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What should I do now?

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  • What should I do now?

    Ok, so I've got my set. I've gotten pretty confortable behind it. I want to know what you guys thing about the next step. I didn't play drums in high school (marching band) or anything so I don't really know any fundementals. Should I bother learning any? Or just crack away at some songs and pickup stuff as I go? Which is what I've been doing mostly. Listen to a song a few times, try to play along and learn a few cool fills. What do you think?

    I know I should have used the search engine...
    TD-6V Module, 3 PD-8s (soon to be 4), 2 CY-8s (soon to be 3), 1 CY-5, KD-8 with double Left footed Pearl Eliminators, FD-8 HH control.

  • #2
    Originally posted by EyeOne View Post
    Ok, so I've got my set. I've gotten pretty confortable behind it. I want to know what you guys thing about the next step. I didn't play drums in high school (marching band) or anything so I don't really know any fundementals. Should I bother learning any? Or just crack away at some songs and pickup stuff as I go? Which is what I've been doing mostly. Listen to a song a few times, try to play along and learn a few cool fills. What do you think?

    I know I should have used the search engine...
    Have you thought about taking lessons at all?

    I actually just got back in to drumming after a 14 year lay-off because vdrums have allowed me to have a kit in my house and to practice without bothering neighbors.

    I started back with lessons again and I think a better frame of mind than what I had as a teenager. I am much more interested in learning to play fundamentally and rudimentally and am putting the time in now.

    Do you read music at all? I have found it very helpful... learning to play Subdivisions (Rush) out of a book at the moment, and it's so much easier to learn a song when you can see it on paper.

    Anyway, my point... take lessons, learn the basics, build a strong foundation, and it will make everything else so much easier in the long run.

    Comment


    • #3
      Hi i1,

      I suggest a 2 pronged attack - 50% playing to enjoy yourself and 50% technique/rudiments etc.

      By spending the time on technique you will build your skill level which will make you a more marketable and versatile asset - this will also give you more confidence that you can "walk the talk" with other drummers.

      By spending the time on actually playing you will develop your co-ordination around the physical layout of your kit and most importantly you get to do what we all like best - playing the things.

      A good teacher can be a great help in giving you direction.

      Last, and very important - you also have the wealth of experience and cameraderie from this forum. Like tricky92 I also recently got back into drumming (after a 25 year layoff.....) and it has been really encouraging to chat on this forum with like minded people.

      Comment


      • #4
        It all depends on what you want to achieve.

        I gigged for 25 years and never had a lesson. Look, Listen and Learn technique. Not so easy these days cause you never know what your actually listening to. The only chance you got is to watch and listen to live recordings or bands, and matching up what you hear with what you see. If you just want to enjoy playing then this will do you.

        If you want to be pro then learn the rudiments, learn to read drum music, take lessons, and learn to play everything with feeling, and disciplin.

        Comment


        • #5
          FWIW - taking lessons and learning to read drum music early on were some of the things that really accelerated my development and built a good foundation. I have taken some lessons later on, but the ones I took early on (1st-2nd year of drumming) paid off much better.

          If I could do things over again, I might take more time to learn snare drum technique, but the lessons in basic rock syncopation and jazz independence were awesome.

          Edit: Playing with a band is also way up there on the list of things to do early on ...

          Steve
          Roland TD-12, 4-piece kit (very downsized) setup
          http://www.vdrums.com/forum/attachme...0&d=1180324146
          Gretsch New Classic, Yamaha & Ludwig snares
          Agop SE, Vintage A Zildjian, K, K Custom Dark, Sabian HHX Legacy
          DW Hardware

          Comment


          • #6
            Actually I have thought of lessons. The drummer at my church says he has a huge set at home and just loves to talk about drums. I've thought about asking him if he'd give me some lessons.

            Yes I can read music, I played trumpet in high school and college. But I'm used to trumpet music were I only have to play one note at a time. Drum music is a bit overwhelming to me. But I do have a music book with a CD that I should pick up again.

