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Rubber cymbal pads and wrist damage

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  • Rubber cymbal pads and wrist damage

    In the Spring of 2002 I bought my first 'V-drums' (TD8) after more than forty years of accoustics. I love the flexibility of the electronic drums both live and in the studio/practice, but my kit has the old PD-7 rubber pads for cymbals. I'm finding my wrists are beginning to suffer. I've started using my Sabians from the accoustic kit because they feel better. Are the new V cymbals any closer to the feel of real cymbals? At my advanced age (!) I'm very wary of doing permanent damage.

    Has anybody any suggestions or advice for me?
    Thanks

  • #2
    Yes, the v-cymbals are easier on the wrists due to the swing. You can crash them like an acoustic cymbal. Try them out if you can.
    Roland TD-20 v1.08, various v-drums and v-cymbals, Yamaha KP65's, Axis pedals, Gibraltar hardware, Mackie 1202/SRM450 (pre-china)

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    • #3
      When I first started playing E-Drums it was on an old TD-5 kit (PD-5 Pads). My right elbow used to hurt something awful after an hour of playing. I have not had that problem with my V-Pro set with PD-9 cymbal pads.

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      • #4
        cymbal pads and wrists

        Thanks ufotofu for the advice. I wondered if it was just my technique that was causing the problem. I'll try out some v-cymbals soon. I can always use the PD7s for effects.
        Parkkeeper

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        • #5
          Make sure you change your sticks if you are using hard rubber pads. Wooden sticks absorb some of the impact on your wrist, but this fades as they get more worn.

          Problem is that with a's our sticks wear out usually before this starts to happen, but this is not so with e's.

          When I had a td7 kit (all rubber pads) I used to try to follow through on the cymbal pads, like you tend to with acoustic cymbals, and had similar problems. I had to change by style a bit to solve similar problems. However with v cymbals there should be no problem
          Last edited by Daveb; 06-29-02, 04:48 AM.

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          • #6
            Along the lines of sticks, I know they're not for everybody, but I find when I'm playing E's only, especially if it's only rubber pads(as opposed to mesh), my Easton AHEAD 5A's are a great choice. They've got this wierd design feature that's suposed to reduce the shock to your wrists and knuckles. I whack away on PD-5's with those things and I haven't had any troubles. Depending on how your situation pans out, you might wanto to consider invesitng in a pair. You won't have to worry about them wearing out for a few good years.

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            • #7
              I found these broke after 12 months of use on rubber pads, but I could make 3 pairs of wood sticks last last the same time.

              It has to be your own personal choice of what works for you.


              David



              Originally posted by Jaay
              Along the lines of sticks, I know they're not for everybody, but I find when I'm playing E's only, especially if it's only rubber pads(as opposed to mesh), my Easton AHEAD 5A's are a great choice. They've got this wierd design feature that's suposed to reduce the shock to your wrists and knuckles. I whack away on PD-5's with those things and I haven't had any troubles. Depending on how your situation pans out, you might wanto to consider invesitng in a pair. You won't have to worry about them wearing out for a few good years.

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              • #8
                When I bought my V-Drums after playing for 25 years on acoustics, I took one swing at the PD-7's that were to be used as cymbals. After the first hit, I knew that there would be problems with the hard rubber and plastic frame. So there they sat in my closet while I used some plastic Pintech cymbals. They required upkeep (luckily I have tools and a soldering iron at home and even had to replace the piezeo trigger element on one ove the course of 3 years), but have a feel similar to real cymbals in that they deform and absorb the shock. Then about a year ago, I bought some V-cymbals and started playing on them. That's about when my shoulder tendinitis started and hasn't stopped. In the last year, I've taken 100's of naproxin anti-imflamatory pills, ultrasound, ice packs, etc. I was only able to play drums or tennis for a few months out of the last year. I am no longer in denial about the V-Cyms (denial was because they were so expensive) and will get an MRI soon to check for permanent damage to my shoulders. I think that the V-Hi Hat or V-Ride was less of a problem for me than the V-crash. When I start up again after I am healed, I will look into the Hart II cymbals, since there is a built-in cymbal spring and the cymbal itself is low inertia.

