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From Motorcycles to Drums?

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  • From Motorcycles to Drums?

    Hi, I need help, I'm 67 and several years ago I had a sub arrachnoid brain haemorrhage and when I was better I learnt to ride a bike to go 4000miles across the coast of Britain to raise money for the hospital that saved my life. Only problem was I loved it, but my son hates me riding, so I said to him ' Wait til you see my next hobbyhobby'. Which is....... drumming yay
    But..... it's a secret from my son, I've given myself a year to learn and I want to go to where he plays with his band in Cardiff and ask if I can have a go, then I want to really go for it and watch his face, I forgot to say he's a drummer.
    So I'm asking all you drummers, is it realistic? Can it be done? Don't forget I'm old and learning takes me forever, but I never give up.
    Thanks to any of you that answer, don't forget I'd like any beginners tips too. X

  • #2
    Hello, welcome to the forum! Bravo for the kind gestures, and for the will and perseverance in doing that bike thing. If you put that kind of persistant effort in drumming for a year, chances are you'll not only have a big supprise for your son, but also get good enough to take it up as a regular hobby. Just try to have regular lessons with a willing teacher, the online stuff is usefull but not as effective for beggginers.
    Cheers!
    Last edited by MilosDrummer; 07-05-19, 05:43 PM.
    •A kits: Mapex Saturn ltd. Mapex Meridian, Ludwig and Pearl snares, Paiste, Anatolian, DW5002TW•
    •Roland TD-12 brain, SPD-SX, Roland RT triggers•
    •Ship kits: TD-12KV, TD-30K, TD-50K•

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    • #3
      i agree.. and you should search some videos on youtube 'health benefits of drumming' or 'drumming and brain' ..
      doesn't matter what you will achieve ..you can have a huge benefit any way.. ..good luck..
      | Diy Roland/Yamaha e-kit | Sonor/Gretsch a-kit | Zildjian/Sabian/Ufip cymbals

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      • #4
        Mate you get out of it what you put into it, and its not as easy as it looks. Saying that though, to get to the level you want to be at in one year is possible. I am 70 and been playing since 1963 and I am still learning stuff even now. I play along to stuff on the radio (through the computer), or the CD player and I play along to numbers I don't know, just to test my improvisation skills, and that for me is the fun now. No point in playing along to things I know, no fun in that. One year and you will still be a novice but should have a good idea of what you are doing. Get some basic lessons and play along to stuff you like, not to fast though or slow, and have fun, and don't get too serious over it.

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        • #5
          Plus 1 to John bs suggestion. Find a good teacher and get some lessons to get the basic technique and avoid the wrong techniques. It makes a big difference especially when youre older. Good luck with your quest!
          Equipment: TD-30KV, DW9000 hardware, ROC-N-SOC Throne, Behringer ULTRATONE K3000FX Amp, JBL EON 615 Powered Speaker, Yamaha MG06X. 1965 Ludwig Super Classic. Black diamond pearl. Zildjian K Custom Dark cymbals, DW 7000 hardware, DW 9000 kick pedal.

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          • #6
            Go for it. Make sure you practice to a metronome and record yourself regularly to see where you are. Its easy to think your great when playing and then listen to a recording and realise you may not be as good as you think. Keep at it
            Roland TD30 module on TD20 kit SD3 with various kits. Pearl Masters Kit, Yamaha 9000RC original natural wood finish. Cymbals from Zildgian Pasite and Sabian. Loads of percussion bits. Cubase and Wavelab always current versions.

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            • #7
              Search for 'drumless songs', (lots for free on Youtube), and pick the types you like and some that challenge you.
              It'll hold your interest longer and they can be just as useful as a metronome.

              Experiment until you get your edrums to a height and distance you find comfortable for extended playing time.
              A comfortable drum throne and correct height is pretty important, too.
              You don't want to stretch or strain to hit the cymbals.
              Adjust so it's comfortable to reach the bass drum and hi hat pedals.

