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Never sell out - your Acoustics that is!!

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  • Never sell out - your Acoustics that is!!

    Well I hope I don't get flamed on this. This is NOT, repeat NOT - an Edrum vs. Adrum thread.

    Just a word of experiance - if you have a 'good' set of acoustics, and aren't starving - don't sell them. Fate has a strange way of working it's magic.

    Short story made long:

    I got my VPro set back in 1999. Was in 2nd heaven (I've since moved to 3rd heaven with the TDW-1 card). I put my dream Pearl MLX acoustic set up for sale for a fraction of their worth - but that wasn't low enough for the bloodsuckers, so they sat in my closet for over two years. I'd drag the snare out every year to play a march cadance at the civic Memorial Day parade, but not much more.

    My church praise band and my band '4Given' was having a great time with my V's - life couldn't get better - or could it....?

    Out of the blue, and by a few minutes of chance, I meet someone who was starting up a new Christian rock band. So with V's in tow, I audition, everyone loves the V's - life is great.

    But then the statistical reality sets in - I'm now in 3 bands, and the hauling/set-up/tear-down of my gear is getting really old fast. So I say to my new band "BAND, how about me's playing my acoustics." They says "OK".

    Well now I play my acoustics with one band - which is more on the heavy rock sound - perfect match for my acoustics, and use my VPro's with my other 2 bands - which the musical style can change from light rock to mellow to far out with each song, hence a perfect match for my ever versital V's.

    Honestly, I'd love to play the V's all the time, but I truely believe that my playing is getting better and more focused on both 'tools' of the trade. Oh and for the studio recordings next year - it will be the V's for both bands.

    Anyhow - what if I had sold my acoustics at a loss? Would I have had this unique dual opportunity? Ummmmmm.....

    So my advice to you all is - if you don't have to, don't sell your dream acoustics, unless they were a piece of C*#@ anyway.

    We now turn this thread over to the opposing view. Have fun and play on!!

    Driving a great song is better than driving a great car!!

    http://mysite.verizon.net/landin82/

  • #2
    Totally agree. That goes for cymbals too!!!
    Rarely will you make your money back on musical instruments. If you don't need the money, hold on to it (whatever it may be) - the future is yet uncharted.
    Steve

    'I only ever quote myself - except when I quote someone else' - me

    , plenty of , and , , triggered acoustics, , and a plethora of PA blah blah freakin blah...I mean does anyone care about the specifics of pedals, speakers, processors, hardware or anything that I'm using?? :confused: Hmmm, maybe this is an appropriate place to mention that I tried out a new cymbal stand the other day...

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    • #3
      Fer shure! In fact, I still have my acoustic kit, have been using it for some recording work, use my V-Pro kit exclusively for recording and live playing with my main band, and I'm in the middle of building (yes, building) a new custom maple kit as well. None will be sold any time soon. Just bought a new acoustic snare as well, since you can NEVER have too many snare drums. I think I've had one stolen and sold maybe 2 others over the years, but kept the rest. Love 'em all like family.

      The more gear you have, the more options you have in any situation, so by all means, keep the A drums!!!! Besides, keeping your A drum skills honed makes you a better and more flexible musician, too.

      -Danny
      -Danny

      Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life.

      Comment


      • #4
        My only regret in having a set of v's and two sets of a shells (one set of stands, cymbals and mics) is that they just sit in my basement unused. I have offered to let my bass player's son borrow my accoustic set to start learning how to play drums, but have not gotten an OK from "the mom" yet. I'd rather see somebody using them than have them just sit there. I've considered selling them on e-bay, but the old shells have more sentimental than economic value and I know that someday I'd regret getting rid of my true vintage 30 year old A-Zildjian cymbals for a few hundred bucks. I definitely agree that more gear is good, but it kils me to see them sitting around unused.

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        • #5
          Kinda the same boat. I've been using the V's for everything, having loaned my A's to my sister, so she could perhaps take up drumming.

          But she's given it up, and I will get them back tomorrow.

          Here's the rub: My V's have been at our practice space - 5 miles from home. I'm thinking of bringing them home so I can practice more, and use the A's just for rehearsals.

          The problem is that I haven't touched an acoustic kit for years now, and I'm afraid I'll sound like sh1t for quite a while!

          Anybody else feel the same?
          Immensely powerful yet with a liquid cat-quick elegance

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          • #6
            Don't sweat it! I go back and forth between V-Drums and acoustics every week, with about 1 day a week on the acoustics and 3 or 4 on the V's.

            The acoustics usually take a couple of minutes to get used to again... I find that the biggest adjustment for me is on the kick. With the settings on the V's and the use of the KD-7, I don't have to stomp with quite the velocity to get a full, loud kick the same as I do on the acoustics, and it takes me a minute to get my right foot dialed in!

            Just jump on and do it; kinda like riding a bike. Muscle memory will help you along.

            -Danny
            -Danny

            Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life.

            Comment


            • #7
              I could sell my acoustic drums 'cause my e-drums sound acoustic. That's the difference with Roland's Vdrums. They are perfect for home playing with your headphones on, but far too synthetic and processed for live and studio playing.

              The only exeption are my cymbals. Although the ddrum samples are perfect, adapting all playing techniques on cymbalpads isn't.
              Robert

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              • #8
                Originally posted by gingerbaker:
                [B]The problem is that I haven't touched an acoustic kit for years now, and I'm afraid I'll sound like sh1t for quite a while![B]
                I had the same concern, but after 4 hours of rehersal, it was like riding an old bike. Now it's a blast switching back and forth between the different instruments during the week. Heck guitar players do it all the time - why not us drummers?

