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TD-4 - Help dampening sound

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  • TD-4 - Help dampening sound

    Hello, I was hoping someone can give me some advice with a noise problem.

    I have a Roland TD-4 set (only the snare is mesh, the toms are rubber pads).

    It's set up in my garage, on a thin outdoor carpet over a concrete floor. The issue I'm having is not with ground vibrations, but rather with the pad and cymbal hits being audible inside the house thru the garage door as well as outside thru the garage door. This is an issue because of neighbors and I have young kids, and bedtime is the best time for me to play.

    I can't make any permanent changes to the house as it is rented, but I could probably hang blankets up on the walls or something. Anything to reduce the perceived sound inside and outside the garage.

    Any feedback would be appreciated.

    Thanks!


  • #2
    Well I'd say that hanging up a couple of blankets or carpets or such on the walls is the best choice. Other than replacing the rubber pads with mesh pads that is.
    Textile fabric is great for absorbing sounds, even placing an old sofa or such in your garage could probably help alot.
    I remembered when I had my old Alesis DM5 kit with those horribly noisy mylar heads, I ended up wrapping every drum with old tank-tops with very thick fabric that I had gotten after a spinal surgery, they went under the support corset I had to wear for a while after the surgery so they where pretty thick and VERY slim-fit, so I used them to cover every drum. Most of the rebound went away and the drums had pretty horrible feeling to them afterwards, so I wouldn't recommend doing the same, just letting you know what options you have!

    I'd say the best way would be to make kind of a cubicle out of blankets or such, 2-3 layers thick, would be the optimal way to go. You won't be able to see anything around you except the drums, but the fabric will kill the noise the best and by having multiple layers the air inbetween those layers will further help reduce the sound that escapes.

    Comment


    • #3
      Well I'd say that hanging up a couple of blankets or carpets or such on the walls is the best choice. Other than replacing the rubber pads with mesh pads that is.
      Textile fabric is great for absorbing sounds, even placing an old sofa or such in your garage could probably help alot.

      I remember when I had my old Alesis DM5 kit with those horribly noisy mylar heads, I ended up wrapping every drum with old tank-tops with very thick fabric that I had gotten after a spinal surgery, they went under the support corset I had to wear for a while after the surgery so they where pretty thick and VERY slim-fit, so I used them to cover every drum. Most of the rebound went away and the drums had pretty horrible feeling to them afterwards, so I wouldn't recommend doing the same, just letting you know what options you have!

      I'd say the best way would be to make kind of a cubicle out of blankets or such, 2-3 layers thick, would be the optimal way to go. You won't be able to see anything around you except the drums, but the fabric will kill the noise the best and by having multiple layers the air inbetween those layers will further help reduce the sound that escapes.

      Comment


      • #4
        Wow, this was exactly the answer I was looking for. The "cubicle" idea really helps iron out what I was going for. In addition, a blanket or 2 against the door to the house couldn't hurt.
        Thanks again!

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