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                • #9
                  Thanks everyone for the really helpful advice. I'll go and look out the Ahead sticks. I currently use Vic Firths and do change them very regularly. I'm so sorry to hear of all your problems tsk101. There's a very salutary lesson there for all of us drummers of whatever age. I hope to keep playing well into old age (OK, so I'm nearly there already) and don't want to buy any gear which is going to put my hands, shoulders, wrists at risk. I do exercises to keep supple, and a friend of mine swears by Glucosamine tablets. He also takes New Zealand green lipped mussel tablets ('Seatone' brand name in UK). I had to have Knee surgery last year but am pleased it has been a complete success - my surgeon said it was more likely the damage was caused by carrying my kit than by playing it!

                  This thread is beginning to sound like a report from the retirement home - I'm sorry if I've depressed anyone!

                  Parkkeeper

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                  • #10
                    Hi Parkkeeper.
                    I have a Td-6 kit with CY-6 cymbals, very comfortable to play, and the pads are rubber. I really uses strong hits on they, and after all this time (six months), don't have notice any problem with my wirsts and elbows. I uses Vic-Firth's too, Steve Gadd signature series, wood tip, and they absorbes the chock very well (shure, if you stay completely relax and let the stick almost free in your hand).
                    The stick is heavy and long, and this is helpful to avoid damage to us, poor drummers...
                    Hope this helps you.
                    Regards...
                    :D :cool:

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                    • #11
                      Hi Jaay'

                      It's been a while, but I've got my hands on a pair of AHEAD sticks and I'm very impressed. They do seem to help absorb the shock on wrists. All my prejudices are tumbling! Electronic drums ...... aluminium sticks....... whatever next?

                      Parkkeeper.

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                      • #12
                        There's one thing i always stress myself into doing.. Warm up properly before playing any kind of drums, tablas, congas or whatever your desire is

                        To give you a pointer of what I do to warm up, here goes:

                        - Carefully play "in the air" with no sticks and just wrists for 7-10 minutes.
                        - Same thing, but this time with sticks
                        - Then i do some loose "show of playing" where i try to use all the teqhniques i know of.
                        This has kept me fit for nearly 20 years of drumming, i have never experienced any problems with my hands or shoulders.

                        And a tip for using the "Non V-cymbal pads": If you have good controll of your stick-impact on the pad, use the module to set the sensitivity as "loose" as you can. (Double trigging may be a problem). Personally i only use the "rubber pads" for effects and china's.

                        And please exscuse my poor English, i am after all, Norwegian..
                        Paradidle - A simple rudiment you need a lifetime to master.

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                        • #13
                          So, that's it...It's a matter of choices, and you do yours...I'm glad that you are very comfortable with AHEAD'S sticks..I've heard about they...ROCK ON Park....
                          :D :cool:

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                          • #14
                            Hey parkkeeper.

                            Glad to see those AHEADs work out for you.

                            "All my prejudices are tumbling! Electronic drums ...... aluminium sticks....... whatever next?"

                            Hey, in ten years, it won't matter what sticks we use, we'll al be hooked up to the system through a skin-contact headband rigged with neural sensros that read our thought patterns and transfer them into the module.

                            Glad to see you can get back to stress-free playing. Groove on.

                            -Jaay

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                            • #15
                              me too. my last month has consisted of 2 weeks playing a td8, 2 weeks with my arm bandaged with rsi/tendonitis whatever.

                              thanks for the advice - ahead sticks on order, and a rigid warmup system in place. not that i needed it on my acoustic kit for the last 20 years.....

                              "My wife and I were happy for twenty years. Then we met."

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