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What can I do to make my Left hand stronger with the drumstick?

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  • What can I do to make my Left hand stronger with the drumstick?

    I want to know what can I do to make my Left hand stronger with the drumstick? It feels so slow and not straight when I hit with it in my left hand. Like no power in it. Is their a technique to improve my hand.

  • #2
    You could try working on improving your grip strength with some of THESE.
    If you do get them, I'd recommend starting with the Sport or the Trainer. They are seriously hardcore grippers. Not many people can close a number two gripper and most have a hard time with the number one (easier).
    I'm a professional strongwoman and am the first woman ever to close a number 2.5 and I can say that working on my grip strength has definite benefits for my drumming.

    Also, if you have access to a pair of dumbells, do some wrist curls and reverse wrist curls with them. That will help too.

    Comment


    • #3
      You want to focus on the muscles that are important to drumming in this aspect. I have my students do simple rudiments as they hang their wrist over the edge of the bed. This is an old drum corp trick to building the wrist and forearm muscles. It's not something that will happen overnight. It's fairly easy, but it gets the job done. Focus your stick tips in one place in the air as an imaginary head. You must dedicate time each day to doing this. I ask my student to do this for 30 minutes a day for 90 days and they usually see a vast improvement in control and strength. Keep in mind that you cannot do this alone and expect results. Implement it into your daily routine and continue working on your rudimental control during your regular playing as well. You'll be surprised at how much your control improves with this little excersize.
      Alan
      ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      website | youtube | facebook | group | newsletter | message | recommendations

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      • #4
        I have taught myself to do day to day things with my left hand, for example I can hammer a nail and use a screw driver with my left hand. But there is no substitute for a practice pad...
        My Kit
        http://www.vdrums.com/forum/attachme...2&d=1257067362

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by SuperPuss View Post
          I'm a professional strongwoman and am the first woman ever to close a number 2.5
          First in the world?

          I find a good bit of air drumming helps with strength, and wrist snaps.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by thiscocks View Post
            First in the world? .....
            Yep

            Being a relative rookie to drumming though, I'm learning a lot from the more experienced drummers here.

            Comment


            • #7
              Just to add my little bit.
              I stopped drumming in my teens, had a break (for 27 years!) and since I came back to it my technique and speed with both hands is so much better.
              I can only put this down to strength of wrist/forearm.
              In the time between playing I did a lot of weight training, plus my job calls for me to use my gripping muscles a lot on a daily basis (squeezing out wet cloths etc) and this has given me the necessary strength I feel.
              I was quite concerned that I would struggle when restarting playing, as I used to suffer badly with grip when I was young, but that concern left me after a week of playing again.
              So.... exercise the wrists and forearms, as has been suggested, and you be fine I'm sure.

              Comment


              • #8
                a professional drummer who i know has been playing for 50 years plus recommends a simple excercise - you hold both sticks in one hand each in turn (with the butt ends flat together about a hand's width) and spin them clockwise then anticlockwise, backwards and forwards very fast, like a propeller, which he claims is a good warm up excercise and strengthens the wrists and forearms. also he recommends practicing rudiments on a hard pad every day.
                http://vdrums.com/forum/showthread.p...760#post301760
                :cool:
                ;)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by mystic fred View Post
                  a professional drummer who i know has been playing for 50 years plus recommends a simple excercise - you hold both sticks in one hand each in turn (with the butt ends flat together about a hand's width) and spin them clockwise then anticlockwise, backwards and forwards very fast, like a propeller, which he claims is a good warm up excercise and strengthens the wrists and forearms. also he recommends practicing rudiments on a hard pad every day.
                  LOL That's my warm up routine! Seriously! It's good too.
                  Alan
                  ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  website | youtube | facebook | group | newsletter | message | recommendations

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                  • #10
                    i like to play flatflams (unisons) until my left hand can't keep
                    up with my right.. at this speed play continues isolated 16ths
                    LLLL or triplets LLL with metronome every day, untill you can
                    start adding bpm's. focus on both wrist and finger playing.
                    Audio | Video | Roland/Yamaha e-kit | Sonor/Gretsch a-kit | Zildjian/Sabian/Ufip/Meinl cymbals

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                    • #11
                      "Stick Control" book, with a metronome, starting extremely slow. You want to make sure no matter what the rudiment is that it sounds as smooth as straight single strokes. You can also try using a pillow as the drum pad while practicing these.

