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Two Open-Closed Hihats-Pattern: E-Drums make this possible!

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  • Two Open-Closed Hihats-Pattern: E-Drums make this possible!

    Hi, I want to present a great sounding 2 Open Hihats-Pattern with a video. The idea gave me the "Neue Deutsche Welle"-Song "Hubert Kah - Wenn Der Mond Die Sonne Berührt"


    original: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N8is2...



    Hubert Kah - Wenn Der Mond Die Sonne Berührt... - 2 Open Hihats-Pattern - Software Drumming

    An example of my Hihat-"Keep It Unreal"-Sound (consists of 3 different hat sounds : the pedal "chick" is again layered with a different model) and an ingenious pattern from the song. Really inspiring! And after all only possible with E-drums!

    I use Toontrack drum software and Cubase DAW for e-drumming.

  • #2
    Not to take away from your creativity and fine drumming, but I don't see why this pattern cannot be played with a single hi-hat. I tried following the foot lifts needed and they are feasible with a single hi-hat pedal and single pair of hats. Ditto for the subdivisions between lifts; they all fit easily on a single pair of hats. Having the two hats most definitely creates a different texture, and it looks like the lifts on your right hats are done with actual foot lifts whereas the lifts on your left hats are performed with velocity, making the pattern easier and more fluid to play. But really, I don't see why this pattern cannot be played on a single pair of hats, either acoustic or electronic. The foot lifts are tougher with a single pair of hats, but they are quite doable. Am I missing something?

    At any rate, very nice drumming! You play this pattern smoothly and effortlessly, with a funky, greasy lilt. Well done! I enjoyed that! :-)

    Last edited by TangTheHump; 04-19-17, 09:23 PM.

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    • #3
      Hey, thanks for your answer

      Both hihats (the one on CY5 and the other on the sample pad) are controlled with the one hihat control pedal and yes, in this pattern I play mixed foot technique: "heel down" for the right hats and kind of heel up or foot up for the left hats (or you can say "heel down" for the eighth notes durations and "heel up" for sixteenth notes durations of the open state - ...always depends on the pattern).

      The point with two hihats is the attractive sound. At the end of the video I play the pattern on only one hihat in order to show the difference... (the foot lifts are exactly the same with a single pair of hats)

      So if you want this attractive sound character you'll have to use two hihat-sounds.
      Last edited by Nick74; 04-25-17, 04:27 PM.

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      • #4
        Nick74,

        Hey, thanks for the follow-up! :-)

        I watched your video again and downloaded it this time, so that I can try this pattern fully myself. I didn't watch your hi-hat foot pedal before and now, after you explained how the pedal controls both hats, I see that your foot matches the same lifts I transcribed. Very cool! Your playing is really solid and it's a pleasure to listen to your drumming. Thanks for sharing! It's inspiring watching your creativity.

        The pattern you are playing reminds me of an exercise I was practicing recently. Take the serial permutations of sixteenth note lifts (meaning, on the beat, a sixteenth after the beat, the "and" of the beat, and a sixteenth before the next downbeat) and rotate them every two beats. Using a simple, eighth note rock pattern (1 and 3 on the bass drum, 2 and 4 on the snare drum, and eighth notes on the hi-hat), every first and third beat has a different hi-hat lift. Thus, it takes two bars to go through the four permutations.

        Notated with stick playing sixteenth note open and close notes, in addition to the eighth notes of the rock pattern, as follows:

        Code:
        Drum Key:
        ^ = Accents
        h = Hi-hat Stick
        o = Hi-hat Foot Open
        c = Hi-hat Foot Closed
        s = Snare Drum
        b = Bass Drum
        
        
        ^    ^    ^^   ^
        1e&a 2e&a 3e&a 4e&a
        hhh  h h  hhh  h h
        oc         oc
             s         s
        b         b
        
        
        ^ ^  ^    ^  ^ ^
        1e&a 2e&a 3e&a 4e&a
        h hh h h  h hh h h
          oc         o c
             s         s
        b         b
        I play the lifts two different ways: (1) with a stick notes playing on the open and close of the lifts, or (2) with stick notes only on the open of the lifts, leaving only the hi-hat pedal to play the close notes (that is, unless a close falls on one of the eighth notes of the rock pattern, in which case a stick plays the close as well).

        Another variation, when the lifts occur on the downbeats or the "and" of the beats, play them as eighth note lifts. Meaning, play an eighth note open and close with the hi-hat pedal. Conversely, when the lifts occur on the "e" and "a" sixteenth notes, play them as sixteenth note lifts. Meaning, play a sixteenth note open and close with the hi-hat pedal.

        Actually, a much more challenging variation I've not tried yet is... when the lifts occur on the downbeats or the "and" of the beats, play them as sixteenth note lifts. Conversely, when the lifts occur on the "e" and "a" sixteenth notes, play them as eighth note note lifts. This means the open and close footwork crosses eighth notes of the rock pattern and occurs across beats for the final permutation. Also, if you play stick strokes on the open and the eighth notes of the rock pattern, you end up with a four note grouping on the second permutation and a five note grouping on the fourth permutation. Cool exercise! I must try this! This looks as follows:

        Code:
        Drum Key:
        ^ = Accents
        h = Hi-hat Stick
        o = Hi-hat Foot Open
        c = Hi-hat Foot Closed
        s = Snare Drum
        b = Bass Drum
        
        
        ^    ^    ^^   ^
        1e&a 2e&a 3e&a 4e&a
        hhh  h h  hhhh h h
        oc         o c
             s         s
        b         b
        
        
        ^ ^  ^    ^  ^ ^
        1e&a 2e&a 3e&a 4e&a
        h hh h h  h hh hhh
          oc         o  c
             s         s
        b         b
        You can get a lot of mileage out of this simple pattern! It's great for working on body balance, balance between the feet, and ensuring that the timing of your eighth note versus sixteenth note lifts are accurate, clean, and smooth. It's easy to kill the groove if the duration of your lifts isn't spot on. Oops. Maybe I'm being a drum geek and sharing too much detail. I love working on this kind of stuff because it opens up aspects of your independence, body balance, and musicality in numerous ways.

        Thanks again for the follow-up and for the dual hi-hat pattern.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by TangTheHump View Post
          Thanks again for the follow-up and for the dual hi-hat pattern.

          Very nice post with detailed information.
          Last edited by Chris K; 06-14-17, 05:06 PM.
          Regards
          Chris K

          DW Collector Drum, Roland TD-15\VST Powered, Spd-SX, Yamaha Pmc1 midi brain

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