check out the linked guide below for more ideas on this. The Roland TD-11K is quite expensive for example, but there are quite a few previous generation models that are very good that you could get your hands on as a used model. These would also not take up that much space really.
        Your source of the best electronic drum set reviews, resources, and tips for 2018. Cheap entry-level kits to the top-end professional electronic sets.

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        • #5
          I'm not sure how viable it is to look for used kits in Israel (I'm guessing it's a small market) but that's definitely the route I went, back in the day. But even if you go new, consider that in terms of size, you can easily and quickly "fold up" most rack mounted e-kits to a very small size when not in use. It's what I do.
          Last edited by monospace; 01-15-18, 02:10 PM.
          Module: TD-9v2. Kick: KD-8. Snare: PD-120. Hats: VH-11. Toms: 3 x PD-80R. Crashes: CY-12RC, CY-14. Ride: CY-15R. Aux: BT-1. Pedal: Iron Cobra with KAT Silent Strike beater. Tama Swivel hi-hat stand.

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          • #6
            I spent a lot of time researching options last year. The TD 1KV is a great option from what I've read. The mesh head is also a good idea. Check your local sales websites. I've seen them as low as $350 used.

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