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Need some pro beginner tips

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  • Need some pro beginner tips

    so I finally got into drums after 3 years of not having the courage to take the first step.

    I take a drum lesson once a week, just got my drum sticks (those Nova 5A) and I'm getting the Realfeel 6 inch practice pad in 2 days... I wanted some tips..How did you manage to improve quickly, I get to play on a real set once-twice a week.

    So maybe some youtube vids, how to start, beginner exercises... Literally anything that helped you get gud.

    Thanks in advance )


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    Last edited by rohanjadhav; 06-05-20, 11:42 PM.

  • #2
    If you are having drum lessons then make sure you get enough material for the amount of time you will practice through the week. The way to get better fast is to practice, practice, practice. No short cuts to getting good. Drumeo is a good site and there are plenty of others out there. Playing along to music is always good as that is the whole point. Also try to team up with musicians who are similar level to you or better.
    Roland TD30 module on TD20 kit SD3 with various kits. Pearl Masters Kit, Yamaha 9000RC original natural wood finish. Cymbals from Zildgian Pasite and Sabian. Loads of percussion bits. Cubase and Wavelab always current versions.

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    • #3
      You don't get good quickly. If you expect quick you will get frustrated and fail.

      Practice the way pros tell you. Patiently, often, and with a plan.

      Practice the core rudiments to a slow click and do not move up to the next speed until you have them nailed - even strokes and perfect timing.

      Practice the physical techniques needed to play well - hands, grip and feet.

      Learn how to set up your kit to fit your body - throne height so your knees aren't above your hips, thwn snare drum height so you can play it comfortably with your arms at your side, then kick drum and hi-hat so your feet aren't too far in front or behind your knees, then toms so you can reach them without stretching, and lastly cymbals so they are in reach, not too high, not too angled, and not getting in the way of the drums.

      And with all that in mind, play as often as possible and enjoy learning no matter how fast or slow it goes!
      Roland TM-6 Pro with Roland RT30 triggers and PD-8 for hybrid acoustic, and Yamaha PCY130S cymbals for all electronic. Plus all the acoustic stuff.

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      • #4
        Yea as mkok and Kev said. Dont get yourself bogged down with praticing rudiments etc cause there is no short cut to being good.
        Every-so-often, just play along to stuff you like

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        • #5
          I think practicing covers until you can count your way through with just a metronome is good because at that point you can actually play the song. I use song lessons from Rob Litten of drumstheword.com to learn the parts.
          Ludwig Accent 5 piece kit | UFO Drums ebridges, 3 ply mesh heads and rim protectors | Yamaha PCY135 on Ludwig stand with DIY hall effect sensor | Yamaha PCY155 ride | DIY Pintech 2 zone crashes with Goedrums piezo's - Myrk membranes| eDRUMin(s) | Cantabile VST host | Superior Drummer 2 and Jamstix kits | Alto TS115a monitors | IK ARC 3

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          • #6
            +1 on the frequency of practicing. I managed to learn the basics relatively quickly because I learnt with acquaintances that lived nearby, and could go there 3 times a week. The more you'll practice, the more you'll learn, and the less time passes inbetween playing sequences, the less you'll forget!

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            • #7
              Sounds like you got yourself a drum teacher, which is a great way to start.

              Online lesson sites such as Drumeo.com and Mikeslessons.com are cheaper than private lessons but you’re on your own a bit more. Still better than trying to do it all yourself through YouTube. There’s so much content out there, it’s hard to know which instruction is right for you.

              With that said, here’s a few YouTube videos appropriate for beginners:

              https://youtu.be/53jDwKQbm1U

              https://youtu.be/JWJGc5Z7_LU

              https://youtu.be/tQgsf6S4T1E

              Your best bet is to check out videos by Drumeo, Stephen Taylor, or Mike Johnston.

              And the book Stick Control is a good place to start learning basic sticking. The exercises start on page 5; I would spend a lot of time on this page before moving on.

              https://bateriaipercussiovalls.files...ge-l-stone.pdf

              Last edited by Bahstan; 07-31-20, 10:40 PM.

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              • #8
                +1 to all of the above advice. Lots of good tips there.

                Be patient, you won't become good at drumming overnight. It takes time and practice and repetition to become really good at your craft.
                There are more resources available to you than ever before, make use of them. Whether that is printed material, or Youtube, or forums.
                Practice exercises on all 4 limbs. Don't just learn rudiments on your hands, learn them with your feet for example. Practice leading with both sides to become really even between left and right.
                Listen to a wide variety of musical styles. Don't just listen to the genre that you like and stick to that. The more versatile you are, and the more styles you can play to, the more musical you can be when playing to your 'favourite' genre.

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