                Driving a great song is better than driving a great car!!

                http://mysite.verizon.net/landin82/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by puttenvr:
                  That's the difference with Roland's Vdrums. They are perfect for home playing with your headphones on, but far too synthetic and processed for live and studio playing.
                  [/B]
                  Aw, not AGAIN, Putt! Yes, we know: ddrum is yadda yadda yadda, etc. Man, you are as bad as an ex-smoker sometimes!

                  Seriously, tho, whether you have Roland, Yamaha, Clavia, or brand-X e-drums, unless you are using triggered acoustics, there is nothing quite like putting serious wood to the skins. It is satisfying to me to play the acoustic drums occasionally on some sort of primal level that I can't explain.

                  Don't know how many of youse guys do hand-drumming gigs as well, but that falls squarely under the same heading. Just beating the hell out of something is very cathartic...

                  Why do without any of 'em? I say that if you are able, have the acoustics, electronics, drum machines, hand percussion, etc. Run the gamut, and be diverse. To me, at least, it makes drumming a bigger and more rewarding world.

                  Now, about Putt and those damned ddrums...

                  -Danny

                  -Danny

                  Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    To tell you the truth (and to be serious): I am missing my acoustic drums sometimes as well. But I still don't know whether this is something between my ears or a real missing of that cathartic thing you describe.

                    We are fed up with the fact that drums are made of wood and have a skin. And when we play on them there isn't only a sound; there's also some movement of air, which provides a specific feel and vibe. E-drums don't have that. Although their 2-dimensional sound in general is better than any acoustic drum in a practice room or on stage will sound.

                    Sigh...
                    Robert

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I agree that it makes good sense to keep our drumming tool-belts equipped with both A's and E's, if possible - especially since one doesn't fully replace the other.

                      I sold both my remaining sets of A's (I am keeping certain cymbals ) and for now, I am not looking back. For me, it was clear that they would continue to sit around unused for quite some time, and it made more sense for me to sell them. Both kits were relatively large and going forward that isn't what I need or want. A small basic acoustic setup may be in my future someday - it can always be augmented with my E's if I need more firepower. Hybrid kits are where its at now, anyway (IMHO).
                      E-drums: TD-20, RT-5S triggers on snare/toms, KD-7s, VH12, CY-14Cs, CY-15R, Pintech splash.
                      A-drums: Zickos (amber) w/ all Zildjians.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Putt, I couldn't agree with you more, man.

                        Jimmy, I follow your thinking as well... Once my new custom-built 4-piece kit is done, I may consider parting ways with the ol' Yamaha 10-piece monster. I usually only use it in a 6-piece configuration anyway, but I'll probably be adding another tom (10")to the 4-piece (kick, 13", 16"), and that (along with all the snare drums) should be sufficient for my needs -- along with all my snare drums! Can't get rid of those!

                        As it is now, that kit usually resides in a friend of mine's recording studio as sort of a "house kit," and I may just let him keep it on a more extended loan in exchange for some recording or whatever.

                        Happy Thanksgiving, folks...

                        -Danny
                        -Danny

                        Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I have a pretty big A kit that I'm thinking of combining with my E's. Just add a trigger to them and then you have the best of both worlds. Am I just missing something? I would only use the monster kit for practice. Wouldn't that eliminate all the issues with having the A's around?

                          Dave

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by puttenvr:
                            That's the difference with Roland's Vdrums. They are perfect for home playing with your headphones on, but far too synthetic and processed for live and studio playing.

                            Absolutely not !!!!!!!!

                            I have mentioned this before and I will stand behind my words and my experiment using ddrums and V’s. With outboard gear the V’s can hold their own against any edrum system (remember ddrums are based on a sampling technology and I am talking about internal sounds from a module, the ddrum system are basically a sampler and nothing else and samplers vs. modules are not in the same boat) Clavia and then some.

                            Putt, I do have to admire you for sticking to your guns, but in reality my TD-8 + my outboard gear will smoke the ddrums at any time and I had many gigs where the band using ddrums by themselves (no outboard gear) could not match my sounds and their clarity, genuineness and dynamics no matter what they tried to do. One guy said “Oh s-h-i-t I have to get more samples to get those sounds” and I said back to him “I guess you have to, but I don’t have to, I just have to tweak the sounds I already have in conjunction with my outboard gear ”. His response was “ Yeah but I can sample more sounds to have better sounds, and I said that is great but I am not using a sampler based system per say and I still smoke a ddrum system with only a true sound module with more perimeter to tweak then Clavia drums has to offer to take my sounds much further then ddrums could ever hope to”.

                            Needless to say the guy called me an American smart ass and I respectfully called him a tight-ass wanker and I took the liberty of dislocating his jaw after he knocked my snare down.

                            My point is, never say never; you don’t know what the others will have and how they use what they have. Ddrums are not a sound module per say, so comparing them to a true sound module is not prolific; it puts the Clavia drum products to shame.

                            ------------------
                            szvook

                            [This message has been edited by szvook (edited November 24, 2001).]

                            [This message has been edited by szvook (edited November 24, 2001).]

                            [This message has been edited by szvook (edited November 25, 2001).]
                            Studio

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Great thread, Tom....

                              I happen to be one of the fortunate few that has a kit for each of the three bands that I'm in (two acoustic and my V-kit), and, believe me, I count my blessings for that every gig! The V-drums are my first choice for live dates, but circumstances don't always allow me to use them.

                              But where having more than one kit really comes in handy is when that special gig comes along that finally allows you to bust out that Neil Peart-like wraparound setup .....
                              TD-30 / SPD-SX

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