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Does anyone suffer from joint pain in their arms from playing Edrums?

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  • #31
    As far as something medicinal that may help the pain, I've never tried this myself, but I have heard CBD MD Gummies is quite effective in some people.

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    • #32
      [QUOTE=bpaluzzi;n1238686]Sure

      Disagree with this. From experience, getting beginning students to control the rebound and get a consistent, controlled downstroke is a challenge (and is exactly what exercises like 8-on-a-hand are for)

      Disagree with this -- the point of single-hand exercises is to develop technique. Ignoring downstrokes on these means you'll never get them perfected for more complex exercises / playing.
      IF your intention with 8 on a hand is to teach control on down strokes then play the down strokes. My intention with 8 on a hand is developing a relaxed techique that maximises rebound. Don't take 8 on a hand literally, any single height rudiment such as singles, doubles or triples.

      Disagree with this. Controlled downstrokes are the absolute key to fast techniques in anything other than hand-to-hand singles, and even then, when you stop, it should be a downstroke.
      There is no disagreement here, I will remind you for the third time that we are ONLY discussing single strokes and double strokes or exercises where there is one stick height. The thing we disagree with is that you feel you should mix down strokes and free strokes and I say you should practice free strokes when practicing free strokes and practice down strokes on things where down strokes are actually used, for example paradiddles. As I said downstrokes don't translate to playing fast single strokes. That's physics but you already know that, your just misunderstanding. I'd like to see you play singles with one hand at 200BPM as down strokes, impossible.

      STRONG disagree with this. That's the whole point of an exercise like 8 on a hand.
      If YOUR point is to practice downstrokes then sure, but my point is to develop a relaxed, fast, smooth hand techinque that maximises the rebound.. Downstrokes can be practiced on literally any other rudiment or practice 8 on a hand with a downstroke as well. But you should at least try it before dismissing it.


      Disagree with this - the final note on a hand SHOULD be a downstroke, and forcing that to a downstroke is itself bad technique.
      I don't understand here, you say that it should end on a downstroke but then say that forcing it to a downstroke is bad techinque?

      I think you are stuck on the idea of eight on a hand. That is not important. What I mean is that you should practice free strokes for developing good loose hands. When you learn free strokes you learn how to play out of the drum. Playing down strokes is obviously also important but mixing them in, if the intention with the exercise is to develop a good loose technique where you maximise the rebound with free strokes then playing a downstroke at the end is counter productive (for teaching that specific thing).

      If you want to teach down strokes that is another thing entirely and not what I'm discussing (and not disagreeing that you shouldn't teach that).
      Last edited by frankzappa; 10-01-20, 06:20 PM.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by frankzappa View Post

        IF your intention with 8 on a hand is to teach control on down strokes then play the down strokes. My intention with 8 on a hand is developing a relaxed techique that maximises rebound. Don't take 8 on a hand literally, any single height rudiment such as singles, doubles or triples.

        ...

        If YOUR point is to practice downstrokes then sure, but my point is to develop a relaxed, fast, smooth hand techinque that maximises the rebound.. Downstrokes can be practiced on literally any other rudiment or practice 8 on a hand with a downstroke as well. But you should at least try it before dismissing it.
        But that's not what you originally said -- you said that any exercise using a single stroke height should have the opposite hand up in the air. Which is what I've disagreed with.

        Originally posted by frankzappa View Post
        you ’should’ teach all exercises that have one stick height such as single strokes, double strokes etc. as free strokes that start and end at the top and not resting the stick in the down position when the other hand is playing.

        Originally posted by frankzappa View Post

        I don't understand here, you say that it should end on a downstroke but then say that forcing it to a downstroke is bad techinque?
        Whoops, yeah, that was a typo. Should have said "forcing it to an upstroke"




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        • #34
          Originally posted by Vectron View Post
          As far as something medicinal that may help the pain, I've never tried this myself, but I have heard CBD MD Gummies is quite effective in some people.
          *** This is dangerous advice. I cannot speak strongly enough against this approach. ***

          As I wrote somewhere earlier in this thread, pain is the body's way of indicating damage or impending damage. If you mask pain, you won't get critical signals, which means you may damage your body and/or do more damage to existing injury. Do not ignore and/or mask pain. Instead, stop playing and deal with the cause of the pain. In my own drumming career playing and teaching, except situations of existing injury, 99.9% of the time the kind of pain described by the OP is technique-oriented and requires changes in technique. And indeed, in situations of existing injury, provided the injury isn't entirely incompatible with drumming, the solution is almost always periods of healing (non-playing) and changes in technique to avoid aggravating the injury or re-injury.
          Last edited by TangTheHump; 10-02-20, 01:58 PM.