              Sticks: I like a light stick, like a 7A, but sometimes I like to switch to a heavier, longer stick like a 7A jazz type stick. 5B's are popular, too.
              Maybe go to a music shop and ask to hold/heft several sizes if you haven't zero'd in on a favorite weight/length yet.

              Don't overdo it when it comes to volume -especially with headphones.
              It's way too easy to play music kinda loud and then when you mix in the drums, all the sudden, it's blasting.
              It's fun, but your ears are going to get tired quickly, so you'll turn it up even more. Bad.
              As a long time rider, your ears are probably missing some frequencies anyway.

              You gave yourself a goal and a deadline, so I think you'll have to play at least 3-4 hours almost every day.
              But really, it has to be fun. If it is, then you will probably impress him a year or so from now.
              Play on, man.

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              • #8
                Good on you. For playing along with your son's band, you can get away with drumming to 90% of popular music with two beats, both of which have bass drum on 1 and 3, and snare on 2 and 4. One is a straight feel (straight eighth notes on the hi-hat), one is a shuffle (eighth note shuffle on the hi-hat). You can easily learn these. Getting them down with a good feel is another thing, but a year is enough time, and enough time to learn a bunch of other stuff besides. Enjoy
                Roland TD9 (KD8, FD9) > Scarlett 6i6 > imac, Superior Drummer 3, Logic // Yamaha DTX Multi12 (KT10, HH65, TP100) > Scarlett 2i4 > macbook, SD3 // Zendrum EXP > Stompblock, macbook, SD3 // Yamaha HS7s, Yamaha DBR10, ATH-M30x // A-Kits: DIY compact kit, Mapex Meridian // Cymbals: Zildjian Ks, some As & Sabians & ...

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                • #9
                  Thanks all for giving me some useful advice, it seems it's going to be a hard slog, but I'm up for it and more importantly I'm enjoying it.x

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                  • #10
                    Definitely, I have used Drumeo (online course) for just over a year with 30 mins to 1hr practice every day without fail and I've been playing live regularly for 6 months now. I keep it simple when playing live and people seem to think it's pretty solid. With a good real teacher I suspect you'll progress even quicker.

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                    • #11
                      If you can get hold of your sons band playlist, you can pick out something you like and concentrate on playing it. You have just got to hope then that thy don't go and change their playlist and drop that number lol.

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                      • #12
                        Riding requires 4 limb independence (I rode for a few years too) so you already must have SOME coordination.

                        Get a teacher for sure. The trick is to NOT "really go for it" off the start. get your groove and timing down. If you can play a simple rock beat for a whole song you can play almost any song. People will hate a drummer that blazes chops and fills but cant keep time, more than a drummer that keeps good time and doesn't do a ton of flash.

                        As you improve add some flash.

                        1 year is a decent amount of time. If you practice every day you will have massive improvements

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by scottyp View Post
                          Riding requires 4 limb independence (I rode for a few years too) so you already must have SOME coordination.

                          Get a teacher for sure. The trick is to NOT "really go for it" off the start. get your groove and timing down. If you can play a simple rock beat for a whole song you can play almost any song. People will hate a drummer that blazes chops and fills but cant keep time, more than a drummer that keeps good time and doesn't do a ton of flash.

                          As you improve add some flash.

                          1 year is a decent amount of time. If you practice every day you will have massive improvements

                          I still ride motorcycles better than I drum. I will keep up the practice on both though.
                          "It makes sense if you dont think about it"

                          Mimic Pro, SPD-SX, 2-QSC K-10s, K-sub, Yamaha mixer, and a bunch of other expensive cool things!

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                          • #14
                            Good stuff
                            Go for it. Practice and have a lot of fun.

                            along with training and studying the basics as others recommended. I would try to figure out which songs would be special for your son and that can be played with his band. Check which ones are easier for you so you can try them after getting some confidence. There are youtube videos showing the drums tab along with the song.
                            In the beginning you will suffer a bit with coordination, mixing the beats, getting stuck, etc. All normal. Don't give up as this is just temporary and part of the fun.
                            Practice, practice, practice.
                            For sure you will be able to play some songs, and it will be special for both of you.

                            Cheers
                            Ronaldo B.

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