                      Another exercise that worked well for me is to practice slowly ~6 inches above the practice surface, and just use down strokes, meaning you do not raise your hand before the downstroke.

                      Adam

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                      • #12
                        Personally, I've never been a proponent of grippers for developing anything related to drumming. No, I am not at all an expert in muscle growth nor function...but I agree that there really is no substitute for constant practice. Take a look at the arms of many popular drummers that have great power and speed - very few of them are what we'd typically call "muscular". Most of the drummers that you see in drum corps lines are usually pretty skinny. If you use some form of resistance training (weights, gripper, etc.) and it works for you, more power to you. I just believe that constantly working the hand and practicing will probably produce more effective results.

                        MCM mentioned doing everyday activities with your left hand...that was also a recommendation from a drum corps instructor that we had. For us it wasn't to build up strength as much as it was to get the mind used to doing things with the left hand and therefore being able to lead off the left as well.

                        When it came to developing pure speed, we actually practiced not on hard surfaces but on soft surfaces...and I don't mean a soft rubber....I mean something that will actually absorb the impact, like a pillow. There are actually some practice pads made with a soft pillow side. You eventually develop the muscles that allow you to play with speed without depending on the rebound. We used this along with an exercise that was similar to what Alan described...we played traditional grip so it worked just a little differently, but the concept was the same.

                        And finally, don't just thwack as fast as you can...also develop proper technique.

                        That's my $0.02.
                        Stick twirling - because you obviously have mastered all other aspects of drumming already, right?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by dschrammie View Post
                          Personally, I've never been a proponent of grippers for developing anything related to drumming...

                          MCM mentioned doing everyday activities with your left hand...that was also a recommendation from a drum corps instructor that we had. For us it wasn't to build up strength as much as it was to get the mind used to doing things with the left hand and therefore being able to lead off the left as well.

                          When it came to developing pure speed, we actually practiced not on hard surfaces but on soft surfaces...and I don't mean a soft rubber....I mean something that will actually absorb the impact, like a pillow. There are actually some practice pads made with a soft pillow side. You eventually develop the muscles that allow you to play with speed without depending on the rebound. We used this along with an exercise that was similar to what Alan described...we played traditional grip so it worked just a little differently, but the concept was the same.
                          +1

                          Originally posted by almazza View Post
                          "Stick Control" book, with a metronome, starting extremely slow. You want to make sure no matter what the rudiment is that it sounds as smooth as straight single strokes. You can also try using a pillow as the drum pad while practicing these.

                          Another exercise that worked well for me is to practice slowly ~6 inches above the practice surface, and just use down strokes, meaning you do not raise your hand before the downstroke.

                          Adam
                          +1
                          Alan
                          ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                          website | youtube | facebook | group | newsletter | message | recommendations

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I'm still a beginner but I never noticed my left hand (non dominant) lagging behind my right hand.

                            I do rock climb in a gym regularly which probably explains it. Climbing works your forearms and finger strength like no other exercise. Not bad for your core strength either. But then I do work out at a regular gym too so that should improve forearms a tad. Oh yeah, I play piano and have dabbled in guitar so that's probably helped.

                            Hmmm... I guess my point is no need to train in isolation. Maybe find other activies that work forearms and fingers?
                            Last edited by csciguy8; 04-25-08, 04:31 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by almazza View Post
                              "Stick Control" book, with a metronome, starting extremely slow. You want to make sure no matter what the rudiment is that it sounds as smooth as straight single strokes. You can also try using a pillow as the drum pad while practicing these.

                              Another exercise that worked well for me is to practice slowly ~6 inches above the practice surface, and just use down strokes, meaning you do not raise your hand before the downstroke.

                              Adam
                              -in addition...try a "MoonGel Pad". Basically a flat circle that has almost no rebound. They also make drum muffles out of the same "squishy" material:

                              http://www.rtom.com/

                              Rock on brother!

                              E
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