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          • #35
            OMG THIS... if you are experiencing pain YOU ARE DOING IT WRONG
            Module: TD-9v2. Kick: KD-8, pedal: Iron Cobra with KAT Silent Strike beater. Hats: VH-10 with Tama Swivel hi-hat stand. Snare: PD-120. Toms: 3 x PD-80R. Crashes: CY-12RC, CY-14. Ride: CY-15R. Aux: BT-1.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by bpaluzzi View Post

              But that's not what you originally said -- you said that any exercise using a single stroke height should have the opposite hand up in the air. Which is what I've disagreed with.

              Well you have to think of the context it was said. The thread is about pain which indicates that he may be using the wrong technique for which the obvious solution is to practice free strokes. You can use any kind of pattern or sticking with one stick height. You can use paradiddles as well if you play them at one stick height. As long as the goal is to practice not playing into the drum but out of it.

              Also, the thing about ending in the up position is when you practice single, double and triple strokes basically. I obviously didn't mean that you should practice that way for everything the rest of your life.

              Whoops, yeah, that was a typo. Should have said "forcing it to an upstroke"
              Are we talking 8 on a hand? There is no upstroke in 8 on a hand. You are actually "forcing" the last stroke to a downstroke (or just catching it immediately after it bounces back). The natural thing is to let it bounce back to the up position like the other 7 strokes. I feel like maybe I should make a video about this as I'm not sure you understand what I mean. You don't actually bring the sticks up with free strokes, they should bounce back all the way by them selves.
              Last edited by frankzappa; 10-03-20, 03:54 AM.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by frankzappa View Post
                The thread is about pain, which indicates that he (Ed: the OP) may be using the wrong technique for which the obvious solution is to practice... (snip) ...not playing into the drum but out of it... (snip) ...ending in the up position... (snip).
                ^ See above. Edited to highlight the essence of what may need to be practiced. Use whatever stroke you like, as long as it starts away from the drum, becomes passive and relaxed at impact to avoid impact traveling into the body, and rebounds passively while ending in a relaxed state away from the drum.

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                • #38
                  Playing hard on edrums is not necessary. So why do it?
                  www.myspace.com/tongueingrooveTd 20 Purple Fade V Session Cy15, 2x Cy14, Cy8, Asi+ Crown k2 amps, BBE max. Legion 15's, Madison 18 subs, Tama,Yamaha hardware.
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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by SIZZLE View Post
                    Playing hard on edrums is not necessary. So why do it?
                    That's a reasonable question. The answer is that while I do not recommend playing unnecessarily hard, none-the-less, a full range of dynamics often requires a range of different strokes, some harder than others. And, if you're playing both e-drums and acoustic drums, then it's useful to transfer technique from one to the other.

                    Acoustic drummers also make the mistake that playing louder requires playing harder. That's not necessarily true. You can get plenty of volume with a full height Moeller stroke yet the actual hardness of the stroke is lighter than one may think. The condition of heads, how you tune, and how you approach and release strokes all have huge affect on attack, resonance, and overall tone, volume and projection.

                    The human body, unamplified, will never keep up with loud, amplified instruments, such as electric guitars and electric keyboards. So, if you need to be heard over loud instruments, the answer isn't to hit harder. Once you reach a certain point of loudness, hitting harder causes unnecessary wear on the body and chokes the drum heads, both things that reduce output. Therefore, the other musicians must reduce volume to balance with the drums or the drums must be reinforced with amplification (or more amplification if the drums are already amplified). Personally, my preference is the former rather than the later. I hate having to play drums at continuous maximum output to keep up with musicians who are too loud; playing this way risks damage to the body and to the drums, is unmusical, and limits range of expression.
                    Last edited by TangTheHump; 10-09-20, 12:34 PM.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by bpaluzzi View Post

                      Disagree whole-heartedly, but that's the joy of opinions
                      Yep thats what makes the world go round. Its not all about love and money

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