            My coordination is not so bad actually (at least I think so) mainly just because I play at home, in the car, at my desk at work, in church, while watching movies, and pretty much I'm not tied down (which is never). Just simple grooves, maybe through in some double bass. I just always have drums on the brain.

            I would just like to work on single stroke rolls, and double strokes, paradiddles, flams and such. All the stuff I miss by not being a drummer in marching band that would help me know.
            TD-6V Module, 3 PD-8s (soon to be 4), 2 CY-8s (soon to be 3), 1 CY-5, KD-8 with double Left footed Pearl Eliminators, FD-8 HH control.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by EyeOne View Post
              Actually I have thought of lessons. The drummer at my church says he has a huge set at home and just loves to talk about drums. I've thought about asking him if he'd give me some lessons.

              Yes I can read music, I played trumpet in high school and college. But I'm used to trumpet music were I only have to play one note at a time. Drum music is a bit overwhelming to me. But I do have a music book with a CD that I should pick up again.

              My coordination is not so bad actually (at least I think so) mainly just because I play at home, in the car, at my desk at work, in church, while watching movies, and pretty much I'm not tied down (which is never). Just simple grooves, maybe through in some double bass. I just always have drums on the brain.

              I would just like to work on single stroke rolls, and double strokes, paradiddles, flams and such. All the stuff I miss by not being a drummer in marching band that would help me know.
              FWIW - I played the euphonium/baritone in high school and college and if my experience was at all representative that kind of training definitely helps being able to read drum music. The notation for snare drum music as compared to rock beats as compared to jazz are kind of different, but you should be able to pick them all up no problem from a reading perspective. For rock music and jazz transcriptions, I find that you start to pick up meta patterns that make reading the music a lot easier over time where you are less focused on each individual note. I find it a little harder to find meta patterns when reading snare drum music where there is mostly one note at a time. That said, I think I started with a Haskell Harr snare drum method book that covers one rudiment at a time in the context of a short snare drum solo.

              This guy has some great lesson on YouTube covering a mix of rudiments and applications on the drum kit.

              http://www.youtube.com/user/MetroDrums

              Steve
              Roland TD-12, 4-piece kit (very downsized) setup
              http://www.vdrums.com/forum/attachme...0&d=1180324146
              Gretsch New Classic, Yamaha & Ludwig snares
              Agop SE, Vintage A Zildjian, K, K Custom Dark, Sabian HHX Legacy
              DW Hardware

              Comment


              • #8
                I just started back after having not played since 1985. I am starting over with the rudiments and basic drum beats on the set. I never learned to read drum music the first time and I really regret that decision. I am 37 now and I am going to do it right this time. I am amazed at how much time you can spend just practicing rudiments correctly on the snare. I have a very, very long road ahead of me. I am amazed at all the content on youtube. I dont see myself paying for lessons for awile. There is so much content on the web and on DVDs these days.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Definately take the time to master the rudiments! Stick technique is #1 IMO. Once you have it, you can apply it to ANY drum style and any drum kit. Learning the kit comes after learning your sticking. Any drum teacher worth salt will pull the snare out, make you stand in front of it with the rudiments on a sheet and put you to work before doing anything else.

                  I took lessons from 4th grade on through college (I'm 45 now). The first year of college my private teacher did NOTHING but snare with me. I touched a drum kit only on my own that year! I was mad at first, but he had a mission to really develop my chops and I thank him today.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I may take a pounding for this, but I think rudiments are being over-stressed. Ok, so don't get me wrong here. I know they are important and the best method for development etc...however, I think we need to seriously decide our future as a drummer. Obviously we all want to be Buddy or Neil or ________ (fill in the blank). Realistically, most of us aren't. Rudiments can be applied to the kit and they do translate well in most cases. I find it pretty easy to point out guys that have spent time in marching bands - its all staccato, rudimentary, and military - and not a feel I dig. I know, its not all marching or drum corps drummers. You can spend a ton of time on rudiments and developing every stroke to a T, but I can '1 e & a' (RLRL) as well as I can paradiddle (RLRR) and its all the same (or so) - 4 16th note hits accented wherever.

                    To me, learning different styles and incorporating those styles or beats is far more important and marketable. I don't know....I just find learning a flam-ratamacue and doing it well, over the course of weeks or months is not nearly as important, rewarding, fun, marketable, etc as learning a solid samba, disco, country, waltz, polka, etc and applying those rhythms with flexibility and ease.

                    Again, to each their own and not knocking the rudiment drummer. Heck, I wish I knew them better, but just not my priority at this point.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I actually agree with you omd.

                      Rudiments are something that every serious drummer should discipline themselves on from time to time. As well, drum corp or some form of marching band experience (for younger drummers) is also a wonderful way of really building a great discipline in your sticking and control.

                      However, I agree with omd that at some point in your learning, you must incorporate different styles of musical genre if you are to truly become a great drummer in your own right. Rudiments alone will not cut the cake.

                      I always tell my students to find a secondary style of music that moves them and drives them to feel that style. For me, it was a mix of fusion and funk.

                      At a early age, I was basically a Peart clone because it's all I bothered to focused on during those youth years. It was not until I found Bozzio, Calhoun, Purdy, Pocaro and others that I no longer felt I was stuck in one locked in style. I came to a point in my career that I had to be able to hop into any pocket if I wanted a great paycheck.

                      Honestly, when I look at drummers that have one single style, they strike me as the drummer that will never leave the garage. Look at "long-time" famous drummers out there. They have multiple styles they are comfortable with and can groove in any situation. They are the drummers that last.

                      To the OP - take what I say to heart. Consciously decide where you need to start. Grow from there. Personally, I'd spend time on one single pad/drum, working on my sticking, control and discipline. Never rush! You will get where you want to be when the time's right. When at the kit, concentrate more on fluidity and movement around the kit in a smooth manner. Think with your shoulders and wrists, but "feel the flow".
                      Last edited by Alan VEX; 06-04-08, 10:21 PM. Reason: I need to "discipline" my spelling. :D
                      Alan
                      ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                      website | youtube | facebook | group | newsletter | message | recommendations

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        You can't beat time in the saddle
                        (now how many oxymorons are in that line.....)

                        I always feel satisfied with the self-discipline after a session of rudiments, but nothing beats the feeling of improvising something that actually worked, and that requires you to be comfortable with the placement of your kit.

                        Call me self-indugent, but if we just "kept the beat" we'd just be drum machines.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Here's a classic rudiments book if you're interested.

                          Stick Control for the Snare Drummer

                          http://www.amazon.com/Stick-Control-...2624849&sr=8-2

                          It's like 11USD at GuitarCenter. I plan on picking one up with a Remo Practice Pad (possible future trigger pad).

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by oldmandrummer View Post
                            I may take a pounding for this, but I think rudiments are being over-stressed. Ok, so don't get me wrong here. I know they are important and the best method for development etc...however, I think we need to seriously decide our future as a drummer. Obviously we all want to be Buddy or Neil or ________ (fill in the blank). Realistically, most of us aren't. Rudiments can be applied to the kit and they do translate well in most cases. I find it pretty easy to point out guys that have spent time in marching bands - its all staccato, rudimentary, and military - and not a feel I dig. I know, its not all marching or drum corps drummers. You can spend a ton of time on rudiments and developing every stroke to a T, but I can '1 e & a' (RLRL) as well as I can paradiddle (RLRR) and its all the same (or so) - 4 16th note hits accented wherever.

                            To me, learning different styles and incorporating those styles or beats is far more important and marketable. I don't know....I just find learning a flam-ratamacue and doing it well, over the course of weeks or months is not nearly as important, rewarding, fun, marketable, etc as learning a solid samba, disco, country, waltz, polka, etc and applying those rhythms with flexibility and ease.

                            Again, to each their own and not knocking the rudiment drummer. Heck, I wish I knew them better, but just not my priority at this point.
                            Im with you here mate. To be a successful drummer in a band you dont need rudiments as such. OK paradiddles are very useful but for me they occured naturally while playing. I didnt spend hours practiceing them. Basically, your there to keep time and enhance the feel of the band. The better you do this, the better the band your in.

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